Lit­tle Italy

Business Traveller (India) - - INSIDE NEW YORK CITY NEIGHBOURHOODS -

Lit­tle Italy, but nat­u­rally, houses the best Ital­ian restau­rants of the city. It was fondly named by the Ital­ian im­mi­grants who marched their way into New York City in the 1800s.

My de­tour through Chi­na­town had worked up quite an ap­petite (de­spite the snack­ing) by the time I reached Di Palo’s Fine Foods (face­book.com/di­palofine­foods; open daily 9am6:30pm, Sun­day un­til 4pm), a grocery store known for re­ally good Ital­ian cheese. Luck­ily for me, it en­cour­ages tast­ings. I sam­pled free cubes of var­i­ous cheese of­fered to vis­i­tors, in­clud­ing Parme­san and Bur­rata. Meat lovers must also take back Di Palo’s Porchetta, a savoury, fatty, and moist bone­less pork roast.

As I ven­tured fur­ther into the neigh­bour­hood, I found quaint lanes dec­o­rated in colours of Italy’s flag. By now, a rav­en­ous ap­petite had built up, tak­ing me to the first eatery I saw here — a lucky find. The charm­ing Ru­birosa (ru­birosanyc.com; open daily 11:30am-11pm, Thurs­daySatur­day un­til mid­night) is lo­cated in NoLita or “North of Lit­tle Italy”, where I gorged on hand­made spaghetti alla chi­tarra with meatballs that com­ple­mented my glass of Chardon­nay from Sil­ica. To please my sweet tooth, I skipped next door to the over 44-year-old Caffe Palermo

(caf­fepalermo.com; open daily 10:30am-23:30pm, Fri­day-Saturday un­til 12:30am), a lit­tle cof­fee shop on Mul­berry Street. Its fa­mous can­noli (a proud part of its logo) sim­ply dis­solved into my mouth on first bite; the cream fill­ing oozed out of its fried tube shells and be­came one with my taste buds.

It isn’t all about food in Lit­tle Italy though. A leisurely stroll through the mu­ral dis­trict (in an at­tempt to burn off the calo­ries) was next on my list. Many street artists like Tris­tan Ea­ton, Blek Le Rat and Ron English have used Mul­berry Street as their can­vas to paint evoca­tive graf­fiti. Look out for the well known artist Ron English’s green baby hulk, also known as “Tem­per Tot” — one of the high­lights of Lit­tle Italy. Pos­ing for a pic­ture with this an­gry one, is a pop­u­lar check-in to Lit­tle Italy on so­cial me­dia.

Pic­tured: Di Palo’s Fine Foods

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.