Di­et­ing? It might not be a great idea

Hindustan Times (Patna) - Live - - Lifestyle -

Are you look­ing to shed those ex­tra ki­los through di­et­ing? Well, this news might not be too plat­able, if a re­cent re­search is any­thing to go by. The study in­di­cates that we may be at a loss when di­et­ing, as hu­man bod­ies tend to com­pen­sate by spar­ing en­ergy, lim­it­ing the num­ber of calo­ries that we burn — hence af­fect­ing our weight loss reg­i­men, re­searchers say.

Ac­cord­ing to a re­cent study, a group of neurons in the brain re­gion — hy­po­thal­a­mus — con­trib­utes to the caloric ther­mo­stat that reg­u­lates our weight, also reg­u­lat­ing how many calo­ries we burn. When ac­ti­vated, th­ese neurons make us hun­gry and drive us to eat, but when there is no food avail­able, they tend to com­pen­sate for the re­duc­tion in calo­ries.

“Our find­ings sug­gest that AGRP (the neurons: Agouti-re­lated neu­ropep­tide) in the brain co­or­di­nate ap­petite and en­ergy ex­pen­di­ture, and can turn a switch on and off to burn or spare calo­ries de­pend­ing on what’s avail­able in the en­vi­ron­ment,” said Cle­mence Blouet from the Univer­sity of Cam­bridge in Bri­tain. “When we eat less, our body com­pen­sates and burns fewer calo­ries, which makes los­ing weight harder,” Blouet added. How­ever, as soon as food be­comes avail­able and we start eat­ing, the ac­tion of the neurons is in­ter­rupted and our en­ergy ex­pen­di­ture goes back up again to nor­mal lev­els. So, if you are plan­ning to reg­u­late food by ditch­ing in­take, that might not be a great idea.

WHEN AC­TI­VATED, TH­ESE NEURONS MAKE US HUN­GRY. WHEN THERE IS NO FOOD AVAIL­ABLE, THEY TEND TO COM­PEN­SATE FOR THE RE­DUCED CALO­RIES

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