THE FOXY TALE

HK Golfer - - Liquid Assets -

Ac­cord­ing to Ja­panese mythol­ogy, Inari Okami, the god of rice, foxes, and saké, en­trusted his fox spir­its to guard the Torii gates. The Torii, most com­monly found at the en­trance of or within a Shinto shrine, sym­bol­i­cally marks the tran­si­tion from the pro­fane to the sa­cred. Only the purest of souls were al­lowed to pass through. Four Fox Saké rep­re­sents the pu­rity and per­fec­tion of the Inari fox spir­its. The bot­tle, in its en­tirety, is a tribute to Inari Okami. Be­gin­ning with the crest, the four foxes guard the Torii gate as snow falls on the rice­cov­ered grounds. The swords rep­re­sent the ancient sword­smiths to whom Inari was god, and the chrome fin­ish, com­pleted with a wooden cap, cre­ates mod­ern take on an ancient clas­sic.

In the foot­steps of its mythol­ogy, Four Fox is per­fectly pure - best served straight up, ei­ther well chilled, or on the rocks. The saké did catch the at­ten­tion of Hong Kong’s renowned bar­tender, An­to­nio Lai who went on to cre­ate the ‘Fox­tails’ cock­tail se­ries, in­clud­ing the ‘MoFo’ mo­jito, mix­ing lime juice, elder­flower syrup, cu­cum­ber, mint leaves and soda wa­ter.

Lai said at the time, “From the bot­tle de­sign to the prod­uct, it’s all about at­ten­tion to de­tail. Four Fox Saké is cre­ated for those who are pas­sion­ate about saké. I be­lieve that mak­ing cock­tails is an art which in­volves com­bin­ing art and sci­ence to achieve the per­fect tast­ing notes - rich, bal­anced and crisp and Four Fox em­bod­ies the true art form of saké mak­ing.”

To make things ex­tra spe­cial, Four Fox sources its wa­ter from the pris­tine Ja­panese town of Tsunan in Ni­igata pre­fec­ture, where it boasts the high­est an­nual snow­fall in the whole coun­try. The saké is a Jun­mai Daig­injo - only the high­est des­ig­na­tion given to the spirit, no big­gie. What this means is the im­pu­ri­ties in the rice ker­nels are milled down as much as pos­si­ble, and only wa­ter, rice, and koji cul­ture are used in the mak­ing of the spirit.

Four Fox isn’t just about bring­ing a cen­turies-old tra­di­tion into the mod­ern day. As co-founder An­drew Rizkalla ex­plains, “we want this to hold its own against the vod­kas - what we’re try­ing to do is ex­pand the saké mar­ket, to peo­ple who wouldn’t have even thought of it. So ide­ally we can cre­ate this whole new mar­ket of saké drinkers who don’t even know any­thing about saké - they just drink Four Fox.”

Hong Kong is a plum mar­ket for saké, with a plethora of high end Ja­panese restau­rants and spe­cial­ist saké bars, such as Zuma, Go­denya and Jinn, but as Manag­ing Direc­tor Michael Cam­pion says that the ma­jor­ity of saké’s suc­cess lies with right brand­ing - for­tu­nate, per­haps that Four Fox comes in an ex­tremely vis­i­ble sil­ver light-up bot­tle.

Four Fox Saké is avail­able now via HK Golfer on­line store: store.hk­golfer.com

Four Fox comes in an ex­tremely vis­i­ble sil­ver light-up bot­tle

Four Fox Saké is a Jun­mai Daig­injo - only the high­est des­ig­na­tion given to the spirit, which means the im­pu­ri­ties in the rice ker­nels are milled down as much as pos­si­ble

The bot­tle, in its en­tirety, is a tribute to Inari Okami. the god of rice, foxes, and sake

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Hong Kong

© PressReader. All rights reserved.