GREE N BUILD­INGS

Hong Kong Tatler - - Features -

Build­ings ac­count for a whop­ping 90 per cent of the city’s elec­tric­ity con­sump­tion, but a Beijing de­vel­op­ment by the Parkview Group shows how this prodi­gious use of en­ergy can be curbed. Parkview Green, a mixed-use mall, ex­pends 50 per cent less than an av­er­age build­ing of the same size. Its glass walls and trans­par­ent plas­tic roof­ing, com­bined with other in­no­va­tions, en­sure op­ti­mal nat­u­ral light and year-round cli­mate con­trol with min­i­mum en­ergy con­sump­tion, while elec­tronic taps and the use of re­cy­cled wa­ter for ir­ri­ga­tion en­sure wa­ter con­ser­va­tion. The mall is one of a small group of de­vel­op­ments across the globe to have been awarded the top rank in the US Lead­er­ship in En­ergy and En­vi­ron­men­tal

De­sign (LEED) cer­ti­fi­ca­tion. Parkview Group ex­ec­u­tive di­rec­tor Leo Hwang says en­vi­ron­men­tal sen­si­tiv­ity is a pri­or­ity for the group. “It has be­come part of the DNA of the company,” he says. “Green shouldn’t be an add-on. It should just be the way it is. You should be able to as­sume the build­ings you fre­quent are safe not just for you, but for the en­vi­ron­ment.” While China has seen nu­mer­ous rev­o­lu­tion­ary de­vel­op­ments in en­vi­ron­men­tally friendly con­struc­tion over the past few years, Hwang notes, “You don’t see Hong Kong de­vel­op­ers shout­ing ‘ We are ul­tra-green! We are sav­ing en­ergy!’” The high cost of land here means de­vel­op­ers of­ten es­chew green fea­tures to save money, so he be­lieves the gov­ern­ment should con­sider cre­at­ing fi­nan­cial in­cen­tives to en­cour­age sus­tain­able de­vel­op­ment.

THEN AND NOW THE ABOVE REN­DER­ING SHOWS DES VOEUX ROAD TRANS­FORMED INTO A LUSH, GREEN PROMENDADE– A MARKED CHANGE FROM THE STREET’S CUR­RENT STATE

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