FRANK GONZÁ­LEZ THE MAN OF THE THOU­SAND VOI­CES

Arte por Excelencias - - Cuba -

Frank Gonzá­lez trans­cends not only as an ex­cep­ti­o­nal Cuban ac­tor of ra­dio, te­le­vi­si­on, the­a­ter and ci­ne­ma, but for his gift of vo­ca­li­zing the most dis­si­mi­lar cha­rac­ters. It is enough to men­ti­on Mam­bí Co­lo­nel El­pi­dio Val­dés, the most po­pu­lar cha­rac­ter of Cu­ba, to whom he ga­ve voi­ce and li­fe, im­mor­ta­li­zed in the ani­ma­ted car­to­ons by di­rec­tor Ju­an Pa­drón.

"It is not only ha­ving the abi­lity to chan­ge your voi­ce, but to gi­ve li­fe to a cha­rac­ter from a ca­ri­ca­tu­re. This re­qui­res ima­gi­na­ti­on, fan­tasy and a work with your vo­cal cords un­til get­ting to design it as clo­se as pos­si­ble to what the child ima­gi­ned when he re­ad the car­to­on. It is to be­gin to do tri­als in a mi­crop­ho­ne un­til fin­ding the voi­ce, the tim­bre that works, the so­no­rous cha­rac­te­ris­tics that the per­so­na­ge must take from their phy­si­cal and psyc­ho­lo­gi­cal qua­li­ti­es; I would say it is so­met­hing al­most in­na­te.

«Pro­bably a lot of El­pi­dio Val­dés has emer­ged from the gat­he­rings I sha­red with Ju­an Pa­drón in the Mi­li­tary Staff of the Re­vo­lu­ti­o­nary Navy, whe­re we we­re both sta­ti­o­ned at the mi­li­tary ser­vi­ce when, be­fo­re going to sleep, we would en­joy making jokes and gi­ving voi­ce to cha­rac­ters of sto­ri­es lo­a­ded of hu­mor in­ven­ted by both.

»El­pi­dio has gi­ven me in­fi­ni­te joys as an ac­tor. Not only has he allowed me to re­ach this au­di­en­ce, but to be well re­cei­ved and imi­ta­ted on ac­count of his te­ac­hings. The Cuban pu­blic has shown me their re­cog­ni­ti­on and gra­ti­tu­de, and that is the best pri­ze that an ac­tor can as­pi­re to.

"In ad­di­ti­on, through this cha­rac­ter I was able to me­et our Com­man­der in Chi­ef Fi­del Cas­tro and talk with him about the ma­te­ri­al ne­eds we re­qui­red to per­fect our dub­bing work, es­pe­ci­ally from a tech­no­lo­gi­cal point of vi­ew. The re­sult is to­day ma­te­ri­a­li­zed in the splen­did and mo­dern buil­ding of the Ani­ma­ti­on Film Stu­di­os of the Cuban Ins­ti­tu­te of Ci­ne­ma­to­grap­hic Art and In­dustry (ICAIC), which is na­med after El­pi­dio Val­dés, in who­se re­cor­ding la­bo­ra­to­ri­es Cuban ani­ma­ted films are cre­a­ted and made, which can com­pe­te in­ter­na­ti­o­nally.

«I fe­el sa­tis­fi­ed with my ca­re­er, alt­hough one always be­li­e­ves that one can do mo­re and bet­ter. In re­cent years, my he­alth con­di­ti­on has not allowed me to con­duct it as be­fo­re, alt­hough I'm still doing dub­bing and with spo­ra­dic ap­pe­a­ran­ces on te­le­vi­si­on.

»I am happy to be re­pre­sen­ted by Ac­tu­ar agency. I thank its workers for the sup­port they ha­ve gi­ven me and the in­flu­en­ce they ha­ve had on my ar­tis­tic li­fe. They are in char­ge of or­ga­ni­zing, making vi­a­ble and pro­mo­ting the work of the ac­tors, and they do it with pro­fes­si­o­na­lism and af­fec­ti­on».

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