'Smart City ini­tia­tive should not cre­ate dis­in­te­grated, non-in­clu­sive ci­ties’

FICCI Business Digest - - In Focus -

The Chair­man of the Par­lia­men­tary Stand­ing Com­mit­tee on Home Af­fairs, P Bhattacharya, em­pha­sised the need for cau­tion in the de­vel­op­ment of 'Smart Ci­ties' lest the pro­vi­sion of a safe city en­vi­ron­ment leads to cre­ation of class di­vi­sions be­tween per­ceived smart cit­i­zens and other cit­i­zens de­barred from avail­ing of the fa­cil­i­ties and op­por­tu­ni­ties of a 'Smart City'.

Speak­ing at FICCI's 'Home­land Se­cu­rity - 2015' con­fer­ence on the theme 'Safe & Smart Ci­ties', in New Delhi on Au­gust 25, 2105, Bhattacharya de­clared that there has been lit­tle pon­der­ing over the in­clu­sive­ness of dif­fer­ent sec­tions of so­ci­ety in a 'Smart City' and there­fore it was im­per­a­tive to en­sure that 'Smart City' should not lead to with­er­ing of a com­mon sense of be­long­ing to the na­tion by cre­at­ing iso­lated is­land of

dis­in­te­grated ci­ties. Let 'Smart Na­tion' be a fu­tur­is­tic foal of this novel en­deavor.

He said that the gov­ern­ment's '100 Smart Ci­ties' ini­tia­tive would surely in­ten­sify the process of ur­ban­i­sa­tion with half of the coun­try's pop­u­la­tion liv­ing in ur­ban ar­eas. In such a sce­nario, while 'smart city' so­lu­tions would be in­evitable, Bhattacharya ex­pressed con­cern over the fu­ture of the ru­ral pop­u­la­tion who would need fo­cused at­ten­tion to in­crease pro­duc­tion and pro­duc­tiv­ity. “This must not be lost sight of,” he said and added the ur­ban mag­net should not leave the ru­ral work­force to fend for them­selves.

While ac­knowl­edg­ing that in In­dia's con­text 'Smart Polic­ing' may re­quire not only com­pre­hen­sive mod­erni­sa­tion of the struc­ture and op­er­a­tion of po­lice forces, Bhattacharya un­der­lined the need for a more flex­i­ble le­gal frame­work. “Tra­di­tional laws will need to be re­placed by mod­ern po­lice laws that will recog­nise newer crimes and en­sure ap­pro­pri­ate fo­cus on crimes re­lated to cy­ber se­cu­rity like in­for­ma­tion and iden­tity thefts, breach of data pri­vacy and, hack­ing of web­sites and net­works, he em­pha­sised.

Bhattacharya pointed out that the com­po­nents, sys­tems, net­works and ar­chi­tec­ture were im­por­tant to the se­cu­rity de­sign and re­li­a­bil­ity of the 'Smart City' communications so­lu­tions. “But it is im­pos­si­ble to pre­dict and pre­vent un­de­sir­able emer­gen­cies and one must be pre­pared with a

One of the big­gest con­cerns about smart ci­ties is that the sen­sors in the equip­ment can be hacked and fed with fake data, which could be used for all man­ner of mis­chief, like caus­ing sig­nal fail­ures that shut down sub­ways or al­low­ing con­tam­i­nants into the wa­ter sup­ply, etc.

proper re­sponse plan, he said, adding that since the ra­pid­ity of the re­sponse was crit­i­cal dur­ing emer­gency sit­u­a­tions, it was im­per­a­tive to en­sure that a 'Smart City' is in­su­lated as much as pos­si­ble from the im­pact of un­pre­dictable dis­as­ters.

On the oc­ca­sion, the dig­ni­taries re­leased the FICCI-EY re­port ti­tled S.M.A.R.T. polic­ing for smart ci­ties.

P.V. Rama Sas­try, IGP, NIA, Min­istry of Home Af­fairs, Gov­ern­ment of In­dia and Sec­re­tary, IPS As­so­ci­a­tion, in his re­marks, stated that peace and har­mony were es­sen­tial fac­tors for sus­tain­ing the coun­try's eco­nomic growth. But se­cu­rity threats loom large and un­less th­ese are ad­dressed in right earnest there was a se­ri­ous threat of de­rail­ing the growth en­gine. He added that peo­ples' col­lab­o­ra­tion was to de­vel­op­ing a peo­ple's po­lice which was the de­mand for the 21st cen­tury.

Dr. Arbind Prasad, Di­rec­tor Gen­eral, FICCI, said there are var­i­ous kinds of se­cu­rity threats in Smart Ci­ties, par­tic­u­larly cy­ber-at­tacks can bring the en­tire city struc­ture to a stand­still. One of the big­gest con­cerns about smart ci­ties is that the sen­sors in the equip­ment can be hacked and fed with fake data, which could be used for all man­ner of mis­chief, like caus­ing sig­nal fail­ures that shut down sub­ways or al­low­ing con­tam­i­nants into the wa­ter sup­ply, etc. In ad­di­tion to new se­cu­rity con­cerns in Smart Ci­ties, the tra­di­tional risks like that of as­sas­si­na­tions, kid­nap­pings, hi­jack­ing, bomb scares, etc. can­not be ruled out com­pletely. Some of th­ese have been po­tent threats to in­ter­nal se­cu­rity in view of the deadly na­ture of ter­ror­ist at­tacks th­ese days and that ter­ror­ist or­gan­i­sa­tions are in­creas­ingly re­sort­ing to use of new tech­nolo­gies to in­stil fear into the com­mon cit­i­zen.

Vikas Aggarwal, Ex­ec­u­tive Di­rec­tor, EY, in his theme pre­sen­ta­tion, stated that Smart Ci­ties' need to ad­dress the chal­lenges us­ing S.M.A.R.T. po­lice force, which can pre­vent ac­ci­dents, emer­gen­cies as well as crime. Smart po­lice is a mod­ern po­lice that can re­late to the cit­i­zens of a smart city and can also act ef­fi­ciently us­ing IT en­able­ment. Smart po­lice should be ca­pa­ble of pro­tect­ing the city's phys­i­cal and IT in­fras­truc­ture. Min­i­mum re­sponse time is ex­pected from smart po­lice in case of an emer­gency. The po­lice

also needs to make ef­forts to re­cover the city from any ma­jor in­ci­dent. In or­der to help cit­i­zens in all as­pects, the po­lice needs to be smart and ag­ile.

Em­pha­sis­ing the need for greater pub­lic-pri­vate part­ner­ship for the im­ple­men­ta­tion of smart ci­ties in In­dia, Ashok Bajpai, Man­ag­ing Di­rec­tor, G4S In­dia, said, "Let us not rein­vent the wheel, we should learn from coun­tries like Sin­ga­pore, UK and U.S., the im­ple­men­ta­tion of best prac­tices. In Lon­don, for ex­am­ple, there are over 17000 cam­eras in­stalled af­ter the 2005 bomb­ing. It is one of the dens­est ci­ties in terms of se­cu­rity. In In­dia too we need greater pub­lic-pri­vate part­ner­ship to en­sure this kind of im­ple­men­ta­tion of smart in­fras­truc­ture. It is all about the col­lab­o­ra­tion be­tween gov­ern­ment in­fras­truc­ture and smart peo­ple at all lev­els. The time has come for prac­tices like pre­ven­tive polic­ing and pre­dic­tive an­a­lyt­ics to be im­ple­mented. We should not be re­ac­tive but proac­tive. This in­volves pub­licpri­vate partnerships to work in four ar­eas namely city sur­veil­lance, build­ing se­cu­rity, ar­chi­tec­ture and phys­i­cal se­cu­rity in pub­lic spa­ces to en­sure safety."

The FICCI-E&Y re­port ex­plores the pos­si­bil­ity of shift­ing from tra­di­tional po­lice sys­tems to a SMART polic­ing struc­ture. It ex­plores in depth In­dia's polic­ing ar­chi­tec­ture, and com­pares and cor­re­lates best prac­tices from around the world and analy­ses var­i­ous com­po­nents of an­a­lyt­ics and in­tel­li­gence re­quired by mod­ern en­force­ment agen­cies, and un­der­lines ini­tia­tives that need to be taken for the tran­si­tion. The re­port high­lights the use of mod­ern tech­nol­ogy in solv­ing im­por­tant and com­plex se­cu­rity is­sues of the coun­try.

L to R: Dr. Arbind Prasad, Di­rec­tor Gen­eral, FICCI; P Bhattacharya, Chair­man of the Par­lia­men­tary Stand­ing Com­mit­tee on Home Af­fairs; P.V. Rama Sas­try, IGP, NIA, Min­istry of Home Af­fairs, Gov­ern­ment of In­dia and Sec­re­tary, IPS As­so­ci­a­tion and Sumeet Gupta, Di­rec­tor, FICCI.

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