Namiri Plains

Hong Kong Tatler - - Life -

Bob Mar­ley is alive and well and liv­ing in the Serengeti. His long black dreadlocks are a lit­tle mat­ted and his eyes are half closed as he dozes in the shade of an old aca­cia tree. He’s one of 32 lions we’ve en­coun­tered in just three days at Namiri Plains, a new tented camp in the Soit le Motonyi area of the eastern Serengeti. Soit le Motonyi has been closed to the public for the past 20 years so the an­i­mals could breed with­out in­ter­fer­ence, and the re­sults are as­tound­ing. Namiri means “big cat” in Swahili and it cer­tainly lives up to its name—on each game drive we see dozens of chee­tah re­lax­ing with their cubs and prides of lion crowded around bloody kills. This trend con­tin­ues back at the camp, where a res­i­dent lioness lies on a gran­ite out­crop by the din­ing tent, watch­ing with yel­low eyes as we eat. The camp is un­fenced, but don’t worry; you’re ac­com­pa­nied to and from your tent by a spear-wield­ing Maa­sai guide. The eight en-suite tents are beau­ti­fully dec­o­rated and re­mark­ably un­tent-like, with big com­fort­able beds, arm­chairs, wardrobes, pow­er­ful showers and out­door ham­mocks that sway in the hot African breeze. namiriplains.asil­i­aafrica.com

NAMIRI MEANS “BIG CAT” IN SWAHILI AND IT CER­TAINLY LIVES UP TO ITS NAME—ON EACH GAME DRIVE WE SEE DOZENS OF CHEE­TAH RE­LAX­ING WITH THEIR CUBS AND PRIDES OF LION CROWDED AROUND BLOODY KILLS

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