HIS­TORIC SITES

Where Berlin - - SIGHTSEEING -

Asisi’s Wall Panorama

Yade­gar Asisi cre­ated a panorama of di­vided Berlin, pre­sent­ing ev­ery­day life against the back­drop of the Wall on an imag­i­nary day in the 1980s. The artist's aim was to show how the pop­u­la­tion came to terms with the sit­u­a­tion, and the re­sult gives on­look­ers a glimpse of East Ger­man life. Daily 10am– 6pm. €10/4. www.asisi.de. Friedrich­str. 205. T: 0341.3555340. U Kochstraße. E3/E4

Berlin Wall Doc­u­men­ta­tion Cen­ter

MUST SEE Walk along one of the few sur­viv­ing stretches of the Berlin Wall in an area of the city where its im­pact was par­tic­u­larly dra­matic, then delve into its sto­ried history at the doc­u­men­ta­tion cen­ter. Doc­u­ments and orig­i­nal ra­dio broad­casts from both East and West chron­i­cle one of Ger­many’s sad­dest his­tor­i­cal pe­ri­ods. Grounds and open-air ex­hi­bi­tion: 8am-10pm daily; doc­u­men­ta­tion cen­ter: Tue–Sun 10am– 6pm. Free. www.ber­liner-mauer- gedenkstaette.de. Ber­nauer Str. 111. T: 030.467986666. U Ber­nauer Straße. E2

Check­point Char­lie

Dur­ing the Cold War, Check­point Char­lie was the main gate­way be­tween East and West. Shortly af­ter the Wall went up, US and Soviet tanks faced each other on this spot. To­day, the cross­ing point acts pri­mar­ily as a back­drop for tourist pho­to­graphs. U Kochstraße, U Stadt­mitte. E3/E4

East Side Gallery

While West Ber­lin­ers loved to ex­press their cre­ativ­ity by draw­ing graf­fiti and paint­ing on the Wall, East Ber­lin­ers were never al­lowed to use the di­vid­ing struc­ture as a can­vas. To make up for all the art­less years, artists from 21 coun­tries were called upon in 1990 to dec­o­rate one mile of the Wall's east­ern seg­ment with their work, cre­at­ing what is now known as the East Side Gallery. Müh­len­straße. S+U Warschauer Straße, S Ost­bahn­hof. G4

Holo­caust Me­mo­rial

MUST SEE Berlin’s trib­ute to the vic­tims of the Holo­caust is as big as a soc­cer field and con­sists of 2711 tomb­stone-like slabs of equal size and vary­ing heights, placed on un­even ground to con­vey a sense of claus­tro­pho­bia and dis­ori­en­ta­tion. The un­der­ground in­for­ma­tion cen­ter pro­vides a timeline of Jewish per­se­cu­tion. Ac­ces­si­ble 24 hours a day. Free. www.holo­caust-mah­n­mal. de. Cora- Ber­liner Straße. T: 030.2639430. U Bran­den­burger Tor. E3

Karl-Marx-Allee

Berlin’s best ex­am­ple of GDR- era Ne­o­re­al­ist ar­chi­tec­ture is a 90m- (295ft-) wide boule­vard built be­tween 1950 and 1960 to pro­vide hous­ing for thou­sands of res­i­dents and to act as a back­drop for mil­i­tary pa­rades. The street quickly be­came a source of na­tional pride for East Ger­many, due to its res­i­den­tial tower blocks in­spired by MUST SEE Be­tween 1945 and 1989, more than 20,000 peo­ple sus­pected of op­pos­ing the East Ger­man po­lit­i­cal sys­tem were ar­rested by the Stasi (se­cret po­lice) and brought to this cus­tody build­ing. In its first and dark­est years, the prison’s cel­lars, known as “the sub­ma­rine,” were used to in­flict psy­cho­log­i­cal tor­ture on the in­mates, while the rel­a­tively more hu­mane cells are on the up­per floors, next to a seem­ingly never- end­ing cor­ri­dor lined with in­ter­ro­ga­tion rooms. Tours in English on Wed, Sat, and Sun at 2:30pm in win­ter, daily at 11:30am and 2:30pm in sum­mer. €6/3. en.stiftung- hsh.de. Gensler­str. 66. T: 030.98608230. S Landsberger Allee, then Tram M5 to Freien­walder Str., then 10- minute walk. Off Map

Topographie des Ter­rors

MUST SEE One of the city’s main at­trac­tions and the old­est zoo in Ger­many in­cludes pav­il­ions that pro­vide am­ple in­door space, making the venue suit­able for rainy days. The zoo boasts the largest num­ber of species and to­tal an­i­mal res­i­dents in the world. The aquar­ium, one of the largest in Europe, fea­tures large tanks with pi­ran­has, sharks, and al­li­ga­tors. Daily 9am– 6:30pm. Zoo or aquar­ium: €13/6.50, un­der-5s free. Com­bined Zoo-Aquar­ium ticket: € 20/10. www.aquar­ium- berlin.de, www. zoo- berlin.de Har­den­berg­platz 8. T: 030.254010. S+U Zool­o­gis­cher Garten. C4

Berlin is one of three ful­lyfledged states of the Fed­eral Repub­lic of Ger­many, the other two be­ing Ham­burg

and Bre­men. MUST SEE On the site of the for­mer head­quar­ters of the SS and the Third Re­ich’s most im­por­tant of­fices, this per­ma­nent ex­hi­bi­tion re­counts the tragic history of Nazi forced la­bor, fo­cus­ing on the cen­tral in­sti­tu­tions of the SS and Third Re­ich po­lice and the crimes they com­mit­ted through­out Europe. A pre­served seg­ment of the Berlin Wall runs along ex­hi­bi­tion grounds. To Jan 3: Ger­many 1945: The Last Months of the War. Daily 10am– 8pm. Free. www.topographie.de. Niederkirch­n­er­str. 8. T: 030.2545090. U Kochstraße, S+U Pots­damer Platz. E4

Trä­nen­palast (Palace of Tears)

Un­til 1990, the de­par­ture hall of the Friedrich­straße sta­tion was also a border cross­ing for West Ber­lin­ers on their way home af­ter vis­it­ing rel­a­tives and friends in the East. The many painful farewells brought lo­cals to re­name the build­ing the “palace of tears.” The per­ma­nent ex­hi­bi­tion Border Ex­pe­ri­ence: Ev­ery­day Life in Di­vided Ger­many re­counts the ef­fects of the border on Ger­man res­i­dents of the time. Tue– Fri 9am–7pm, Sat–Sun un­til 6pm. Free. www.hdg.de. Re­ich­stagufer 17. T: 030.46777790. S+U Friedrich­straße. E3 through the city's dark past via a some­timesspooky, ac­tor-led ex­pe­ri­ence. Visi­tors are taken through at­trac­tions such as the old li­brary of Berlin, a plague-in­fected street, a tor­ture cham­ber, a se­cret court, and more. Not rec­om­mended for young chil­dren. Daily 10am– 6pm (win­ter week­ends un­til 5pm). € 20.50/12.30(dis­count when book­ing on­line). Un­der-14s must be ac­com­pa­nied by adult. Com­bined LE­GOLAND, Madame Tus­sauds, and Sea Life tick­ets avail­able. www.the­dun­geons.com. Span­dauer Str. 2. S+U Hack­escher Markt. F3

Berlin Zoo and Aquar­ium

Botanis­cher Garten

This large park was de­signed in the Ro­man­tic English style, with hills, lakes, and pretty green­houses. There is a palm house and a whole sec­tion ded­i­cated to ex­otic plants, in­clud­ing orchids, cacti, and car­niv­o­rous plants. Daily 9am– ca. one hour be­fore sun­set. Mu­seum closes at 6pm. €6/3. www.bgbm.org. Köni­gin- Luise-Str. 6- 8. T: 030.83850100. S Botanis­cher Garten. Off Map

Chil­dren’s Mu­seum Labyrinth

One of Berlin’s two chil­dren’s mu­se­ums. Two floors of ac­tiv­ity sta­tions on the theme of con­struc­tion. Pleas­ant out­door area for the warmer days. Open Mo- Fri 9am- 6pm, Sat 1– 6pm, Sun 11– 6pm. €4.50 for all over-3s (3.50 on Fri­days). www.labyrinth- kin­der­mu­seum.de. Os­loer Str. 12. T: 030.800931150. U Os­loer Straße then tram. Off Map

Chil­dren’s Mu­seum MachMit

MUST SEE A hands- on mu­seum for chil­dren. There is a climb­ing struc­ture, a maze, a soap making work­shop, a cin­ema, and lots of ac­tiv­i­ties to en­cour­age dis­cov­ery through play­ing. Tue–Sun 10am– 6pm. € 5.50 for all over-3s. www.mach­mit­mu­seum.de. Sene­felder­str. 5/6. T: 030.74778200. S Pren­zlauer Allee.

Cur­ry­wurst Mu­seum

A spe­cial agent's brief­case ex­posed at the Spy Mu­seum Berlin (p. 40).

F1 Learn about Berlin’s most fa­mous street food at this small but en­ter­tain­ing mu­seum. Delve into Cur­ry­wurst history, dis­cover the se­crets of its yel­low sauce in the "spice cham­ber," and watch movies star­ring the de­li­cious sausage. Daily 10am– 6pm. €11/ 7, un­der- 6s free. www. cur­ry­wurst­mu­seum.de. Schützen­str. 70. T: 030.88718647. U Kochstraße, U Stadt­mitte. E4

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