Pun­ish­ment for ball tam­per­ing and bad be­hav­iour

It is in­deed a right step in the right di­rec­tion by the In­ter­na­tional Cricket Coun­cil (ICC).

Alive - - News - by C. Subramaniam

In mod­ern cricket, we have 20 cam­eras or more watch­ing ev­ery bit of the ac­tion. The polic­ing is in­tense now. So, for Ban­croft and other play­ers to get some for­eign ma­te­rial to scruff the ball was pretty stupid. Tam­per­ing with the ball could now lead to a ban of up to six Tests or 12 ODIs af­ter the In­ter­na­tional Cricket Coun­cil (ICC) made it a level 3 trans­gres­sion be­sides adding ob­scen­ity and per­sonal abuse to the list of of­fences in a bid to en­sure bet­ter be­hav­iour on the field. At the end of its an­nual con­fer­ence in Dublin, the world body came up with its plan to curb un­ruly be­hav­iour on the field that has been un­der the scan­ner for a while now in the gen­tle­men’s game.

Up­grad­ing ball­tam­per­ing from a level 2 to a level 3 of­fence has come in the wake of the row ear­lier this year when Aus­tralian crick­eters Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Ban­croft were

It is all in the game and the Asian Coun­tries Bangladesh, In­dia, Pak­istan and Sri Lanka per­fected the art of ball tam­per­ing to make best use in a crick­et­ing field. Now the new law on ball tam­per­ing pun­ish­ing the erring player for 6 Tests or 12 One day matches is a wel­come one. Thus dirty tricks spoil the gen­tle­man's game and most of the so called se­nior crick­eters did in dif­fer­ent styles.

found guilty of chang­ing the con­di­tion of the ball dur­ing the third Test against South Africa in Cape Town. Ball tam­per­ing is­sue came to promi­nence when Du Plessis the South African player was fined 50 per cent of his match fee af­ter ad­mit­ting tam­per­ing with the ball. Du Plessis used pocket zip to roughen the ball and he was caught in the cam­era and the um­pires spot­ted the un­fair method of rub­bing the ball to the trousers. Ball tam­per­ing is part and par­cel in the world of cricket and it is not a new one.

Sorry Spec­ta­tors

Mansur Ali Khan Pataudi (ju­nior) rolled the new ball on the turf to re­move the shine and for the early in­tro­duc­tion of Bedi and Prasanna into the at­tack and the In­dian Um­pires those days were just sorry spec­ta­tors as the In­dian cap­tain was do­ing the dam­age to the ball. Rahul Dravid was caught while ap­ply­ing lozenge to the ball but not pe­nalised much. Sachin Ten­dulkar, the lit­tle mas­ter picked the seam of the ball in South Africa so as to pro­vide bet­ter grip to our spin­ners but left alone with least pun­ish­ment. Dirty tricks con­tinue to haunt In­ter­na­tional cricket.

Aus­tralian skip­per Steve Smith was made to shed his ar­ro­gance and was forced to quit as cap­tain from the Aus­tralian side af­ter Ban­croft was caught red handed rough­en­ing the seam of the ball with a yel­low ob­ject. In re­ac­tion to that Smith steps down as an Aus­tralian as well as Ra­jasthan Royals cap­tain.

This is not the odd case on the crick­et­ing field and it is the old­est pro­fes­sion to change the shape, re­move the shine or to keep shine on one side, or to roughen the en­tire ball to get bet­ter grip for spin­ners or to get re­verse swing for medium pac­ers. Soda wa­ter bot­tle cap spread in the boundary line helped our Ranji crick­eters to roughen the ball when the ball is hit to the boundary. As there were no cam­era for Ranji games then, play­ers de­lib­er­ately waited in the boundary line and made sure that the ball is rough­ened up to the de­sired level be­fore throw­ing the ball back to the bowler.

In school and col­lege level crick­eters, play­ers used to ap­ply hair oil in their per­son to keep the shine on the ball go­ing. Mike Atherton made it rather easy as he brought some dirt in­side his pocket and on en­ter­ing the ground and hav­ing got the ball in pos­ses­sion from the um­pire af­ter a break; he slowly ap­plied dirt on the ball but was caught red handed in the process. The worst of all the ball tam­per­ing was seen in In­dia in the 1977-78 se­ries against Eng­land. Tony Greig show­ered praise on our um­pires on reach­ing In­dia by say­ing that the In­dian um­pires are the best in the world. And this send a wrong sig­nal as our um­pires failed to note Vase­line be­ing ap­plied by John Lever, the left-arm medium pace bowler play­ing test cricket for the first time and fin­ished as the best all rounder in his de­but match as well the se­ries. He was keep­ing a cap­sule in his eye brow to pre­vent sweat en­ter­ing but in­side the cap­sule Vase­line was kept for easy ap­pli­ca­tion.

It is all in the game and the Asian Coun­tries Bangladesh, In­dia, Pak­istan and Sri Lanka per­fected the art of ball tam­per­ing to make best use in a crick­et­ing field. Now the new law on ball tam­per­ing pun­ish­ing the erring player for 6 Tests or 12 One day matches is a wel­come one. Thus dirty tricks spoil the gen­tle­man's game and most of the so called se­nior crick­eters did in dif­fer­ent styles and used dif­fer­ent meth­ods to roughen the ball to give an ex­tra edge to their bowlers. This is not the proper way play­ing cricket but they chose the op­tion to meet suc­cess for their team by hook or crook. Pun­ish­ment for ball tam­per­ing came at the right time and ICC de­serves all the praise, even though it came rather late.

Ball-tam­per­ing has been up­graded from a level 2 to level 3 of­fence.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.