Cosmo’s Travel Beauty Spe­cial

Whether you’re red-eye­ing it for work or glo­be­trot­ting for fun, beat travel blues with our on-the-fly so­lu­tions.

Cosmopolitan (India) - - CONTENTS -

TRAVEL TRIP-UP

SWOLLEN LEGS WHAT’S THE DEAL?

The air pres­sure in a plane is way lower than nor­mal, caus­ing your in­sides to ex­pand—es­pe­cially your lower half, says Dr Ren­don.

IN-FLIGHT FIXES

Pre-flight, rub birch and cedar oils into legs—both in­crease fluid flow, says Hope Giller­man, a holis­tic health ex­pert.

Get up and walk around ev­ery cou­ple of hours to boost circulation, says Dr Graf.

TRAVEL TRIP-UP

TIGHT, FLAKY SKIN WHAT’S THE DEAL?

“The air on a plane is only 20 per­cent hu­mid­ity, while our skin’s op­ti­mal en­vi­ron­ment is 50 per­cent,” says der­ma­tol­o­gist Jean­nette Graf, MD.

IN-FLIGHT FIXES

“Drink 250ml of wa­ter an hour be­fore, dur­ing, and af­ter your flight,” says Marta Ren­don, MD, a der­ma­tol­o­gist in Boca Ra­ton. And avoid al­co­hol—it’s se­ri­ously de­hy­drat­ing.

Once an hour, mist your face with a hy­drat­ing face spray, then ap­ply a layer of lo­tion made with su­per­hy­drat­ing hyaluronic acid (like Za’s, right), says NYC der­ma­tol­o­gist De­bra Jal­i­man, MD.

TRAVEL TRIP-UP

JET LAG WHAT’S THE DEAL?

Trav­el­ling to a new time zone throws off your body’s nat­u­ral clock, which tells you when to be tired or alert, says Dr Graf. It’s most no­tice­able af­ter a red-eye flight, since you’re los­ing time (and sleep).

IN-FLIGHT FIXES

“Wear a sleep mask to block light—do­ing so re­laxes your mus­cles,” says Giller­man.

When you land, pop on a pair of sun­glasses, and if pos­si­ble, wear them for two or three hours. “Block­ing out light tricks your brain, al­low­ing it to ad­just to the new time zone,” says Giller­man.

TRAVEL TRIP-UP

BREAK­OUTS WHAT’S THE DEAL?

Dry plane air is the main cause of travel acne. Oil glands over­com­pen­sate by go­ing into over­drive, and the ex­tra se­bum gets stuck un­der the layer of rough, de­hy­drated skin, says Dr Ren­don. The high con­cen­tra­tion of on­board bac­te­ria also plays a part, says Dr Jal­i­man.

IN-FLIGHT FIXES

Don’t ig­nore your usual skin rou­tine, es­pe­cially if you’re tak­ing an overnight flight. Re­move your make-up and wash your face to un­block pores, then ap­ply a lo­tion la­belled non­come­do­genic (trans­la­tion: non–pore clog­ging), says Dr Ren­don.

“Carry hand san­i­tizer, so you don’t touch your face with dirty fin­gers,” says Dr Jal­i­man.

TRAVEL TRIP-UP

NEW TOWN, TER­RI­BLE HAIR WHAT’S THE DEAL?

Hard wa­ter (H2O that con­tains ex­cess cal­cium), causes hair to look dull and feel coarse, while soft wa­ter (typ­i­cally treated with resins like sodium) makes it flat and greasy-look­ing, says Charles Baker Stra­han, a celebrity stylist for Herbal Essences.

POST-FLIGHT FIXES

Only go­ing away for a day or two? Pre­serve the style you ar­rive with us­ing dry sham­poo. “Scratchy ho­tel pil­low­cases can rough up strands, so drape a silky slip or cami over it be­fore bed,” says Stra­han.

If you must wash—and the wa­ter is hard—rinse hair with bot­tled wa­ter first. “Hair is like a sponge,” says Stra­han. “When you pre-wet it, it can’t ab­sorb as much of the cal­cium-dense tap wa­ter.”

If the wa­ter is soft, use a vo­lu­mis­ing sham­poo and con­di­tioner, and run mousse from root to tip be­fore blow-dry­ing strands. If hair is still flat, reach for dry sham­poo. It in­creases vol­ume in­stantly, says Stra­han. Or get a swish blowdry.

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