WORDMATTERS

“All the ob­jects are used to set the scene and there is no power. So there is no need to worry about the dan­ger of the mon­keys hav­ing elec­tric shock.”

Global Times – Metro Beijing - - TWOCENTS -

So said Wu Zhaozheng, gen­eral man­ager of Bei­jing Wildlife Park. The park opened a new macaque dis­play area over the Chi­nese Na­tional Day hol­i­day. Cov­er­ing more than 5,600 square me­ters, the park uses old aban­doned elec­tric poles and high­volt­age dis­tri­bu­tion boxes as the back­drop, al­low­ing mon­keys to play and climb freely in the area. Ac­cord­ing to Wu, wires, mix­ers, cars and other man-made de­vices are sym­bols of mod­ern civ­i­liza­tion, which form a strong vis­ual con­trast with nat­u­ral land­scape such as trees, grass and flow­ing wa­ter. He hopes this new ex­hi­bi­tion will lead to greater think­ing among vis­i­tors. (Source: Bei­jing Morn­ing Post)

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