TOP 3 NEW WAYS TO CHARTER

三大新型包机模式

Jet Asia Pacific - - Feature - Text by James Wynbrandt

Ahost of new charter service offerings - shuttle flights, membership clubs, and “private” airlines among them - are promising to bring a new level of accessibility and economy to the private jet world. If they haven’t swept the Asia-pacific region quite yet, they’ll likely make waves soon, while anyone using charter in the U.S. or Europe has no doubt heard about them already. Yet the definitions of these new categories of charter – and what they offer - can be confusing, vague, and overlap one another. Here’s an explanation of the basics of these new styles of air charter - and what’s behind their sudden appearance.

PRIVATE AIRLINES

So-called private airlines offer access to fleets of executive aircraft that fly scheduled routes and operate from general aviation terminals, sparing travelers many of the hassles of airline travel. California’s Surf Air, which owns and operates a fleet of Pilatus PC-12 turboprops, epitomizes the model, which includes Rise and Jetsuitex. Surf Air (which operates in Europe as well) introduced the now-copied “all-you-can fly” subscription fee pricing concept. Members pay an initiation fee and monthly membership dues (about $2,000 each for basic service), allowing them to fly as often as they like, limited only by the number of reservations they can hold (between two and six based on membership level) at any one time.

Because of Surf Air’s revenue model, some people conflate private airlines with membership charter clubs. But Jetsuitex, which is grouped into the private airline camp, charges no fees or dues, and sells seats on its scheduled charter flights to anyone, making it not a membership club, or even private at all.

MEMBERSHIP CLUBS

Membership access models vary in their offerings (and include some private airlines, as noted above), but all levy a membership fee and/or ongoing charges, monthly or annually, providing access to a better choice of aircraft (based on quality and/or cost) than

一系列全新的包机服务,如通勤飞行、会员俱乐部和“私人”航空公司,正在将私人飞机的可行性和经济性提升至全新的级别。但这些服务尚未完全席卷亚太地区,不然早已风靡世界,因为欧美的包机用户都已非常熟悉。不过,这些全新包机形式的定义和服务内容还是会令人混淆、迷惑、分不清楚。今天我们就介绍一下这些全新航空包机服务类型的基本情况,以及它们出现的原因。

私人航空公司

私人航空公司使用公务机机队执飞定期航线,并在通用航空航站楼运营,其旅客可远离普通商业航班的诸多不便。加利福尼亚州的“冲浪航空”即运营着一支皮拉图斯PC- 12涡桨飞机机队,该类型公司还包括Rise和Jetsuitex。“冲浪航空”(也在欧洲运营)推出了“满足所有飞行”的会员费模式,目前已被广泛效仿。会员只需支付入会费和月会员费(基本服务约2000美元)即可尽情飞行,只限制同时持有的订座数量(根据会员级别26至 个订座)。

借鉴“冲浪航空”的营收模式,一些公司开始将私人航空公司和会员包机俱乐部结合起来。但被归入私人航空公司阵营的Jetsuitex不收取任何费用或会费,向所有人销售定期包机航班的座位,既不采用会员制,更不限于私人独享。

会员俱乐部

会员专享模式的服务各有不同(包括一些私人航空公司,如上),但都会收取会员费和/或后续费用,按月或按年,相比传统的包机渠道能够提供更好的飞机选择(基于品质和/或成本)。纽约市的Wheels Up航空公司是会员俱乐部模式的创始人,他们拥有空中国王350i双发涡桨飞机和奖状XLS轻型喷气机组成机队。会员支付17500美元入会费和每年8500美元年费即可享有机队一定小时数的使用权。通过非空中计划,会员还会受邀参与专享的地面活动,比如私人晚宴和VIP专享的娱乐和体育活动。

Jetsmarter是另外一种会员制形式,他们为会员提供精选的包机机队,价格较零售价低20%,首年费用15000美元,之后每年10000美元。Jetsmarter的另外一种会员计划是提供通勤飞行服务,这一模式越来越受运营商和客户欢迎。

通勤飞行/订座包机

通勤飞行是使用公务机运输的共享式定期包机航班,座位均独立对外出售,是原“订座”包机的全新形式,在经历了很多失败案例后可能会最终赢得市场。Jetsmarter拥有美国、欧洲和中东间的40余条通勤航线。今年,新成立的Bliss Jet航空推出了纽约和伦敦间的通勤服务,其他运营商也宣布将启动自己的通勤航班服务。

与此同时,此类服务在亚太地区也将开始出现。去年,日本的Sky Trek预定了架20 Kodiak Quest单发涡桨飞机,计划开启会员制的全新私人旅行服务。

you’d find available through traditional charter channels. Wheels Up, based in New York City, which owns a fleet of King Air 350i twin turboprops and Citation XLS light jets, is the progenitor of the membership club model. Members pay an initiation fee ($17,500) and annual dues ($8,500) giving them access to the fleet at fixed hourly costs. Membership also includes invitations to exclusive on-the-ground activities – like private dinners and VIP access to entertainment and sporting events - through the company’s Wheels Down program.

Jetsmarter, another membership access model, provides its members entrée to a vetted charter fleet at rates it claims are some twenty percent below retail, making the $15,000 first year charge and $10,000 annually therafter worthwhile. Another Jetsmarter membership program provides access to Jetsmarter’s shuttle flights, a category that is becoming increasingly popular among both providers and customers.

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