HOW MILLENNIALS THINK...

21-YEAR-OLD CRICKETER MAYANK DAGAR AND 19-YEAR-OLD RACE CAR DRIVER JEHAN DARUVALA SHOW US HOW THE YOUNG LIKE TO DRESS. AND WE GET INTO THEIR MINDS TO SEE HOW THEY THINK!

Hindustan Times - Brunch - - Front Page - Text by Anil Sadarangani Pho­tos shot ex­clu­sively for HTBrunch by Subi Sa­muel Styling by Nazneen Har­i­anawala

CRICKETER MAYANK DAGAR (21) AND MO­TOR SPORTS RACER JEHAN DARUVALA (19) SHOW US WHAT A YOUNG MAN’S TASTE IN FASH­ION IS ALL ABOUT. PLUS! IN A JOCUND JOUST, THE BOYS FIELD QUES­TIONS THAT AT­TEMPT TO DECODE HOW MILLENNIALS THINK…

Do all millennials live their lives un­in­hib­it­edly on so­cial me­dia? Ev­i­dently, not all do. Our crick­et­ing su­per­star to­day may have over a 100K fol­low­ers on In­sta­gram, but our 19-year-old racer, Jehan… well, he prefers a more re­served ap­proach.

FIRST TIME FA­MOUS

Jehan ar­rives ahead of sched­ule and sits qui­etly in a chair look­ing at him­self in the mir­ror as make-up and hair artist Ash­win She­lar paints his youth­ful face. When he steps in front of pho­tog Subi Sa­muel’s lens, he is ner­vous. “I haven’t done such a photo shoot be­fore,” con­fesses Jehan, try­ing to keep a brave face (aren’t millennials to the cam­era born?).

Jehan’s so­cial me­dia posts from the race­track, how­ever, ap­pear to tell a dif­fer­ent story – of a boy who is any­thing but self-con­scious. As a kid, his fa­ther, Khur­shed, would take him to the go-kart­ing track at Mum­bai’s Powai area, where Jehan dis­cov­ered his love for speed. By age 13, he was win­ning go-kart­ing ti­tles in Asia and Europe and was be­ing billed as one of Sa­hara Force In­dia’s ris­ing mo­tor­sport driv­ers. Last year, he achieved several sig­nif­i­cant break­throughs. Jehan and is all set to study fi­nance at the Lon­don School of Eco­nomics later this year. When he be­came the first In­dian driver to win a race at the FIA For­mula 3 Euro­pean Cham­pi­onship, in a video from that win posted on his In­sta­gram, he is seen danc­ing atop his car, pump­ing his fists in the air, so giddy with his win, he does not even bother re­mov­ing his hel­met (for the world to see his happy face).

Back in the studio, face now vis­i­ble to the cam­era, Jehan awk­wardly kicks his legs in the air. Just when you think he’ll break un­der pres­sure, Mayank breezes in.

SE­CRET SU­PER­STAR

A stu­dent of English Hon­ours, the good-na­tured and hum­ble Mayank read­ily sheds his shirt. Jehan prefers to keep his on. Mayank shows off his tat­toos, play­fully pho­to­bombs Jehan, and, though he barely knows him, gives him tips on how to pose. Mayank is quick to re­mind his man­ager to In­sta­gram videos from the shoot to his 1,00,000-plus fol­low­ers. Jehan re­sists his man­ager’s at­tempts to make him more vis­i­ble on so­cial me­dia.

Mayank is happy to be com­pared to Bol­ly­wood cutie Varun Dhawan and one of his men­tors, Vi­rat Kohli. “I’d be hap­pier if peo­ple com­pare my game and fit­ness with Vi­rat bhaiya.” He be­came team In­dia’s sec­ond­high­est wicket-taker in the 2016 un­der-19 World Cup in Bangladesh. He went on to make a first-class de­but for Hi­machal Pradesh at the Ranji Tro­phy and was snapped up by Pre­ity Zinta to be the Kings XI Pun­jab squad’s lef­t­arm spin­ner.

“There’s noth­ing bad about be­ing good-look­ing, so I’m happy about this com­par­i­son,” he grins. Jehan quickly rubs off his make-up.

Ex­cerpts from the in­ter­view fol­low over­leaf.

Cricketer Mayank Dagar (left) and mo­tor sports racer Jehan Daruvala

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