HIS­TORIC SITES

Where Berlin - - SIGHTSEEING -

Asisi’s Wall Panorama

Yade­gar Asisi cre­ated a panorama of di­vided Berlin, pre­sent­ing ev­ery­day life against the back­drop of the Wall on an imag­i­nary day in the 1980s. The artist's aim was to show how the pop­u­la­tion came to terms with the sit­u­a­tion, and the re­sult gives on­look­ers a glimpse of East Ger­man life. Daily 10am– 6pm. €10/4. www.asisi.de. Friedrich­str. 205. T: 0341.3555340. U Kochstraße. E3/E4

Berlin Wall Doc­u­men­ta­tion Cen­ter

MUST SEE Walk along one of the few sur­viv­ing stretches of the Berlin Wall in an area of the city where its im­pact was par­tic­u­larly dra­matic, then delve into its sto­ried his­tory at the doc­u­men­ta­tion cen­ter. Doc­u­ments and orig­i­nal ra­dio broad­casts from both East and West chron­i­cle one of Ger­many’s sad­dest his­tor­i­cal pe­ri­ods. Grounds and open-air ex­hi­bi­tion: 8am-10pm daily; doc­u­men­ta­tion cen­ter: Tue–Sun 10am– 6pm. Free. www.ber­liner-mauer- gedenkstaette. de. Ber­nauer Str. 111. T: 030.467986666. U Ber­nauer Straße. E2

East Side Gallery

MUST SEE Be­tween 1945 and 1989, more than 20,000 peo­ple sus­pected of op­pos­ing the East Ger­man po­lit­i­cal sys­tem were ar­rested by the Stasi (se­cret po­lice) and brought to this cus­tody build­ing. In its first and dark­est years, the prison’s cel­lars, known as “the sub­ma­rine,” were used to in­flict psy­cho­log­i­cal tor­ture on the in­mates, while the rel­a­tively more hu­mane cells are on the up­per floors, next to a seem­ingly never- end­ing cor­ri­dor lined with in­ter­ro­ga­tion rooms. Tours in English on Wed, Sat, and Sun at 2:30pm in win­ter, daily at 11:30am and 2:30pm in sum­mer. €6/3. en.stiftung- hsh.de. Gensler­str. 66. T: 030.98608230. S Landsberger Allee, then Tram M5 to Freien­walder Str., then 10- minute walk. Off Map

To­pogra­phie des Ter­rors

MUST SEE On the site of the for­mer head­quar­ters of the SS and the Third Reich’s most im­por­tant of­fices, this per­ma­nent ex­hi­bi­tion re­counts the tragic his­tory of Nazi forced la­bor, fo­cus­ing on the cen­tral in­sti­tu­tions of the SS and Third Reich po­lice and the crimes they com­mit­ted through­out Europe. A pre­served seg­ment of the Berlin Wall runs along ex­hi­bi­tion grounds. Daily 10am– 8pm. Free. www.to­pogra­phie.de. Niederkirch­n­er­str. 8. T: 030.2545090. U Kochstraße, S+U Pots­damer Platz. E4 The Berlin di­alect was in­flu­enced by the Huguenots in the 1600s. French words are still com­mon in the lo­cal par­lance. While West Ber­lin­ers loved to ex­press their creativ­ity by draw­ing graf­fiti and paint­ing on the Wall, East Ber­lin­ers were never al­lowed to use the di­vid­ing struc­ture as a can­vas. To make up for all the art­less years, artists from 21 coun­tries were called upon in 1990 to dec­o­rate one mile of the Wall's eastern seg­ment with their work, cre­at­ing what is now known as the East Side Gallery. Müh­len­straße. S+U Warschauer Straße, S Ost­bahn­hof. G4

Holo­caust Me­mo­rial

MUST SEE Berlin’s trib­ute to the vic­tims of the Holo­caust is as big as a soc­cer field and con­sists of 2711 tomb­stone-like slabs of equal size and vary­ing heights, placed on un­even ground to con­vey a sense of claus­tro­pho­bia and dis­ori­en­ta­tion. The un­der­ground in­for­ma­tion cen­ter pro­vides a time­line of Jewish per­se­cu­tion. Ac­ces­si­ble 24 hours a day. Free. www.holo­caust-mah­n­mal.de. Cora-Ber­liner Straße. T: 030.2639430. U Bran­den­burger Tor. E3

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