Heart of the An­ti­gua Gua­te­ma­la

Excelencias Turísticas del caribe y las Américas (Centroamerica) - - Travel - By: Mai­tez Ro­dri­gues Pho­tos: Teteolivella.com

Vo­lu­mes of that pre-his­pa­nic past are al­so spo­ken by the wa­ter tanks or pu­blic wa­shers li­ke the Union Tank.

An­ti­gua was the New World’s first de­sig­ned city, map­ped out un­der a well-chec­ke­red ur­ban la­yout by Ita­lian ar­chi­tect Juan Bau­tis­ta An­to­ne­lli in 1542 and who­se step­pings­to­ne was on the Main Squa­re, the si­te from whe­re the burg grew and ex­pan­ded.

In re­li­gious-orien­ted buil­dings alo­ne, An­ti­gua ma­na­ged to add 38 sh­ri­nes and con­vents, 15 ora­to­ries and cha­pels, many of which ha­ve now be­co­me pil­gri­ma­ge grounds, li­ke the Mercy Tem­ple and Con­vent –one of the fi­nest in An­ti­gua built in 1546 and fea­tu­ring th­ree do­med na­ves who­se in­teriors boast the city’s lar­gest foun­tain.

Li­ke any ot­her city, An­ti­gua is bles­sed with clas­si­cal views that sin­gle it out, li­ke the San­ta Ca­ta­li­na Arch. This mo­nu­men­tal land­mark that stands over the street was built in the la­te 17th cen­tury with the so­le pur­po­se of gi­ving clus­te­red nuns access bet­ween the two wings of the con­vent wit­hout ha­ving to step out on­to the streets.

Vo­lu­mes of that pre-his­pa­nic past are al­so spo­ken by the wa­ter tanks or pu­blic wa­shers un­der the sha­dows of por­ches –still in use by to­day’s lo­cal re­si­dents- or by the stick looms in which wo­men still wea­ve gaudy fa­brics in­to ama­zing gar­ments, or by the fa­mous Cat­he­dral, so many ti­mes re­built sin­ce the 16th cen­tury and that still flaunts its fi­ve vault.

The gran­deur of its co­lo­nial past peeks th­rough the foun­tains, squa­res and mo­nu­ments of an an­cient city that has for cen­tu­ries lied next to the Agua Vol­cano

Li­ke any ot­her city, An­ti­gua is bles­sed with clas­si­cal views that sin­gle it out, li­ke the San­ta Ca­ta­li­na Arch

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