Dig­i­tal trans­for­ma­tion of the chem­i­cal in­dus­try

G Gana­p­athi­ra­man, ARC Ad­vi­sory Group, In­dia

Chemical Industry Digest - - What’s In? - G Gana­p­athi­ra­man

Digi­ti­sa­tion is trans­form­ing the chem­i­cal in­dus­try and IIoT is one great de­vel­op­ment of this that is ex­pected to bring about enor­mous change by sig­nif­i­cantly re­duc­ing the com­plex­ity of work­ing. In what all ways IIoT im­pacts and en­ables the chem­i­cal in­dus­try are de­scribed.

Ab­stract

In re­cent times the term In­dus­trial In­ter­net of Things (IIoT) has gained con­sid­er­able im­por­tance in var­i­ous sec­tors of in­dus­try as dig­i­ti­za­tion has be­come a busi­ness pri­or­ity for many or­ga­ni­za­tions. The Chem­i­cal In­dus­try has em­braced IIoT as it is ex­pected to bring about an enor­mous change by sig­nif­i­cantly re­duc­ing the com­plex­ity of work­ing within the in­dus­try.

In this ar­ti­cle, the au­thor has given a very well laid out step­wise ex­pla­na­tion as to how IIoT can im­pact the chem­i­cal in­dus­try, es­pe­cially in chem­i­cal plants as it in­te­grates in­for­ma­tion man­age­ment, con­trol and de­ci­sion mak­ing across the sup­ply chain, man­u­fac­tur­ing units and de­liv­ery process of an en­tire plant thus cre­at­ing bet­ter out­puts in the most en­ergy and re­source ef­fi­cient ways.

IIoT can in­te­grate and con­trol func­tions of var­i­ous chem­i­cal plants in dif­fer­ent ge­ogra­phies from a sin­gle re­mote lo­ca­tion.

In to­day’s highly reg­u­lated and com­pet­i­tive en­vi­ron­ment, chem­i­cal com­pa­nies must look beyond tra­di­tional in­dus­trial con­ven­tions and busi­ness norms and fo­cus on achiev­ing the de­sired out­comes via dig­i­tal trans­for­ma­tion. For many com­pa­nies, this need is re­in­forced as com­peti­tors, part­ners, sup­pli­ers, and cus­tomers be­gin em­ploy­ing dig­i­tal­ized busi­ness pro­cesses of their own. By ex­ploit­ing the con­ver­gence be­tween op­er­a­tional and in­for­ma­tion tech­nolo­gies, these com­pa­nies are con­nect­ing their en­ter­prises in­ter­nally, and ex­ter­nally through­out their sup­ply chain. This both re­quires and sup­ports new busi­ness mod­els and pro­cesses. In­tel­li­gent con­nected prod­ucts and as­sets, along with net­work com­mu­ni­ca­tions, soft­ware,

and ad­vanced an­a­lyt­ics al­low com­pa­nies to re­de­fine their ap­proach to busi­ness pro­cesses, in­clud­ing en­ter­prise as­set man­age­ment (EAM), prod­uct life­cy­cle man­age­ment (PLM), and sup­ply chain man­age­ment (SCM). These new busi­ness pro­cesses and mod­els will be made pos­si­ble by tech­nol­ogy ven­dors who have de­vel­oped the idea of Dig­i­tal Trans­for­ma­tion from a con­cept to func­tion­ing tools, with a fo­cus on the im­ple­men­ta­tion of the In­dus­trial In­ter­net of Things (IIoT) and In­dus­trie 4.0 con­cepts. The sum of these changes, the Dig­i­tal En­ter­prise, is equipped to de­sign and de­liver prod­ucts faster and more ef­fi­ciently, uti­liz­ing new ap­proaches to prod­uct in­no­va­tion, pro­duc­tion tech­niques, and ser­vice and op­er­at­ing mod­els.

As­set own­ers in the chem­i­cals in­dus­try have em­barked on a jour­ney to an­swer the fun­da­men­tal ques­tions of how dig­i­tal trans­for­ma­tion im­pacts prod­ucts and man­u­fac­tur­ing pro­cesses and where the in­dus­try is head­ing.

• PLM and chem­i­cal for­mu­la­tion pro­cesses in­clude el­e­ments of closed loop prod­uct and chem­i­cal for­mu­la­tions and dig­i­tal­iza­tion

• EAM pro­cesses now ex­pand to en­able pre­dic­tive and pre­scrip­tive main­te­nance, thus re­duc­ing cost and risk

• SCM pro­cesses are ex­pand­ing into omni-chan­nel and rad­i­cally im­prov­ing cus­tomer ex­pe­ri­ence and the chem­i­cal sup­ply chain

Be­fore we delve into these de­tails, we need to un­der­stand what IIoT is all about and how it can be ap­plied to the chem­i­cals in­dus­try.

In­dus­trial In­ter­net of Things

The In­dus­trial In­ter­net of Things (IIoT) ad­dresses the tech­no­log­i­cal rev­o­lu­tion in­dus­trial com­pa­nies are fac­ing. The in­dus­trial sec­tor is tran­si­tion­ing to a con­nected, in­for­ma­tion-driven, “smart” era in which cy­ber-phys­i­cal sys­tems, soft­ware-de­fined ma­chines, ubiq­ui­tous net­works, ad­vanced an­a­lyt­ics and ex­e­cu­tion soft­ware, and a new IT in­fra­struc­ture al­low man­u­fac­tur­ers to op­ti­mize pro­duc­tion sys­tems and sup­ply net­works to bet­ter serve cus­tomers’ in­di­vid­ual needs, cre­ate jobs and im­prove work­ers’ lives, im­prove sus­tain­abil­ity, and rad­i­cally im­prove pro­duc­tiv­ity, prod­uct in­no­va­tion, and busi­ness and ser­vice mod­els. The IIoT ar­chi­tec­ture builds on cur­rent and emerg­ing tech­nolo­gies such as in­tel­li­gent equip­ment with an IP ad­dress, ma­chine-to-ma­chine (M2M) com­mu­ni­ca­tions, mo­bil­ity, cloud com­put­ing, an­a­lyt­ics, and vi­su­al­iza­tion tools. The In­dus­trial IoT prom­ises im­proved per­for­mance of man­u­fac­tur­ers’ ser­vice op­er­a­tions through re­mote con­nec­tiv­ity as well as in­cre­men­tal con­nec­tiv­ity-based rev­enue streams that rep­re­sent en­tire new op­por­tu­ni­ties. Clearly, the value propo­si­tion for the IoT op­por­tu­nity ex­tends beyond sim­ple con­nec­tiv­ity into the abil­ity to build new prod­ucts and ser­vices and achieve com­pet­i­tive dif­fer­en­ti­a­tion.

There are four main parts to the In­dus­trial IoT: in­tel­li­gent as­sets with sen­sors, pro­ces­sors, mem­ory, and com­mu­ni­ca­tions ca­pa­bil­ity; data com­mu­ni­ca­tions and in­fra­struc­ture; soft­ware and an­a­lyt­ics; and peo­ple and busi­ness en­ti­ties that use the tech­nolo­gies for bet­ter de­ci­sion mak­ing and im­proved busi­ness pro­cesses and mod­els.

The in­dus­trial sec­tor is tran­si­tion­ing to a con­nected, in­for­ma­tion-driven, “smart” era in which cy­ber-phys­i­cal sys­tems, soft­ware-de­fined ma­chines, ubiq­ui­tous net­works, ad­vanced an­a­lyt­ics and ex­e­cu­tion soft­ware, and a new IT in­fra­struc­ture al­low man­u­fac­tur­ers to op­ti­mize pro­duc­tion sys­tems and sup­ply net­works to bet­ter serve cus­tomers’ in­di­vid­ual needs, cre­ate jobs and im­prove work­ers’ lives, im­prove sus­tain­abil­ity, and rad­i­cally im­prove pro­duc­tiv­ity, prod­uct in­no­va­tion, and busi­ness and ser­vice mod­els.

What Does Dig­i­tal­iza­tion / In­dus­trie 4.0 Mean for Chem­i­cal Com­pa­nies?

Chem­i­cal man­u­fac­tur­ing dif­fers in many as­pects from dis­crete man­u­fac­tur­ing. Chem­i­cal pro­cesses are highly com­plex and in­ter­min­gled. Com­po­nents in these pro­cesses are of­ten pro­duced by a net­work of com­pa­nies. Com­po­nents can be very toxic, mak­ing them dif­fi­cult or im­pos­si­ble to trans­port safely. Chlo­rine, for ex­am­ple, is some­times trans­ported di­rectly by pipe­line from one com­pany’s site to another’s. In gen­eral, safety con­sid­er­a­tions con­strain sup­ply chain flex­i­bil­ity con­sid­er­ably, and cre­ate strin­gent re­quire­ments for se­cu­rity and process safety.

The chem­i­cals in­dus­try is also very as­set in­ten­sive, with life­cy­cles of twenty to thirty years or more for ma­jor as­sets. Ac­cord­ing to the Euro­pean Chem­i­cal Coun­cil, Europe’s chem­i­cals out­put has been shrink­ing con­sid­er­ably both in ab­so­lute and in rel­a­tive terms, with much pro­duc­tion shift­ing to the Mid­dle East, Far East, and Gulf re­gions. Euro­pean chem­i­cal com­pa­nies con­trib­ute to this shift by in­vest­ing in other re­gions. Other chal­lenges are ac­cess to (low-cost) feed­stock and strin­gent reg­u­la­tions. Down­stream man­u­fac­tur­ing is also mov­ing out of Europe and end clients are more de­mand­ing in terms of trace­abil­ity, eco­log­i­cal foot­print or the added value of the end prod­uct. This last as­pect also rep­re­sents an op­por­tu­nity.

The strate­gic an­swer to these chal­lenges is that “Chem­i­cals 4.0” play­ers can thrive when they si­mul­ta­ne­ously mas­ter the sup­ply chain of feed­stock and re­sources, man­u­fac­tur­ing ef­fi­ciency (in­clud­ing in­ten­si­fi­ca­tion and dig­i­tal­iza­tion), as well as cus­tomer-spe­cific ap­pli­ca­tion value.

IIoT in the Chem­i­cal In­dus­try Equip­ment Mon­i­tor­ing

Un­planned down­time and un­pre­dictable main­te­nance costs are com­mon prob­lems in the chem­i­cal in­dus­try. Sen­sors at­tached to equip­ment will mon­i­tor qual­ity and through­put con­tin­u­ously, and real-time, in-mem­ory com­put­ing will help pre­vent equip­ment fail­ures and break­downs. This will re­sult in a higher over­all equip­ment ef­fec­tive­ness, longer mean time be­tween fail­ures, and more ef­fi­cient main­te­nance.

Im­prove Qual­ity

Many chem­i­cal man­u­fac­tur­ers have in­sight only into the op­er­at­ing con­di­tions for a set num­ber of batches, and this lim­its their abil­ity to op­ti­mize con­di­tions. Us­ing Big Data and pre­dic­tive an­a­lyt­ics across thou­sands of batches en­ables them to es­tab­lish op­er­at­ing con­di­tions that re­sult in more pre­dictable and bet­ter qual­ity.

En­ergy Man­age­ment

En­ergy makes up a huge por­tion of the cost of chem­i­cal man­u­fac­tur­ing, and com­pli­ance with in­creas­ingly strin­gent reg­u­la­tions is dif­fi­cult and costly. Us­ing con­nected sen­sors to mon­i­tor en­ergy con­sump­tion helps con­trol costs and en­sures com­pli­ance. En­ergy con­sump­tion pat­terns are an im­por­tant part of the Big Data an­a­lyt­ics for pre­dict­ing fail­ures; and man­ag­ing en­ergy con­sump­tion re­sults in en­vi­ron­ment-friendly op­er­a­tions, less un­planned down­time, and more con­sis­tent qual­ity.

Cy­ber­se­cu­rity

In a re­cent in­dus­try sur­vey, cy­ber­se­cu­rity was the top strate­gic is­sue cited by re­spon­dents. As chem­i­cal plants may be po­ten­tial tar­gets for ter­ror­ist at­tacks, cy­ber­se­cu­rity is un­der­stand­ably given pri­or­ity. Chem­i­cal com­pa­nies must con­sider phys­i­cal se­cu­rity, in­dus­trial sys­tems se­cu­rity, and data sys­tems se­cu­rity whether they run their busi­ness in the cloud or on premise. The prob­lem be­comes more com­plex as the amount of data com­pa­nies man­age and main­tain con­tin­ues to grow. With in-mem­ory com­put­ing and Big Data an­a­lyt­ics, chem­i­cal com­pa­nies can cen­tral­ize data, en­abling them to quickly iden­tify unau­tho­rized ac­cess or hack­ing at­tempts to pre­vent fur­ther in­tru­sion.

Im­ple­ment Tech­nolo­gies

Com­pe­ti­tion is fierce and mar­gins are thin in the chem­i­cal in­dus­try, so it’s im­per­a­tive that com­pa­nies de­ploy new tech­nolo­gies to con­trol costs and im­prove ef­fi­ciency. The IoT is help­ing to sim­plify busi­ness pro­cesses and pro­vide more in­sights that can help im­prove qual­ity, re­duce down­time, de­crease the costs of main­te­nance, and in­crease on-time de­liv­ery.

The Chal­lenges Faced by Chem­i­cal Man­u­fac­tur­ers

Re­cent eco­nomic and tech­nol­ogy trends have had ma­jor im­pacts on the global chem­i­cals in­dus­try. This

Com­pe­ti­tion is fierce and mar­gins are thin in the chem­i­cal in­dus­try, so it’s im­per­a­tive that com­pa­nies de­ploy new tech­nolo­gies to con­trol costs and im­prove ef­fi­ciency. The IoT is help­ing to sim­plify busi­ness pro­cesses and pro­vide more in­sights that can help im­prove qual­ity, re­duce down­time, de­crease the costs of main­te­nance, and in­crease on-time de­liv­ery.

ap­plies to both the spe­cialty chem­i­cals and bulk chem­i­cals sec­tors. The in­dus­try has also seen an in­crease in merger and ac­qui­si­tion ac­tiv­ity in re­cent years, and this trend is likely to con­tinue. The per­sis­tently low oil and gas prices, par­tic­u­larly in North Amer­ica, have had a ma­jor im­pact on the in­dus­try, since both are key feed­stocks for both spe­cialty and bulk chem­i­cal pro­duc­tion and pro­vide much of the en­ergy (ei­ther di­rectly or in­di­rectly) for these en­ergy-in­ten­sive sec­tors. While, un­til re­cently, North Amer­ica had seen few green­field or ex­pan­sion projects for spe­cialty chem­i­cals and vir­tu­ally none for bulk chem­i­cals; the com­pet­i­tive ad­van­tage pro­vided by shale oil and gas cre­ated a wave of ac­tiv­ity in both green­field and ca­pac­ity ex­pan­sion projects.

In gen­eral, there’s been a trend for global bulk and spe­cialty chem­i­cals man­u­fac­tur­ers to shift pro­duc­tion from well-es­tab­lished pro­duc­tion cen­ters in Europe, Ja­pan, and (to a some­what lesser de­gree) North Amer­ica; to cost-ad­van­taged China and In­dia and feed­stock-ad­van­taged Saudi Ara­bia, which has been mak­ing a ma­jor push to in­crease the value of its ex­ports and di­ver­sify its econ­omy. We’re see­ing sig­nif­i­cant in­vest­ments in state-of-the-art, world scale chem­i­cal pro­duc­tion fa­cil­i­ties in all these coun­tries.

In­creased global com­pe­ti­tion drives the need for greater ef­fi­cien­cies and cost re­duc­tions across the in­dus­try. While the scale and com­plex­ity of bulk chem­i­cal man­u­fac­tur­ing ap­pears to be in­creas­ing; spe­cialty chem­i­cals man­u­fac­tur­ers, par­tic­u­larly in Europe, are ex­plor­ing in­creased mod­u­lar­iza­tion of pro­duc­tion as­sets. This in­cludes de­vel­op­ment of new mod­u­lar “mi­cro” pro­duc­tion plants that can be eas­ily lo­cated close to ei­ther feed­stocks or end cus­tomers to re­duce lo­gis­tics costs.

In ad­di­tion to grow­ing pres­sures to re­duce both project-re­lated and op­er­a­tions-re­lated costs and ex­pen­di­tures, chem­i­cal man­u­fac­tur­ers face in­creased gov­ern­men­tal reg­u­la­tion. This in­cludes man­dates to in­crease safety and re­duce po­ten­tially harm­ful emis­sions. In gen­eral, the en­tire chem­i­cal in­dus­try is see­ing a move to­ward in­creased au­to­ma­tion to re­duce costs and com­pen­sate for the grow­ing skills short­age. In­creased dig­i­tal­iza­tion across the value chain is another clear trend.

The Trans­for­ma­tion of Prod­uct For­mu­la­tions (PLM) Pro­cesses

Con­tin­u­ing suc­cess in the chem­i­cals in­dus­try de­pends heav­ily on the abil­ity to quickly cre­ate and pro­duce new prod­ucts to meet con­sumer trends and chang­ing cus­tomer re­quire­ments and to en­sure ex­ist­ing prod­ucts con­tinue to meet chang­ing reg­u­la­tions. Although Prod­uct Life­cy­cle Man­age­ment (PLM) orig­i­nated in the dis­crete in­dus­tries, the ben­e­fit it de­liv­ers to prod­uct de­vel­op­ment, man­u­fac­tur­ing, sales and sup­port roles are be­ing uti­lized by an in­creas­ing num-

ber of chem­i­cals com­pa­nies.

As prod­ucts be­come more spe­cial­ized, prod­uct de­vel­op­ment re­quires greater col­lab­o­ra­tion with cus­tomers, in­gre­di­ent sup­pli­ers, and pack­ag­ing sup­pli­ers. Com­pa­nies that ef­fec­tively em­ploy PLM for col­lab­o­ra­tion and data man­age­ment will de­velop new prod­ucts faster, in­tro­duce them at lower cost, and bring them to mar­ket in less time. In ad­di­tion to en­hanc­ing ex­ter­nal col­lab­o­ra­tion, process-based PLM closes the loop of de­sign to pro­duc­tion and en­ables users to fine-tune prod­uct for­mu­la­tion based on yield mea­sure­ments and fluc­tu­at­ing cost el­e­ments. The con­tin­ued adop­tion of dig­i­tal­iza­tion among cus­tomers and sup­pli­ers ex­tends this in­for­ma­tion loop and sup­ports the uti­liza­tion of field ex­pe­ri­ence to drive prod­uct in­no­va­tion.

With the ex­pan­sion of emerg­ing mar­kets, and the con­tin­u­ous reg­u­la­tory changes in es­tab­lished mar­kets, the abil­ity to quickly and con­fi­dently validate for­mula and la­bel com­pli­ance against in­dus­trial and regional reg­u­la­tions is im­per­a­tive.

The data needed to meet these re­quire­ments varies greatly depend­ing on the reg­u­la­tory group and can come in a va­ri­ety of for­mats, struc­tured and un­struc­tured. De­spite this com­plex­ity, the doc­u­ment man­age­ment ca­pa­bil­i­ties of spe­cific PLM so­lu­tions can en­sure that prod­ucts meet reg­u­la­tions from con­cept to re­tire­ment, even as reg­u­la­tions change. Fur­ther­more, in­cor­po­rat­ing oper- ation tools like lot track­ing, that tie into a prod­uct data­base, can help speed up de­ci­sion mak­ing in the event of emer­gen­cies or re­calls.

The Trans­for­ma­tion of Main­te­nance and Op­er­a­tions Pro­cesses

A mod­ern En­ter­prise As­set Man­age­ment (EAM) sys­tem pro­vides the needed vis­i­bil­ity, plan­ning and ex­e­cu­tion to achieve the key goals for as­sets which are up­time, as­set longevity, cost con­trol, and safety along with the ex­ec­u­tive needs for high re­turn on as­sets (ROA).

Ac­cord­ing to many re­li­a­bil­ity stud­ies, roughly 80 per­cent of all as­sets fail ran­domly de­spite hav­ing rig­or­ous re­li­a­bil­ity and main­te­nance pro­grams in place. To ad­dress this ma­jor­ity of fail­ures, emerg­ing EAM so­lu­tions em­ploy IIoT tech­nolo­gies to en­able pre­dic­tive and pre­scrip­tive main­te­nance, far sur­pass­ing the ca­pa­bil­i­ties of con­tem­po­rary re­ac­tive, pre­ven­tive, and con­di­tion-based meth­ods. With IIoT, col­lect­ing data from equip­ment is mov­ing from pa­per-based, man­ual in­spec­tions to au­to­mated sys­tems. This im­proves both data qual­ity and quan­tity and dra­mat­i­cally ex­pands the num­ber and va­ri­ety of pa­ram­e­ters that can be mon­i­tored cost ef­fec­tively. An es­sen­tial in­gre­di­ent for this trans­for­ma­tion is the ap­pli­ca­tion of ma­chine learn­ing to rec­og­nize ob­scure pat­terns within his­tor­i­cal and op­er­a­tional data

As prod­ucts be­come more spe­cial­ized, prod­uct de­vel­op­ment re­quires greater col­lab­o­ra­tion with cus­tomers, in­gre­di­ent sup­pli­ers, and pack­ag­ing sup­pli­ers. Com­pa­nies that ef­fec­tively em­ploy PLM for col­lab­o­ra­tion and data man­age­ment will de­velop new prod­ucts faster, in­tro­duce them at lower cost, and bring them to mar­ket in less time.

Ac­cord­ing to many re­li­a­bil­ity stud­ies, roughly 80 per­cent of all as­sets fail ran­domly de­spite hav­ing rig­or­ous re­li­a­bil­ity and main­te­nance pro­grams in place. To ad­dress this ma­jor­ity of fail­ures, emerg­ing EAM so­lu­tions em­ploy IIoT tech­nolo­gies to en­able pre­dic­tive and pre­scrip­tive main­te­nance, far sur­pass­ing the ca­pa­bil­i­ties of con­tem­po­rary re­ac­tive, pre­ven­tive, and con­di­tion-based meth­ods.

and de­velop ac­cu­rate pre­dic­tive mod­els.

To­gether with higher main­te­nance ma­tu­rity comes broader busi­ness ben­e­fits that go beyond re­duc­ing main­te­nance costs. These in­clude im­proved on-time ship­ments, rev­enue, cus­tomer sat­is­fac­tion, qual­ity/yield, and safety. Al­ready ARC has seen com­pa­nies across in­dus­tries reap sig­nif­i­cant ben­e­fits from in­creas­ing their main­te­nance ma­tu­rity. Users have re­ported that mov­ing from pre­ven­tive main­te­nance to pre­dic­tive or pre­scrip­tive ap­proaches pro­vides 50 per­cent sav­ings in main­te­nance, labour and MRO ma­te­ri­als. More­over, with pre­dic­tive and pre­scrip­tive main­te­nance, near zero un­planned down­time for crit­i­cal equip­ment can be achieved.

The Trans­for­ma­tion of Chem­i­cals Sup­ply Chain

With the tra­di­tional chem­i­cal sup­ply chain lo­gis­tics model, com­pa­nies can only fo­cus on op­ti­miz­ing one com­po­nent of the sup­ply chain at a time. This ap­proach man­ages the sup­ply chain as if it is a cost cen­ter in­stead of a strate­gic, com­pet­i­tive work process. A com­pany’s sup­ply and trad­ing net­work has be­come a hive for global trade and is a liv­ing ecosys­tem of sup­ply chain part­ners and e-com­merce, con­nected through one tech­nol­ogy plat­form. In this emerg­ing busi­ness model, the fo­cus is on in­ter­ac­tive col­lab­o­ra­tion among car­ri­ers, ship­pers, for­warders, sup­pli­ers, and even cus- tomers. This ap­proach drives a pow­er­ful net­work ef­fect with the ben­e­fits of uni­ver­sal con­nec­tiv­ity among par­tic­i­pants. In­stead of mi­cro-level op­ti­miza­tion, which only al­lows for cost­sav­ings within your own sup­ply chain, the doors are open to macro level op­ti­miza­tion—find­ing those op­ti­miza­tion op­por­tu­ni­ties that lie be­tween sev­eral sys­tems that are now all con­nected to one net­work.

Con­clu­sion

Dig­i­tal­iza­tion in the chem­i­cal in­dus­try helps com­pa­nies con­tain costs, re­duce en­ergy con­sump­tion, and im­prove qual­ity and pro­duc­tiv­ity. While not ev­ery­one has de­ployed all the com­po­nents of IoT, most build­ing blocks are al­ready in place. IoT is a plat­form for in­no­va­tion for all the stake­hold­ers: end users, sup­pli­ers, and as­set own­ers. The ad­van­tages are:

• For as­set own­ers - im­proved per­for­mance, lower as­set life­cy­cle cost, and fully flex­i­ble and de­cou­pled pro­duc­tion sys­tems

• For tech­nol­ogy sup­pli­ers - the value is de­rived from im­proved pro­duc­tiv­ity and more prof­itable ser­vices busi­ness.

In­dus­trial In­ter­net of Things (IIoT) En­ables New Busi­ness Mod­els

G Gana­p­athi­ra­man is Coun­try Man­ager, ARC Ad­vi­sory Group, In­dia.

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