I was thrown out of films, called a liar: Raveena

RAVEENA TAN­DON AP­PEARS NEXT IN A FILM ABOUT VI­O­LENCE AGAINST WOMEN. SHE SAYS THAT IT’S THE PAR­ENTS’ JOB TO IN­STIL COM­PAS­SION IN CHIL­DREN.

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Ac­tor Raveena Tan­don (right) was one of hottest lead­ing ladies of Hindi cin­ema in the Nineties and Eight­ies. Once she moved to char­ac­ter roles, she did sub­stan­tial work there, too. But it wasn’t roses all the way.

Known for her out­spo­ken na­ture, Tan­don says that her hon­esty fre­quently landed her in trou­ble in the film in­dus­try. “I think, it’s chal­leng­ing to sur­vive in the en­ter­tain­ment in­dus­try if you are hon­est. I faced a lot of trou­ble — I have been thrown out of films, called a liar, treated badly.”

How­ever, “I stuck to be­ing hon­est and treated peo­ple with re­spect... some­thing learnt from my up­bring­ing,” the ac­tor adds.

Tan­don will be seen next in a film that deals with phys­i­cal vi­o­lence against women and em­pha­sises on sen­si­ble par­ent­ing. Asked whether prob­lems arise be­cause work­ing par­ents don’t spend time with their chil­dren, Raveena dis­agrees, say­ing, “Sta­tis­tics say that chil­dren who bully any weaker liv­ing crea­tures, like ston­ing a bird, at a very young age, end up as crim­i­nals be­cause they start tak­ing plea­sure in the pain of a weaker per­son or an­i­mal. It’s the par­ents’ re­spon­si­bil­ity to in­stil com­pas­sion in their chil­dren. You could be a home­maker or a work­ing par­ent, but if you don’t have a sharp ob­ser­va­tion of your child’s be­hav­iour, you can’t do that. I see no rea­son to blame work­ing moth­ers.”

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