For a skilled la­bor force

ChinAfrica - - Africa Re­port -

What’s driv­ing the grow­ing in­vest­ment in private ter­tiary ed­u­ca­tion in Africa?

The first is re­lated to de­mo­graph­ics. A 2014 re­port by the United Na­tions Chil­dren’s Fund fore­cast that 40 per­cent of the world’s pop­u­la­tion may be African by 2100. By 2050, the num­ber of Africans un­der the age of 18 may swell to around 1 bil­lion. African lead­ers would need to make the right in­vest­ments in chil­dren to build a “skilled, dy­namic African la­bor force,” the re­port’s lead­ing author David An­thony told npr.com.

But student en­rol­ment on the con­ti­nent has grown faster than most gov­ern­ments have been able to fi­nance, re­sult­ing in a de­cline in the avail­abil­ity and qual­ity of ed­u­ca­tion. Africa has fewer than 2,000 col­leges and uni­ver­si­ties for a pop­u­la­tion of 1 bil­lion peo­ple in 54 coun­tries, while the United States has more than 4,000 in­sti­tu­tions for 320 mil­lion peo­ple, Phillip L. Clay, a for­mer chan­cel­lor of the Mas­sachusetts In­sti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy, told the in March. Fewer than 7

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