Healthy Eat­ing

Nope! What’s more, peo­ple with di­a­betes can eat them too.

Health & Nutrition - - CONTENTS - LUKE COUTINHO In­te­gra­tive & Lifestyle Medicine, Holis­tic Nutri­tion & Founder – Purenu­tri­tion.me

How nu­tri­tious are man­goes?

Ev­ery year, right about this time in sum­mer, my mail­box is flooded with ques­tions about whether or not one should eat man­goes. “I have di­a­betes, will man­goes cause my blood su­gar lev­els to rise?” “Man­goes are so sweet, won’t they make me put on weight?” “Are man­goes healthy to eat?” One shouldn’t be scared of a fruit - you shouldn’t be scared of any­thing that grows nat­u­rally. What you should be scared of is ev­ery­thing that comes pack­aged, of ev­ery­thing that’s pro­cessed, of your poor lifestyle choices.

MIGHTYMANGO

Man­goes are a rich source of vi­ta­mins C, A, E and K, and most of the B vi­ta­mins ex­cept vi­ta­min B12. Man­goes also have traces of Omega 3 and Omega 6 and are loaded with min­er­als and fi­bre. One ripe mango will have ap­prox­i­mately 29-32 grams of fruit su­gar and a gly­caemic load of just 10. So, while you don’t have to be scared of man­goes, you do have to be scared of overeat­ing them. This holds true for vir­tu­ally any­thing that’s good for you – too much of it can have ad­verse ef­fects.

DI­A­BETES-FRIENDLY TOO!

This rule ap­plies in di­a­betes too – you can eat man­goes, but in mod­er­a­tion. De­pend­ing on your blood su­gar lev­els, you can have one mango or half-a-mango quite safely. Man­goes are also rich in fi­bre, which doesn’t al­low your blood su­gar lev­els to rise too high. I also al­ways tell peo­ple who are try­ing to con­trol their blood su­gar to have some seeds and nuts with it or right af­ter it, so that the lev­els are kept un­der check. Other than the vi­ta­mins and fi­bre, man­goes also con­tain a sub­stance called mangiferin, which has an anti-vi­ral and anti-in­flam­ma­tory im­pact on the body. It also af­fects cer­tain enzymes in your body to pos­i­tively con­trol your blood su­gar lev­els! There’s also plenty of folk wis­dom that we could ben­e­fit from. Many lo­cals in Goa be­lieve that man­goes grow dur­ing the sum­mer be­cause of their cool­ing im­pact on the body. Man­goes are also very rich in vi­ta­min C, which is an im­mu­nity booster. The the­ory in Goa (and there may be some­thing to it!) is that the vi­ta­min C in man­goes helps us pre­pare for the mon­soon, which is a sea­son where more in­fec­tions than usual tend to hap­pen.

IN­DULGE WITH CARE!

But now for a word of cau­tion. There are peo­ple who eat five to six man­goes a day. If you’re one of them, take it easy. There’s a whole sea­son to en­joy man­goes and you should limit your in­take to one or two a day. If you’re highly di­a­betic, have half-amango in the morn­ing and maybe en­joy the other half in the evening. Cou­ple it with nuts and seeds if your su­gar level is too high. As for weight gain, man­goes will not by them­selves cause you to pile on the ki­los. They have neg­li­gi­ble fat in them and they pack a lot of nutri­tion, in­clud­ing vi­ta­min C, which helps de­tox the body. So trust in the good­ness of na­ture and en­joy the sea­son’s pro­duce in all its glory!

Man­goes are a rich source of vi­ta­mins C, A, E and K, and most of the B vi­ta­mins ex­cept vi­ta­min B12. Man­goes also have traces of Omega 3 and Omega 6 and are loaded with min­er­als and fi­bre.

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