Food Note

Find out how the trend­ing blood group diet im­pacts your body…

Health & Nutrition - - CONTENTS -

Diet for your blood type

What’s com­mon be­tween Ak­shay Ku­mar, Demi Moore, San­jay Dutt, Miranda Kerr, Taapsee Pannu and Courteney Cox? Be­sides be­ing known for their fit bod­ies, they all fol­low the blood group diet… What ex­actly is the blood group diet? Ac­cord­ing to Tripti Gupta, founder, iPink The Color Of Health, the blood group diet is when you are eat­ing ac­cord­ing to your blood type —O, A, B and AB. This diet, in­vented by Dr Peter D’Adamo, in his book ‘Eat Right For Your Type’, sug­gests that di­ets can be fol­lowed by an in­di­vid­ual as per his/ her blood group. The chem­i­cal re­ac­tion to digest the food be­gins soon af­ter in­ges­tion. This re­ac­tion takes place be­tween the lectin (sug­arbind­ing pro­teins) present in the food and the blood, which has a di­rect ef­fect on the or­gans of the body.

Ad­van­tages Of The Diet

Chan­nel­iz­ing your diet based on the blood group can help you be­come aware of your ex­act body needs. It pro­vides sat­is­fac­tion from within, thus min­i­miz­ing ex­ter­nal crav­ings. If your diet is work­ing well for you, then your body will al­ways be self-suf­fi­cient and you won’t crave for food all the time, thus help­ing in weight­loss too.

Dis­ad­van­tages

How­ever, it is not rec­om­mended to com­pletely rely on the blood group diet, be­cause apart from the blood group, there are a lot of fac­tors that would in­flu­ence a per­son’s diet such as ge­netic fac­tors, life­style etc. Most In­di­ans are veg­e­tar­i­ans, in which case it’s very hard to fol­low only a blood group diet. For ex­am­ple, O blood group peo­ple should eat a lot of fish and meat, for their pro­tein in­take. But if the per­son is veg­e­tar­ian, it will be very hard to sub­sti­tute the pro­tein in­take. Even if they have pro­tein from veg­e­tar­ian sources, many peo­ple are in­tol­er­ant to many beans and dairy prod­ucts.

It pro­vides sat­is­fac­tion from within, thus min­i­miz­ing ex­ter­nal crav­ings. If your diet is work­ing well for you, then your body will al­ways be self-suf­fi­cient and won’t crave for food all the time, thus help­ing in weight-loss too.

Re­port­edly, type A peo­ple are more im­mune to heart dis­ease, cancer and di­a­betes. It is par­tic­u­larly im­por­tant for the sen­si­tive type A peo­ple to get their food in as nat­u­ral a state as pos­si­ble.

Know­ing your blood type, test­ing your ge­net­ics, and find­ing out what you are al­ler­gic to, will also help.

Di­ets As Per The Blood Group

Nev­er­the­less, here’s ex­plain­ing the food to eat for dif­fer­ent blood groups.

O

Un­like other blood group types, O blood group peo­ple have high stom­ach-acid con­tent. Thus, they can digest meat eas­ily, and are phys­i­cally more ac­tive. Opt For: A high pro­tein diet - lean meat, fish, egg etc. Drink a lot of water, as with pro­tein, water in­take should also be more to help ab­sorb it. Con­sume a lot of iron, as iron helps ab­sorb the pro­teins and other nu­tri­ents in the body. Iron can be con­sumed in the form of leafy veg­eta­bles too. Con­sume more al­ka­line fruits like berries, raisins, ap­ples, mango, ba­nana, peach etc, as the stom­ach already has a high acid con­tent. Avoid: Sup­ple­ment-based di­ets (vi­ta­min tablets or pro­tein pow­ders). Cit­rus fruits. Dairy prod­ucts but you can en­joy but­ter, soymilk, goat cheese, feta and moz­zarella cheese in small amounts, as dairy trig­gers di­ges­tive is­sues in the body.

A

Re­port­edly, type A peo­ple are more im­mune to heart dis­ease, cancer and di­a­betes. It is par­tic­u­larly im­por­tant for the sen­si­tive type A peo­ple to get their food in as nat­u­ral a state as pos­si­ble. They also have low acid con­tent com­pared to other blood groups and there­fore, will find it dif­fi­cult to digest meat. Opt For: Fruit juices. It keeps the body hy­drated and also suits this blood type. Cit­rus fruits. Soya, tofu and nuts to com­plete the re­quire­ment of pro­teins. Veg­eta­bles to pro­vide min­er­als, vi­ta­mins and an­tiox­i­dants, and the pro­tein re­quire­ment can be ful­filled by beans. Avoid: Dairy prod­ucts, as

they are poorly di­gested by them. Pota­toes, sweet pota­toes, yam, cab­bage, toma­toes and pep­per, as type A peo­ple are sen­si­tive to the lectins in them. Fruits like man­goes, pa­paya and or­anges. They can cause ex­tra stress to the di­ges­tive sys­tem.

B

The type B diet is bal­anced and whole­some. B blood group peo­ple can tol­er­ate all kinds of food, and can in­clude a wide va­ri­ety of foods in their diet. They need to eat ev­ery­thing – veg­gies, fruits, meat, fish and dairy.

AB

Ac­cord­ing to Dr Peter D’Adamo, be­ing the rarest blood type, AB group peo­ple have the qual­i­ties of both A and B. They should try to keep their pH neu­tral by con­sum­ing a mix of both groups. Opt For: Eggs, fish and dairy prod­ucts as they are very ben­e­fi­cial for them. Legumes like beans, soy, peanuts and green lentils. Neu­tral veg­eta­bles like beet, broc­coli, cel­ery, cu­cum­ber and egg­plant (brin­jal). More fruit juices to hy­drate the body. Avoid: Red meat and chicken.

-RH

Peo­ple with neg­a­tive RH fac­tor (any blood group) tend to have a weak im­mune sys­tem, so their abil­ity to digest becomes dif­fi­cult. The nour­ish­ment and ab­sorp­tion level is also low. While com­par­ing pos­i­tives to neg­a­tives, it is al­ways ob­served that peo­ple with neg­a­tive blood groups take longer to achieve pos­i­tive re­sults, es­pe­cially if they are try­ing to cor­rect their med­i­cal con­di­tions. For such peo­ple, the diet al­ways has to be more con­cen­trated. Be it fruits, juices, veg­eta­bles or meat, they need more of ev­ery­thing for their body to get the re­quired nu­tri­ents. HARSHA ADVANI

For neg­a­tive blood group peo­ple, the diet al­ways has to be more con­cen­trated. Be it fruits, juices, veg­eta­bles or meat, they need more of ev­ery­thing for their body to get the re­quired nu­tri­ents.

Ak­shay Ku­mar San­jay Dutt Taapsee Pannu Courteney Cox Demi Moore

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