LOVE BY CHANCE

Qarib Qarib Singlle ac­tors Ir­rfan and Par­vathy gave an in­sight into what mod­ern re­la­tion­ships look like to­day

Hindustan Times (Chandigarh) - City - - FRONT PAGE -

It was dur­ing the shoot­ing of the film that I started putting my­self out there again. PAR­VATHY, AC­TOR We get a cer­tain kind of con­di­tion­ing from the so­ci­ety, 90% of peo­ple take those norms se­ri­ously... They stop ex­plor­ing. IR­RFAN, AC­TOR

With his new found love for the ro­man­tic genre, Ir­rfan is on an ex­per­i­men­tal spree and his lat­est re­lease Qarib Qarib Sin­glee deals with on­line dat­ing. His co-star Par­vathy, a Malay­alam ac­tress, who makes her de­but with the film says that her char­ac­ter of Jaya was pretty close to what she is in real life. The lead ac­tors dis­cussed life, ro­mance, re­la­tion­ships and more when they vis­ited the Hin­dus­tan Times of­fice.

Ir­rfan, did you take up this role to change the im­age that peo­ple have of you?

Ir­rfan: No, it is just what you need at that time. If you have been do­ing cer­tain kind of films, you feel the need to do some­thing dif­fer­ent. Be­ing an ac­tor, the most im­por­tant thing is to share what is hap­pen­ing in­side you, around you and what con­cerns you. Love is a ma­jor thing in my life and it has changed me a lot; I un­der­stood life be­cause of that. You learn how it can flour­ish you and cleanse you. When you start un­der­stand­ing and ex­pe­ri­enc­ing that then you want to share it. You tend to learn about love through cinema when you are young and that af­fects you, but then it is not the same in real life.

Are you an ex­pres­sive per­son when it comes to love?

Ir­rfan: No I am not. I am ex­pres­sive when I re­alise that we have formed an equa­tion, not be­fore that.

Par­vathy, how close are you to your char­ac­ter in the film?

Par­vathy: I am pretty close to Jaya. There are a lot of tags and they don’t make sense to me. I was in a long dis­tance re­la­tion­ship, which had just ended, and the idea that you can fall in love again was pretty un­set­tling for me. You have to be re­ally brave enough to put your­self out there. I was tired be­cause I didn’t want to start from the scratch again, so I started stop­ping my­self from ex­press­ing. It was dur­ing the shoot­ing of the film that I started putting my­self out there again. It was very cathar­tic. The best thing about my job is that my char­ac­ters teach me so much. It hap­pened to me that while shoot­ing the film, I also started lik­ing some­one but I was so scared to con­fess. My friend said that the mo­ment you start wor­ry­ing about what will hap­pen, it is not healthy. So I started us­ing that funda and it is still go­ing strong. It does not mat­ter how long you love but how well you love.

Do you feel this movie will drop the tags and in­hi­bi­tions that we live with?

Ir­rfan: We get a cer­tain kind of con­di­tion­ing from the so­ci­ety, 90% of peo­ple take those norms se­ri­ously and they end up liv­ing the life that they would not have live ide­ally. They stop ex­plor­ing; they do what they are told. We have to un­der­stand we are live be­ings; ev­ery­thing that is told to us is dead un­less we ex­pe­ri­ence them our­selves. We make a gen­eral truth about so­ci­ety and try to push that truth on so­ci­ety. Ev­ery­body has to find their own truth.

PHO­TOS: AALOK SONI/ HT

Ir­rfan Khan and Par­vathy

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