FIELD IN FO

Gadgets and Gizmos (India) - - DIGITAL LIFE - TEXT & PHO­TO­GRAPH BY RA­JWANT RAWAT

When you take a pho­to­graph, the ob­jects ly­ing within the fo­cal length of the lens is sharper in con­trast to those ei­ther fur­ther away from the lens or closer to the cam­era. The range be­tween the sharpest near­est and far­thest points is called “depth of field”. You can cre­atively use depth of field in pho­tog­ra­phy. Knowl­edge of depth of field can make your pic­tures in­ter­est­ing. For in­stance, by putting your sub­ject in sharp fo­cus, while si­mul­ta­ne­ously en­sur­ing the back­ground is out of fo­cus, you will cre­ate a picture whose sub­ject is not clut­tered by the back­ground.

Fo­cus plays a sig­nif­i­cant part in how good a picture is. By us­ing depth of field, you can play around with the ar­eas in a pho­to­graph that you want to draw at­ten­tion to. With creative use of de­fo­cus, you can add an aura of mys­tery to a picture (much like in a soft-fo­cus pho­to­graph) or cap­ture a glo­ri­ous land­scape with­out parts of it be­ing blurry.

The magic of how to con­trol depth of field lies in your abil­ity to use the aper­ture of the cam­era. The sim­ple rule is that open­ing up the aper­ture de­creases the depth of field, mak­ing it smaller pro­duces the op­po­site ef­fect. A smaller aper­ture, say f11, will give you sharp­ness over a greater area

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