“BREXIT” – A COLD SOUND­ING WORD

Financial Mirror (Cyprus) - - FRONT PAGE -

I write in a sad­dened frame of mind. Be­cause of my fel­low cit­i­zens, I may now be classed as a “Lit­tle Eng­lan­der”.

Last Fri­day, I got up at about 7 a.m. to make our morn­ing pot of tea, turned the tele­vi­sion on and heard that my English com­pa­tri­ots had voted for Bri­tain to leave the Euro­pean Union. I was greatly sad­dened, be­cause Mary and I had worked quite hard at lo­cal level in the late 1960s and be­gin­ning of the 1970s to help get the coun­try into The Com­mon Mar­ket, as it was called then, as well as us­ing what mod­est skills our Lon­don PR com­pany had to as­sist per­suad­ing me­dia peo­ple and “opin­ion for­m­ers”. What with Pres­i­dent de Gaulle and other Euro­peans who didn’t feel we be­longed in the E.U., it was a long and hard job.

Al­ways wary of “pub­lic opin­ion”, I felt un­easy when Prime Min­is­ter David Cameron, as part of his elec­tion cam­paign last year, promised the cit­i­zens of the U.K. a ref­er­en­dum on our EU mem­ber­ship. As the cam­paign un­folded, the “Leave” cam­paign, pop­u­larly called “BREXIT” was well led, I have to grudg­ingly ad­mit, by the phi­lan­der­ing po­lit­i­cal loose can­non Boris John­son, who, God help us, may be Prime Min­is­ter here shortly.

Hav­ing lived for a third of my adult life in Cyprus, I re­mem­ber the angst with which its cit­i­zens and for­eign res­i­dents alike watched the twists and turns of the is­land’s EUmem­ber­ship cam­paign, to its suc­cess­ful con­clu­sion in 2004. It felt so good when we got the news. It was a pre­cious achieve­ment. Cypri­ots are un­likely to waiver from their want­ing to be in the Euro­pean club, but if any­one should sug­gest a ref­er­en­dum – take heed of the fool­ish­ness of the English (I say English be­cause it was only England which voted Leave – Scot­land, North­ern Ire­land and Wales all voted Re­main) and have no truck with it!

There; that’s got that off my chest. Now to some­thing more im­por­tant: what to eat for din­ner. At least that’s not sub­ject to ref­er­en­dums. Sev­eral Emails have lately asked for more chicken recipes, so here are a cou­ple. Both in­clude gar­lic, so good in Cyprus. 1. Heat the oven to 150C / Fan 130. 2. Cook the shal­lots and gar­lic in a large flame-proof casse­role with 1 tbsp but­ter un­til soft­ened. 3. Add the pancetta and cook un­til the shal­lots be­gin to caramelise. 4. Mean­while, melt 1 tbsp of but­ter in a large deep fry­ing pan and brown the chicken on all sides, then put it into the casse­role, on top of the shal­lots, 5. Pour the brandy into the hot fry­ing pan and al­low to bub­ble up, stir­ring and scrap­ing. 6. Put a lighted match to the brandy and stand back while it flames up. When the flames have sub­sided, add the wine and bring to the boil, then pour the liq­uid over the chicken. 7. Add the stock and tuck in the bou­quet garni. 8. Cover and cook for hour, or un­til cooked through. 9. Re­move the chicken from the casse­role, cut into 8 por­tions and keep warm. Sim­mer the cook­ing liquor un­til re­duced by two thirds, then add the cream and pars­ley. 10. Re­turn the chicken to the pan to heat through. 11. Serve in bowls with mashed potato.

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