Iodised Salt

Consumer Voice - - The Surveillance Series -

As per Food Safety and Stan­dards (Food Prod­uct – Stan­dards and Food Ad­di­tives) Regulation, 2011, iodised salt means a crys­talline salt, white or pale, pink or light grey in colour, free from con­tam­i­na­tion with clay, grit, and other ex­tra­ne­ous adul­ter­ants and im­pu­ri­ties. It has spec­i­fied the amount of io­dine and sodium chlo­ride for iodised salt. Most peo­ple need an ad­di­tional source of io­dine as it is found in rel­a­tively small amounts in the diet. Iodi­s­a­tion is the process of for­ti­fy­ing salt for hu­man con­sump­tion with io­dine and is an ef­fec­tive strat­egy to in­crease io­dine in­take at the pop­u­la­tion level. (World Health Or­ga­ni­za­tion, WHO) Iodised salt was first in­tro­duced in the United States in 1924, mainly to tackle the grow­ing in­ci­dence of goitre, a thy­roid-en­large­ment con­di­tion.

Low-Sodium Salt

It is a spe­cially for­mu­lated salt that pro­vides lower sodium than or­di­nary salt by par­tial re­place­ment of sodium chlo­ride with potas­sium, mag­ne­sium, and cal­cium com­pounds. It is gen­er­ally con­sumed by peo­ple with symp­toms of hy­per­ten­sion and high blood pres­sure. There are no spec­i­fi­ca­tions for low sodium salt in Food Safety and Stan­dards (Food Prod­uct – Stan­dards and Food Ad­di­tives) Regulation, 2011. Hence it is be­ing sold as ‘pro­pri­etary food’.

33.77

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.