SHUSH! IT’S SIM­PLE

Te­maki, ni­giri, ura­maki—have you ever felt in­tim­i­dated by these Ja­panese terms? Get fa­mil­iar with these sushis you’re likely to find on a menu

Hindustan Times (Patna) - Live - - Lifestyle - Pr­erna Gauba pr­erna.gauba@htlive.com

This is raw fish! Kaun khata hai yeh (who eats this)?” This is the re­sponse you got a few years back, when any­one men­tioned sushi. But that’s not the case any­more. Sushi seems to be the new pizza for Del­hi­ties. Peo­ple are not hes­i­tant to try sushi now. How­ever, with so many va­ri­eties avail­able, it can be a lit­tle tough to dif­fer­en­ti­ate be­tween them. This sushi chart makes it sim­ple for you to learn about var­i­ous types. Mas­ter chef Tetsu Akahira from Sakura, Met­ro­pol­i­tan Ho­tel and Spa helps us de­code the com­mon type of sushis that you will find on a menu. Next time when you go to that swanky Ja­panese eatery, or­der in style!

TE­MAKI For this sushi, the nori sheet is rolled into a cone, and stuffed with rice and va­ri­ety of other fill­ings such as shrimp, crab meat, shred­ded cu­cum­ber and av­o­cado, and fly­ing fish roe.

PHO­TOS:PR­ERNA GAUBA/HT

HO SO MAKI This is made from vine­gared rice and raw fish, seafood or veg­eta­bles, usu­ally (but not al­ways) wrapped in Nori, a pa­per-like, dried-an­droasted Ja­panese sea­weed.

NI­GIRI This sushi is made of vine­gared rice dabbed with wasabi paste. It is then topped with fil­lets of raw fish such as salmon, tuna and sea bass. You don’t need a bam­boo mat or a nori sheet to make this.

URA­MAKI This in­side-out sushi is made with vine­gared rice. The rice is rolled around a sea­weed or nori sheet. It is then laced with fly­ing fish roe or toasted sesame seeds to give the sushi mild crunch­i­ness.

SASHIMI Sashimi means sliced raw fish. Although this is a sim­ple dish to pre­pare since it needs no cook­ing, you need to take great care when se­lect­ing the fresh fish. Fil­lets of tuna, sea bass and salmon are placed on a tray. The sashimi is served with soy sauce and wasabi.

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