SAUVAGE, FOR THE ART OF TRAVEL ; IN THE SPOT­LIGHT, PLAYLIST

The Pullman Magazine - - Contents - IN­TER­VIEW CARO­LINE DIENE face­book.com/wear­e­sauvage https://sound­cloud.com/sauvage

LIGHT AND SO­PHIS­TI­CATED ELEC­TRO-POP IS FRENCH BAND SAUVAGE'S TRADE­MARK SOUND. PIERRE-ALAIN AND EDOUARD, THE TWO BAND MEM­BERS HAVE BEEN WORK­ING WITH CHRISTOPHE CAURRET, BETC POP'S CRE­ATIVE MU­SIC DI­REC­TOR, TO COM­POSE AN ORIG­I­NAL TRACK FOR PULL­MAN. THE AIM? GIVE THE BRAND, ITS HO­TELS & RE­SORTS A TRADE­MARK SONG WITH A STRONG PER­SON­AL­ITY, WHILST SI­MUL­TA­NE­OUSLY GIV­ING UP-AND-COM­ING ARTISTS A PLAT­FORM FOR EX­PO­SURE. WE CHAT TO PIERRE-ALAIN, THE GROUP’S LEAD SINGER AND ELEC­TRO SPE­CIAL­IST.

What kind of mu­si­cal train­ing did you both have?

Pierre-Alain :

Our train­ing was quite var­ied. I mainly stud­ied elec­tronic mu­sic, whist Edouard fo­cused mostly on or­ganic in­stru­ments (the pi­ano and gui­tar…). Then we both spent hours on end shut away on our own in our rooms, try­ing things out and learn­ing as we went. Dis­cov­er­ing how things work for your­self is ab­so­lutely vi­tal it helps you find your own way.

Where did your group, Sauvage, mean­ing “wild”, get its name?

We wanted a sim­ple name, and the one we chose still suits us today. When we first started out, we tended to ap­proach prob­lems in a pretty chaotic way, but our cur­rent way of work­ing is slightly less wild than it used to be. I guess now we just have a dif­fer­ent kind of wild­ness. What I like about this term is its am­biva­lence: when a wild per­son or an­i­mal is star­ing you in the eyes, you never re­ally know what they’re ac­tu­ally think­ing. In the same way, I like our tracks to be lay­ered with con­tra­dic­tory emo­tions. I’m fas­ci­nated by this con­cept of warm yet cold, of hov­er­ing be­tween one thing and an­other.

How does your cre­ative duo work?

Our per­son­al­i­ties are pretty com­ple­men­tary. In terms of our mu­sic, I try to write the track from start to fin­ish, and then Edouard en­riches the ar­range­ment with all the in­stru­ments he plays. He fleshes out the sound.

You’ve writ­ten the lyrics and mu­sic for a be­spoke track for the Pull­man brand, that can be heard in the ho­tels or when room ser­vice is called. How did this col­lab­o­ra­tion come about?

I got an e-mail ask­ing me if I was in­ter­ested. Pull­man were look­ing for a track on the theme of travel and dis­cov­ery – a theme that pretty much re­flects our ap­proach to mu­sic. It was re­ally weird to have a brief as the start­ing point, but in the end I found that the mu­sic flowed quite nat­u­rally. It’s a track that’s all about sim­plic­ity.

When you lis­ten to the track, what im­ages does it con­jure up in your head?

I like to pic­ture a trav­e­la­tor. You close your eyes and you can feel your­self glid­ing across the floor, quite serenely. It’s an op­por­tu­nity to just let go…

How do you like to travel?

I like ar­riv­ing some­where and then hir­ing a car, which gives me as much free­dom as pos­si­ble and al­lows me to stop off when­ever and wher­ever the mood takes. I en­joy em­bark­ing on an ad­ven­ture and not nec­es­sar­ily know­ing where, when or with whom I’m go­ing to end up sleep­ing that night.

Dis­cov­er­ing how things work for your­self is ab­so­lutely

vi­tal - it helps you find your own way...

What are your thoughts on de­ma­te­ri­al­ized mu­sic, such as it ex­ists today?

For a while I just fol­lowed the crowd, be­cause at the end of the day we don’t have much con­trol over this new way of con­sum­ing mu­sic. I no longer have any CDs at home, nor any DVDs for that mat­ter. It cer­tainly makes mov­ing much eas­ier. Now, though, lots of vinyls are start­ing to ap­pear again, like lit­tle totems pop­ping up to ma­te­ri­al­ize the very lifeblood of sound. I’m prob­a­bly go­ing to in­vest in a vinyl turntable some time soon. Maybe in 30 years’ time we’ll all have gone back to “phys­i­cal” mu­sic. Who knows… it’s dif­fi­cult to say.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from France

© PressReader. All rights reserved.