DE­TER­RING CAR THIEVES

THE SOUND OF CAR ALARMS GO­ING OFF AT THE TOUCH ARE COM­MON ENOUGH. HOW DO THESE CAR PRO­TEC­TION SYS­TEMS DE­TECT IN­TRU­SION?

Gadgets and Gizmos (India) - - KNOW TECH - TEXT AND GRAPH­ICS BY SAN­TOSH KUSH­WAHA

In a car alarm sys­tem, a siren is con­nected to a few sen­sors to en­sure that as soon as a per­son opens a door, a sig­nal is trans­mit­ted to the wailer from the sen­sor. Cur­rent car alarms are more so­phis­ti­cated in terms of how they func­tion and the safety fea­tures they come with. There are com­po­nents or de­vices like ra­dio re­ceivers, mo­tion de­tec­tors, pres­sure sen­sors, aux­il­iary bat­ter­ies, etc, that en­able the alarm to func­tion ef­fi­ciently, even if the main bat­tery of the car fails.

The Brain

The main part of the alarm sys­tem called the brain, a com­puter con­trol unit, is de­signed and used to mon­i­tor ev­ery­thing that hap­pens re­gard­ing the alarm. It trig­gers the alarm when re­quired. It is con­nected to all the sen­sors that are in­stalled in a car.

Car-alarm Trans­mit­ters

Most car alarm sys­tems come with some sort of por­ta­ble key­chain trans­mit­ter. With this de­vice, we can send in­struc­tions to the brain to con­trol the alarm sys­tem re­motely. This works in ba­si­cally the same way as ra­dio-con­trolled toys.

Shock Sen­sor

So­phis­ti­cated mod­ern-day sen­sor alarm sys­tems make use of shock sen­sors to en­sure that thieves re­turn empty handed. Shock sen­sor alarms run on the con­cept of mo­tion strength. Sig­nals to the brain of the sys­tem by the sen­sors de­ter­mine the strength of the mo­tion and can de­tect whether some­one is try­ing to push or move the car. The brain of the sys­tem im­me­di­ately gets the horn honk­ing or ac­ti­vates the au­dio sys­tem to start play­ing loudly in or­der to ward off the un­wanted per­son/thief.

Alarm re­ciever

In­ter­con­nected wires

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