Food Quiz

How nutri­tion savvy are you? An­swer the fol­low­ing ques­tions to nd out. Some have more than one cor­rect an­swer.

Health & Nutrition - - CONTENTS -

Check your nutri­tion knowl­edge

1 Fish is a good source of (a) vi­ta­min C, (b) pro­tein, (c) beta carotene, (d) omega-3 fats.

2 Nuts are high in (a) calo­ries, (b) fat, (c) choles­terol, (d) all.

3 True or false: ‘ Multi­grain’ breads are al­ways ‘whole-grain’.

4 Rank the fol­low­ing foods for potas­sium, from most to least: (a) a cup of or­ange juice, (b) a cup of yo­ghurt, (c) a medium ba­nana, (d) a cup of broc­coli.

5 Which of the fol­low­ing con­tain cal­cium: (a) figs, (b) al­monds, (c) soy­beans, (d) col­lard greens.

6 Which does not con­tain the an­tiox­i­dant ly­copene: (a) car­rots, (b) tomato sauce, (c) wa­ter­melon, (d) ketchup.

7 True or false: Free-range chicken is more health­ful and guar­an­teed to be pro­duced more hu­manely than other chicken.

8 A la­bel that lists trans fats as ‘0’ means (a) the food con­tains no trans fat, (b) it con­tains no par­tially hy­dro­genated oil, (c) it has less than 0.5 grams of trans fats per serv­ing, (d) it con­tains no sat­u­rated fat, (e) it is healthy for you.

9 Rank the fol­low­ing fast foods for their sodium, from most to least: (a) McDon­ald’s large French fries, (b) a Dunkin’ Donuts corn muf­fin, (c) a Burger King Veggie Burger, (d) a large Burger King choco­late shake.

10 True or false: But­ter has fewer calo­ries than olive oil.

11 Which does not con­tain fi­bre: (a) broc­coli, (b) oat­meal, (c) steak, (d) an ap­ple, (e) baked beans.

12 Which pasta is high­est in fi­bre: (a) spinach pasta, (b) whole wheat pasta, (c) fresh pasta (d) ‘al dente’ pasta.

13 True or false: Honey and brown sugar are more health­ful than ta­ble sugar.

14 To lower blood pres­sure, you should (a) eat more fruits and veg­eta­bles, (b) eat low-fat/ non-fat dairy foods, (c) use less salt, (d) take a potas­sium sup­ple­ment.

15 How much fi­bre should you aim for ev­ery day? (a) 5 grams, (b) 10 to 15 grams, (c) 20 to 35 grams, (d) 50 grams.

16 Vi­ta­min D is found in (a) eggs, (b) chicken, (c) milk, (d) fatty fish, (e) mush­rooms.

AN­SWERS

1 (b and d). Fish has about 20 grams of pro­tein in 3 ounces; fatty fish (such as salmon, sar­dines, black cod) also pro­vide omega-3 fats, which may re­duce the risk of car­dio­vas­cu­lar dis­ease and other dis­or­ders.

2 (a and b). Nuts sup­ply 160 (cashews, pis­ta­chios) to 200 (macadamia) calo­ries per ounce. While they are high in fat (14 to 20 grams per ounce), most of it is healthy mo­noun­sat­u­rated fat.

3 False. ‘ Multi­grain’ means more than one grain is present – and the pri­mary in­gre­di­ent is usu­ally re­fined wheat flour. Whole-grain flour con­tains the bran and the germ, and so is rich in vi­ta­mins, min­er­als, and fi­bre. Re­fin­ing wheat re­moves nu­tri­ents, and even when it’s ‘en­riched’, only some are added back.

4 (b,a, c, e, d). While ba­nanas are an ex­cel­lent source of potas­sium, with 420 mil­ligrams, other

‘Multi­grain’ means more than one grain is present – and the pri­mary in­gre­di­ent is usu­ally re­fined wheat flour. Whole­grain flour con­tains the bran and the germ, and so is rich in vi­ta­mins, min­er­als, and fi­bre.

foods have even more: Yo­ghurt, 530 mil­ligrams; or­ange juice, 500; broc­coli, 460. Also rich in potas­sium are toma­toes, apri­cots, spinach, beets, prune juice, pota­toes, lentils, soy­beans, nuts, and sun­flower seeds.

5 (all). Dairy foods are the best sources but some plant foods pro­vide cal­cium too, par­tic­u­larly soy­beans and leafy greens.

6 (a). Ly­copene is a carotenoid that gives toma­toes and other foods their red colour and has been linked to re­duced risk of prostate and other can­cers. Car­rots are high in beta carotene, a re­lated com­pound. Pro­cess­ing toma­toes into sauce, paste, juice, and even ketchup makes ly­copene more avail­able to the body. Guava, pa­paya, and pink grape­fruit are other sources.

7 False and false. Freerange chicken is nei­ther more nutri­tious nor safer from Sal­monella than con­ven­tional chicken. All poul­try can be con­tam­i­nated with dis­ease-caus­ing bac­te­ria. ‘Free range’ means only that the birds have ac­cess to an out­door pen, not that they nec­es­sar­ily go out­side. And if they do, it may just be a small con­crete yard.

8 (c). Be­cause of a la­bel­ing loop­hole, a ‘trans fat free’ food may still con­tain small amounts of par­tially hy­dro­genated oil, the source of artery--

dam­ag­ing trans fats. And th­ese small amounts can add up, es­pe­cially since stan­dard serv­ing sizes are small.

9 (c,b, d, a). Most fast food is very high in sodium – even items you might think are not.

10 True. Olive oil has 120 calo­ries and 13.5 grams of fat per tbsp; but­ter, 100 calo­ries and 11.5 grams of fat. But this small dif­fer­ence is out­weighed by the fact that but­ter­fat is highly sat­u­rated. Olive oil, rich in mo­noun­sat­u­rated fat, is a health­ier choice.

11 (c). Fi­bre, which im­proves blood sugar con­trol, low­ers choles­terol and helps pre­vent con­sti­pa­tion, is found only in plant foods.

12 (b). Whole-wheat pasta con­tains about 6 grams of fi­bre per cooked cup, three times as much as reg­u­lar pasta, which is made from re­fined semolina flour. Flavoured pasta, in­clud­ing spinach, has lit­tle or no ex­tra fi­bre. Fresh pasta of­fers no nu­tri­tional ad­van­tage over dried. Cook­ing pasta does not af­fect fi­bre. Pas­tas made from other whole grains, such as quinoa, are other higher-fi­bre choices.

13 False. Sugar is sugar, and no form of it of­fers sig­nif­i­cant nu­tri­tional ad­van­tages. Brown sugar is white sugar with a lit­tle mo­lasses for colour­ing. Honey is sweeter than ta­ble sugar, but any ad­di­tional nu­tri­ents in it are in­signif­i­cant.

14 (a,b, c). An eat­ing plan that em­pha­sizes fruits, veg­eta­bles, and low­fat/ non-fat dairy foods (the DASH diet) has been proven to lower blood pres­sure – even more so when sodium is also re­duced. No one should take a potas­sium sup­ple­ment or use a potas­sium-based salt sub­sti­tute un­less ad­vised to by a doc­tor.

15 (c). 20 to 35 grams, de­pend­ing on your to­tal daily calo­ries. A cup of raisin bran with a ba­nana (10 grams), a cup of broc­coli (6 grams), a pear (5 grams), a sweet potato with skin (5 grams), and a slice of whole-wheat bread (2 grams) get you within that range.

16 (a,c, d, e). Milk is for­ti­fied with D and is the ma­jor di­etary source, with 100 IU per cup. Fatty fish is nat­u­rally rich in D; egg yolks and some mush­rooms con­tain small amounts. Or­ange juice, soy milk, mar­garine, yo­ghurt, and break­fast ce­real may also be for­ti­fied.

Olive oil has 120 calo­ries and 13.5 grams of fat per tbsp; but­ter, 100 calo­ries and 11.5 grams of fat. But this small dif­fer­ence is out­weighed by the fact that but­ter­fat is highly sat­u­rated. Olive oil is a health­ier choice.

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