RAFAEL DIAZCASAS

Art On Cuba - - Index -

Re­call­ing the land­scapes by Clyf­ford Still for its open com­po­si­tion, Sfu­mato (Epic), 2014, is the piece re­spon­si­ble for lead­ing the viewer’s path into ev­ery cor­ner, sup­port­ing the flow and the rhythm of the ex­hi­bi­tion’s po­et­ics. It takes over and car­ries vis­i­tors through Fernán­dez’ reality, in which she cre­ates wall draw­ings within the in­stal­la­tion chal­leng­ing their con­cep­tion of such. The syn­er­gic in­flux moves from one hall to the next, spread­ing in­tense waves that ex­pand and con­tract, cre­at­ing quiet mo­ments that lead to in­ti­macy and in­tro­spec­tive si­lence.

Sfu­mato is an ex­panded ver­sion of Epic, in­stalled at the Univer­sity of South Florida in 2009, where thou­sands of small landscape solid graphite pieces are in­di­vid­u­ally pinned into the white wall; below each of them is a resid­ual trace of what looks like a mi­nus­cule tra­jec­tory of the rock be­fore it set­tled in place. Museo­graph­i­cally and from its ar­range­ment the in­stal­la­tion leads into Black Sun (2014) at the main gallery.

More than one hun­dred feet long, the tour de force mul­ti­level gallery space is dom­i­nated by the sus­pend­ing Black Sun. Made of float­ing poly­car­bon­ate tubes, in­vis­i­bly held from the ceil­ing and dis­posed in an har­mo­nious un­du­lat­ing or­der, the in­stal­la­tion is a larger ver­sion of Fernán­dez’ Night Writ­ing (2012), seen at a com­pa­ra­ble place in Lehmann Maupin’s Chrystie Street Gallery in New York. In this ren­di­tion, the blacks and greys stay, while the pre­vi­ous bo­real pink is re­placed by a spec­trum of golden yel­low tones. The ef­fect takes the work to­ward a dif­fer­ent di­rec­tion. What was night­time north­ern light is now a golden en­light­ened path. The in­dus­trial qual­ity of the poly­car­bon­ate tubes, the cre­ative light­ness and sim­plic­ity of the man­ner she uses to as­sem­ble the work con­verge with the prac­tice and po­etic of

Félix González-Tor­res, an artist Fernán­dez has met and ad­mired.

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