FROM ALL AN­GLES

Hong Kong Tatler - - Cars -

grad­u­ate of Lon­don’s Royal Col­lege of Art and pre­vi­ously chief designer at Jaguar, the 46-year-old bears a re­mark­able like­ness to Prime Min­is­ter David Cameron. “I like to imag­ine peo­ple as cars,” he tells me over mouth­fuls of salmon tartare. “A Rolls walks that fine line of sta­tus and author­ity. I imag­ine Peter Cush­ing or Rita Hay­worth. It needs beauty, in­tel­lect and a lit­tle bit of ar­ro­gance. If you have a con­ver­sa­tion with it, the car will get the up­per hand.”

The Ghost has been Rolls’ best-sell­ing car. Or­ders are up 40 per cent in the Asi­aPa­cific re­gion and, star­tlingly, 60 per cent in sup­pos­edly belt-tight­en­ing Europe. The Ghost is the ju­nior of Rolls’ two four-door mod­els, the daddy be­ing the Phantom. While the Phantom is a be­he­moth rarely driven by the owner, the Ghost is more akin to a long-wheel­base Mercedes S- Class, though con­sid­er­ably more ex­pen­sive. But to com­pare a Ghost with an S- Class is to miss the point, be­cause a Rolls-royce is like no other car.

You don’t drive a Rolls-royce; it wafts. You don’t travel; the world comes to you. There is no sport but­ton, no pad­dle shift. Screens are hid­den be­hind wood and only ap­pear if needed. The only la­belling in the cabin are

THE EX­TE­RIOR OF THE GHOST SE­RIES II COM­BINES IM­PACT AND RE­STRAINT. THERE’S AN ECON­OMY OF LINE, BUT ALSO VERVE

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