Co­ex­is­tence is key

Down to Earth - - LETTERS - R C MISHRA PALAMPUR

pre­sented a fairly bal­anced view of the prob­lem. Oth­er­wise, most an­i­mal ac­tivists are hyp­ocrites. They pro­fess to stand­ing up for wildlife pro­tec­tion while not talk­ing about the slaugh­ter of an­i­mals for hu­man con­sump­tion. More im­por­tantly, in this par­tic­u­lar de­bate, an­i­mal ac­tivists do not re­alise the cost to agri­cul­ture. Farm­ers, who work very hard to raise crops, of­ten end up see­ing them de­stroyed by an­i­mals. The havoc caused by an­i­mals has caused many a farmer to aban­don agri­cul­ture and move to ur­ban ar­eas in search of other work. Those left be­hind do not get ad­e­quate nu­tri­tion be­cause they can af­ford only lim­ited fruit and veg­eta­bles. abreast of this side of the is­sue as well.

In my view, the hu­man-an­i­mal con­flict is due to eco­log­i­cal im­bal­ance. Her­bi­vores have run riot in vil­lages be­cause there are hardly any big car­ni­vores to keep them in check. Habi­tat loss also en­sures that there is not much for­est flora to sa­ti­ate their hunger. The so­lu­tion to the prob­lem lies in the bal­anced man­age­ment of her­bi­vores, car­ni­vores and agri­cul­ture.

VIKAS CHOUDHARY / CSE

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