A Slice Of Life

In­dus­tri­al­ist Aneel Mu­rarka, MD of Mirachem In­dus­tries, shares with us his ex­pe­ri­ence of a near-death road ac­ci­dent, and how he came out of it in a record time…

Health & Nutrition - - CONTENTS - HARSHA ADVANI

Dr Aneel Mu­rarka on sur­viv­ing a fa­tal ac­ci­dent

That Fate­ful Day…

“It was Au­gust 2010. I was in Jaipur with my fam­ily (wife and son), and was go­ing for an of­fi­cial meet­ing to Delhi. I was trav­el­ling via the JaipurDelhi high­way. Af­ter the meet­ing, I was sup­posed to leave for Mum­bai. “It was driz­zling, and we were on the high­way. I had reached a vil­lage called Dharuhera. It was a one-way route, and sud­denly, I saw a truck coming from the op­po­site side. And I re­alised some­thing would hap­pen. I was on a call but im­me­di­ately put my phone in­side my pocket; I thought my mo­bile should be safe.”

The Head-On Col­li­sion

“The only thing I re­call from those ex­act mo­ments now – a cou­ple of sec­onds af­ter the truck col­lided with my car – was that I was not sure if I would sur­vive. All I did was say a prayer to the almighty. I told Him, ‘Please take care of my son, my son is my soul and my heart, and he is very young’. “I do not rec­ol­lect what

hap­pened af­ter that. Ap­par­ently, my driver ran away af­ter the ac­ci­dent. And when I gained con­scious­ness (af­ter an hour), I was in­side a po­lice van. I was suf­fer­ing in pain and could barely speak, but some­how man­aged to re­quest the cops to call an air am­bu­lance, to take me to Mum­bai or Jaipur or Delhi. But no one heard me. They just didn’t care and dumped me in­side a mu­nic­i­pal hospi­tal and went away.”

Hospi­tal With No Doc­tors

“Be­ing a Sun­day, there was no doc­tor in the hospi­tal, and my con­di­tion was pa­thetic. The pain in my chest was un­bear­able. I was not bleed­ing from any­where, just had a few scratches on my body, and maybe be­cause of that, no one took me se­ri­ously. Even I felt there was noth­ing se­ri­ous and I might get up in some­time. But my chest pain only ag­gra­vated. “Fi­nally, the hospi­tal staff de­cided to do a city scan, x-ray and an MRI, af­ter my re­peated complaints of chest

pain. That is when they found out that eight out of my nine ribs were bro­ken on my right lung, and two on my left. And one of the ribs from my right lung had pierced right in­side the lung, be­cause of which I had ma­jor in­ter­nal bleed­ing. Apart from that, I also had a few col­lar bone frac­tures. “There was no med­i­cal as­sis­tant too, be­ing a Sun­day, and I had no idea what would hap­pen next.”

A Ray Of Hope

“Peo­ple say, God helps in mys­te­ri­ous ways. That day, I re­alised that he does! I was ly­ing down in the hospi­tal bed in pain, clue­less how I would sur­vive this, when a com­pounder came to check my re­ports. He was shocked! As I couldn’t speak be­cause of the pain, I re­quested him, by scrib­bling on a piece of pa­per with my left hand, as only my left hand fin­gers moved. I wrote ‘Please talk to my fam­ily physi­cian’ and di­alled his num­ber and put the phone on speaker. The com­pounder then ex­plained the sit­u­a­tion to my doc­tor. And the doc­tor’s re­sponse

was, ‘Aneel, lis­ten to me very care­fully. I am telling this per­son to do some­thing now, it will be very painful, but please bear it’. I was scared, but had no other choice. On the speaker from Mum­bai, the doc­tor started to guide the com­pounder, who be­gan to fol­low his in­struc­tions.

“He slit my shirt, to touch all my ribs one by one, and ex­plained to the doc­tor what he sensed. Af­ter a mo­ment, he felt some gap and my doc­tor told him to hold that spot… “There was no anaes­the­sia, medicine, or sur­gi­cal scis­sors. All he had was a knife, which he cleaned with the spirit avail­able. Then, as ad­vised by the doc­tor, he gave me a deep cut near my ribs where he felt the gap. The mo­ment he did that, blood spilled out, like some­one had opened a tap. “I was later told by the doc­tors that out of the five litres of blood in the hu­man body, al­most three litres

“The only thing I re­call from those ex­act mo­ments now – a cou­ple of sec­onds af­ter the truck col­lided with my car – was that I was not sure if I would sur­vive. All I did was say a prayer to the almighty. I told Him, ‘Please take care of my son’.”

were drained out that day, with that lit­tle scar. And only be­cause of that scar, I am alive to­day. That cut was nec­es­sary to change the flow of my blood, or else the in­ter­nal bleed­ing would have def­i­nitely killed me. “Af­ter the com­pounder gave me the cut, I soon be­came un­con­scious. And when I gained con­scious­ness, I was in an am­bu­lance. My physi­cian had co­or­di­nated with my fa­ther (in Mum­bai) and un­cle (in Jaipur), who came all the way to take me back to Jaipur. The jour­ney in the am­bu­lance was also very dra­matic - blood was drip­ping down con­tin­u­ously, and I had IV on the other hand. Some­how, we reached Jaipur at 11 p.m in the night and they ad­mit­ted me to the For­tis Hospi­tal there. Dr Deepak Yadu­van­shi treated me there. That is when my wife and son were in­formed about my ac­ci­dent, and they rushed to see me.”

The Ven­ti­la­tor Dilemma

“That night, I was in a very crit­i­cal stage – the doc­tor in­formed my fa­ther that they might have to put me on the ven­ti­la­tor. I saw my fa­ther walk­ing rest­lessly out­side the ICU. “Yet again, I asked for a writ­ing pad and re­quested the doc­tor say­ing, ‘If there is life in me, I will sur­vive, like I have done till now. Please don’t put me on the ven­ti­la­tor’. I felt if I came this far, noth­ing will go wrong in one night. Some­how, the doc­tor un­der­stood what I felt, and fi­nally agreed. By the grace of God, that night passed smoothly, and the night af­ter that too, thanks to the team of doc­tors in For­tis.”

Re­cov­ery

“Af­ter a week-long treat­ment, I grad­u­ally started to recover. My col­lar bone frac­tures and in­juries in the leg started to heal. But the most dif­fi­cult task was the ribs. I still had 10 bro­ken ribs and even a slight cough or sneeze, was killing me... “It’s been seven years, but the mem­ory of that pain is still so fresh. It still scares me. I hope no­body ever goes through that. “In­ci­den­tally, bro­ken ribs heal on their own, there is no treat­ment for that. So all I was given was some painkillers, and ad­vised to lay straight on an el­e­vated bed. Af­ter a week, the doc­tors and my fam­ily mem­bers started to en­cour­age me to stand up on my feet. I was mo­ti­vated to walk around the lobby. But a sin­gle step would take away all my strength – even breath­ing nor­mally was the most dif­fi­cult task for me.”

Deadly Treat­ment

“In a few days, came the worst but the most ben­e­fi­cial part of my treat­ment - the spirom­e­ter. It is an in­stru­ment with three balls, and I was sup­posed to take a deep breath and blow

“I re­quested the doc­tor say­ing, ‘If there is life in me, I will sur­vive, like I have done till now. Please don’t put me on the ven­ti­la­tor’. I felt if I came this far, noth­ing will go wrong in one night.”

in­side. With ev­ery blow, the balls were sup­posed to go up. “Even for a nor­mal per­son, it’s a very good ex­er­cise for the lungs, but for me, the pain, with ev­ery sin­gle blow, was beyond imag­i­na­tion. Doc­tors told me, ‘Just 20 counts in a day, and you will start re­cov­er­ing’. “The thought of re­cov­ery and go­ing back home mo­ti­vated me, and I took my first blow. I was fin­ished! My hospi­tal stay con­tin­ued for 20 days, and the day I could take 20 blows, I was dis­charged. Still not re­cov­ered fully, but I had enough strength to take the air pres­sure in the flight. “Fi­nally, I was in Mum­bai. The feel­ing of coming back home made me very op­ti­mistic. I now knew that I would def­i­nitely sur­vive and be on my feet soon. Just that thought gave me strength and I de­cided to leave my wheel­chair at the door…”

Strength Of Mind

“I started us­ing my spirom­e­ter, so that the ribs would come back to nor­malcy, es­pe­cially the one that pierced in­side my right lung. Along with that, I had to do some breath­ing ex­er­cises and take painkillers. “Slowly, I was asked to blow 50 times daily and be on the bed all day. My wife gave me all the sup­port, and prayed for me. But now that I was re­stricted to the bed, my empty mind be­came a devil’s home. I de­cided that by Novem­ber, I had to be on my toes, for my son’s birth­day. I wanted to throw a big party for him, and walk on that day. “I started blowing 50 counts daily and in­creased it to 100 to 200 and then 700 a day! That was the turn­ing point in my treat­ment. It was very painful for a week, but once I reached 700, it be­came a cake walk! I did it re­li­giously, and fol­lowed my pre­scribed liq­uid diet (no solids, as any move­ment in­side the body was painful). “As soon as my ribs started to heal, my phys­io­ther­apy for the col­lar­bone frac­tures be­gan. Af­ter a month, I was ad­vised to walk 10 rounds in­side the house, but I started to take 30-40 strolls as I wanted to recover quickly. “A strong mind is ex­tremely im­por­tant to recover from any ill­ness. Three months passed. I threw the party in Novem­ber, started work­ing and even driv­ing my son to school. I was ad­vised some ex­er­cises which I still fol­low – mainly car­dio and yoga, but no weights.”

“The feel­ing of coming back home made me very op­ti­mistic. I now knew that I would def­i­nitely sur­vive and be on my feet soon. Just that thought gave me strength and I de­cided to leave my wheel­chair at the door…”

A Healthy Me Now

“Now I lead a healthy life, with no re­stric­tions. Just one small thing, I can­not spend more time in a cold place, as my lungs hurt. Apart from that, I can live a nor­mal life. “When I was re­cov­er­ing, my wife, son and ev­ery­one in the fam­ily sup­ported me equally. They never treated me as a pa­tient.”

A Su­pe­rior Power

“In­ci­den­tally, famed as­trologer San­jay Ju­mani had told me three years prior to the ac­ci­dent that th­ese few months (when the ac­ci­dent hap­pened) will be very hard for me and I needed to be care­ful. But I didn’t pay any at­ten­tion, as I didn’t be­lieve in it then. But I re­alised my mis­take later. The Uni­verse does have some pow­ers, and as­trol­ogy, I now be­lieve, is a sci­ence, and I re­spect it. “My outlook to­wards life changed com­pletely af­ter the ac­ci­dent. Those two months in bed, all I thought was what if I was not able to make it, what if the com­pounder didn’t give me that cut, what if this and that… “Life has given me a sec­ond chance, and now I want to do some­thing for mankind. To­day, I have a char­i­ta­ble trust and we are try­ing to do our bit to make this world a bet­ter place for peo­ple to live in.”

“My outlook to­wards life changed com­pletely af­ter the ac­ci­dent. Now I want to do some­thing for mankind. To­day, I have a char­i­ta­ble trust and we are try­ing to do our bit to make this world a bet­ter place for peo­ple to live in.”

With fa­ther & brother With wife Sangeeta & son Sid­haant

Spirom­e­ter

At the Shoor Veer awards

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