Any al­go­rithm for anti-age­ing?

Today, Bol­ly­wood su­pers­tar Amitabh Bachchan (76) is as busy (if not more) as he was when young. At 42 (in 2008), Shah Rukh Khan built his six-pack abs overnight (well, al­most). The su­pers­tar of the 1990s, Mad­huri Dixit (at 40) made a come­back in a ve­hi­cle

Alive - - Contents -

Age­ing is the nat­u­ral wear and tear of the body’s com­po­nent parts. It’s in­evitable, and end­lessly in­trigu­ing. While many age-re­lated changes can­not be pre­vented, a life­style that in­cludes ex­er­cise and a well­bal­anced diet will surely or min­i­mize many prob­lems. In a 2013 poll, Amer­i­can Hol­ly­wood star Demi

Moore was voted as be­ing the most in­spir­ing fe­male celebrity for age­ing grace­fully. The poll was con­ducted by a fash­ion Web­site. Moore beat He­len Mir­ren (Bri­tish ac­tress), Michelle Obama (ex US First Lady) and Michelle Pfeiffer (Amer­i­can ac­tress).

Today, Bol­ly­wood su­pers­tar Amitabh Bachchan (76) is as busy (if not more) as he was when young. At 42 (in 2008), Shah Rukh Khan built his six-pack abs overnight (well, al­most). The su­pers­tar of the 1990s, Mad­huri Dixit (at 40) made a come­back in a ve­hi­cle cen­tred around her. The ac­tor sang and danced with the vigour of a 20-year-old in “Aaja Nach­ley”! For all of them, age isn’t a de­ter­rent. Ad guru + is a clas­sic ex­am­ple of this phi­los­o­phy. Says this sep­tu­a­ge­nar­ian: “Chrono­log­i­cal age has noth­ing to do with how you lead your life. It is one’s de­ter­mi­na­tion that mat­ters. No­body should re­tire. In­stead, they should re­tyre.”

And, don’t look on on­line cal­cu­la­tors of “bi­o­log­i­cal age” for an an­swer. Those fo­cus mainly on risk fac­tors for dis­eases, and say lit­tle about nor­mal age­ing, the slow, mys­te­ri­ous process that turns chil­dren into codgers. In fact, sci­en­tists are still hunt­ing for bi­o­log­i­cal mark­ers of age that re­li­ably reg­is­ter how fast the process is un­fold­ing.

Seem­ingly ob­vi­ous can­di­dates won’t do. Wrin­kles, for in­stance, of­ten have more to do with sun ex­po­sure than age­ing. Skin de­te­ri­o­rates as it ages, but its ex­po­sure to sun­light in­hibits the abil­ity of fi­brob­lasts (con­nec­tive

“Age is some­thing that does not mat­ter, un­less

you are a cheese.” - Luis Bunuel (film­maker)

by Ma­haraaj K. Koul

tis­sue cells) to pro­duce col­la­gen which gives skin shape and elas­tic­ity and sup­ports the blood ves­sels that per­me­ate it. The hands, face, neck, and up­per chest all suf­fer more than un­ex­posed skin, and light­pig­mented peo­ple wrin­kle more read­ily than others.

The Ar­chives of Der­ma­tol­ogy

A re­view in The Ar­chives

of Der­ma­tol­ogy con­cludes that three anti-age­ing treat­ments are proven clin­i­cally ef­fec­tive: the top­i­cal ap­pli­ca­tion of retinol; car­bon diox­ide laser resur­fac­ing; and, in­jec­tion of hyaluronic acid (a mois­ture-re­tain­ing acid that oc­curs nat­u­rally in the skin). Each de­pends on the same mech­a­nism, the in­ter­ac­tion of the fi­brob­lasts with col­la­gen they pro­duce. Amer­i­can re­searchers have found that it was “pos­si­ble to slow and even re­verse var­i­ous as­pects of age­ing through­out the body” by re­plen­ish­ing adult stem cells that con­trol how quickly the body grows old. The small bun­dle of neu­rons that ap­pears to keep a tight rein on age­ing is called the hy­po­thal­a­mus and is lo­cated at the base of the brain. Tests have been car­ried out on lab mice to pin­point this area.

There is a whole

ev­er­last­ing youth may be fu­tile, as sci­en­tists have math­e­mat­i­cally proven that it is im­pos­si­ble to halt age­ing in mul­ti­cel­lu­lar or­gan­isms like hu­mans. Cur­rent un­der­stand­ing of “or­gan­isms with long life­spans” to re­pro­gram­ming of DNA and tech­nol­ogy for mak­ing the “mind live on af­ter the body ex­pires.” sce­nario in which life ex­pectancy “grows faster” than the cy­cle of age­ing!

The new tech in­vestors (see BOX) be­lieve that re­build­ing and smor­gas­bord of op­tions to fight the age­ing process: Re­gen­er­a­tive medicine mar­ket is cur­rently at $1.6 bil­lion and is fore­cast to reach $20 bil­lion by 2025! Av­er­age life ex­pectancy has more than dou­bled since 1900. Cur­rently it stands at 70 years. There is 351% in­crease in num­ber of 85+ be­tween 2010 and 2050 is es­ti­mated!

The idea is sci­ence can help us at­tain “longevity es­cape ve­loc­ity”, a re­gen­er­at­ing or­gans, cells and DNA will help peo­ple live longer and bet­ter!

The idea is to use chips, soft­ware pro­grammes, al­go­rithms and big data to “up­grade the hu­man body”!

The ar­eas range from se­crets of liv­ing

Hol­ly­wood star Demi Moore voted most in­spir­ing fe­male celebrity for age­ing grace­fully.

In­ac­ti­vat­ing the frown-pro­duc­ing cor­ru­ga­tors in fore­head.

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