IN­DIA, JA­PAN CON­DEMN TER­ROR EM­A­NAT­ING FROM PAK SOIL, NAME LASHKAR AND JAISH

JOINT STATE­MENT Talk about cross­bor­der ter­ror­ism for the first time in the doc­u­ment

Hindustan Times (Gurgaon) - - News - Jayanth Ja­cob let­ters@hin­dus­tan­times.com

In a first, the In­dia-Ja­pan joint state­ment sin­gled out Pak­istan­based ter­ror out­fits and pitched for “zero tol­er­ance” in com­bat­ing ter­ror­ism. In an oblique ref­er­ence to China and Pak­istan, for­eign sec­re­tary S Jais­hankar said “all par­ties who helped” North Korea to go nu­clear “should be held ac­count­able” while brief­ing the me­dia about the meet­ing be­tween Prime Min­is­ter Naren­dra Modi and his Ja­panese coun­ter­part Shinzo Abe. “They looked for­ward to… strength­en­ing co­op­er­a­tion against ter­ror­ist threats from groups, in­clud­ing Al-Qaida, ISIS, Jaish-e-Mo­ham­mad, Lak­shar-e-Taiba...” the state­ment said.

GANDHINAGAR: After the BRICS (Brazil, Rus­sia, In­dia, China and South Africa) group­ing de­plored Pak­istan-based ter­ror out­fits in their sum­mit dec­la­ra­tion last month, the In­dia-Ja­pan joint state­ment also sin­gled them out be­sides talk­ing about cross-bor­der ter­ror­ism for the first time in the doc­u­ment.

And in an oblique ref­er­ence to China and Pak­istan, for­eign sec­re­tary S Jais­hankar said that “all par­ties who helped” North Korea to go nu­clear “should be held ac­count­able” while brief­ing the me­dia about the meet­ing be­tween Prime Min­is­ter Naren­dra Modi and his Ja­panese coun­ter­part Shinzo Abe here on Thurs­day.

Jais­hankar said there was meet­ing of mind on the North Korean is­sue. A sub­stan­tial men­tion of ter­ror­ism in the joint state­ment could bol­ster New Delhi’s pos­ture that more and more coun­tries are blam­ing Pak­istan for al­low­ing its ter­ri­tory to plan and launch ter­ror at­tacks on In­dia, though Ja­pan is not a very ac­tive player in the re­gion in terms of se­cu­rity mat­ters.

But the men­tion of “cross bor­der move­ment of ter­ror­ists” (into In­dia) — with­out nam­ing Pak­istan — shows a change in Ja­pan’s po­si­tion of stay­ing some dis­tance away from the is­sue in any spe­cific man­ner.

“They (the two PMs) called upon all coun­tries to work to­wards root­ing out ter­ror­ist safe havens and in­fra­struc­ture, dis­rupt­ing ter­ror­ist net­works and fi­nanc­ing chan­nels, and halt­ing cross-bor­der move­ment of ter­ror­ists. They un­der­lined the need for all coun­tries to en­sure that their ter­ri­tory is not used to launch ter­ror­ist at­tacks on other coun­tries,” said the state­ment.

“They looked for­ward to….strength­en­ing co­op­er­a­tion against ter­ror­ist threats from groups, in­clud­ing Al-Qaida, ISIS, JeM, LeT, and their af­fil­i­ates,” it fur­ther said.

On Thurs­day, North Korea threat­ened to use nu­clear weapons to “sink” Ja­pan and re­duce the US to “ashes and dark­ness” for sup­port­ing a UN Se­cu­rity Coun­cil res­o­lu­tion after its lat­est test of a hy­dro­gen bomb. In­dia has shared Ja­pan’s con­cern over the is­sue in the joint state­ment; in turn, In­dia has made its po­si­tion clear that coun­tries sup­port­ing North Korea nu­clear pro­gramme should be held ac­count­able.

Jais­hankar said that the Ja­panese un­der­lined their con­cerns in strong terms.

AFP/PIB

PM Naren­dra Modi with Shinzo Abe at the Dandi Ku­tir mu­seum in Gandhinagar on Thurs­day.

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