Healthy break­fast— the key to bal­anced nu­tri­tion

China Daily (USA) - - LIFE / HEALTH - By LIU ZHIHUA

A healthy, nu­tri­tious break­fast should con­tain high-qual­ity pro­tein, car­bo­hy­drates, fruit and veg­eta­bles, and should be cooked healthily, but too many Chi­nese fail to eat this kind of a meal, an ex­pert said at the kick­off for the 2016 China Nu­tri­tion Com­mu­ni­ca­tion Con­fer­ence and Amway Nutrilite Nu­tri­tion China char­ity cam­paign, which runs through Novem­ber and will com­prise nu­tri­tion ed­u­ca­tion events in cities all over China.

The cer­e­mony, held in Bei­jing on Oct 25, fea­tured a fo­rum on nu­tri­tion ed­u­ca­tion, and was at­tended by top nu­tri­tion­ists, in­clud­ing Yang Yuexin, the di­rec­tor-gen­eral of the Chi­nese Nu­tri­tion So­ci­ety, and Ding Gangqiang, the di­rec­tor of the Na­tional In­sti­tute for Nu­tri­tion and Health, un­der the Chi­nese Cen­ter for Dis­ease Con­trol and Pre­ven­tion.

“A bal­anced diet means the nu­tri­tion of three meals in a day should be bal­anced, and break­fast is very im­por­tant to achieve that goal ,” says Ding.

Skip­ping break­fast causes dam­age to health, apart from re­duc­ing work per­for­mance, he says, adding that stud­ies have showed that if a per­son does not eat break­fast reg­u­larly, he or she will be at a higher risk of obe­sity, di­a­betes, high blood lipids, stom­ach dis­ease and gall­stones, etc.

Skip­ping break­fast also has a neg­a­tive im­pact on a per­son’s cog­ni­tive abil­ity and speeds up ag­ing, he says.

How­ever, many peo­ple do not eat break­fast, says Ding, cit­ing a re­cent sur­vey, which showed that 8.6 per­cent of peo­ple do not eat break­fast ev­ery­day. The sit­u­a­tion is even worse in poverty-stricken ar­eas and among chil­dren aged be­tween 6 and 12.

While most peo­ple are used to eat­ing break­fast, the qual­ity of their meal is in ques­tion — about 25 per­cent of peo­pled ono tea ta home­made break­fast, and more than 80 per­cent of peo­ple do not con­sume a healthy break­fast— the sur­vey showed.

Chil­dren, women, and peo­ple liv­ing in poverty-stricken ar­eas are the most at risk when it comes to eat­ing un­healthy break­fasts, says Ding.

Among chil­dren aged be­tween 6 and 12, 82.2 per­cent do not eat healthy break­fasts, and among chil­dren aged be­tween 13 and 17, the per­cent­age is 80.7.

Among adults, 80.9 per­cent of those aged be­tween 18 and 44 do not eat healthy break­fasts, and for those aged be­tween 45 and 59, the per­cent­age is 81.4.

As for those who eat healthy break­fasts, those older than 60 topped the charts with 80.1 per­cent, mak­ing them the largest pop­u­la­tion group which was able to eat healthy in the morn­ing.

Ding cred­its this to the fact that older peo­ple, who are mostly re­tired, have time and pa­tience to cook break­fast them­selves.

A bal­anced diet means the nu­tri­tion of three meals in a day should be bal­anced, and break­fast is very im­por­tant to achieve that goal.” Ding Gangqiang, the di­rec­tor of the Na­tional In­sti­tute for Nu­tri­tion and Health, un­der the Chi­nese Cen­ter for Dis­ease Con­trol and Pre­ven­tion

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