DARK SIDE OF THE SUN

Heat strokes can be fatal. Here’s how to avoid them

Hindustan Times ST (Mumbai) - Brunch - - WELLNESS - S HIKHA S HARMA

One of the most se­ri­ous ef­fects of sum­mer is heat strokes that of­ten turn fatal. Some peo­ple are more sus­cep­ti­ble than oth­ers to this, par­tic­u­larly the very old and the very young. So here are some ways to pre­vent heat strokes.

1. Keep chil­dren away from cars:

Do not leave chil­dren in cars parked in the sun or with the doors locked for even a few min­utes, be­cause the tem­per­a­ture in­side the car can shoot up to dan­ger­ous lev­els very quickly. And un­der no cir­cum­stances al­low chil­dren to play near cars. A game of hide and seek could quickly turn fatal.

2. Never leave a run­ning car in a garage: Car­bon monox­ide can kill.

3. Keep chil­dren out of the sun:

De­hy­dra­tion can lead to a heat stroke.

4. Wear only loose cot­tons in pas­tel shades:

Dark colours ab­sorb more sun and heat up the body. Avoid tight clothes in non-cot­ton fab­rics. And en­sure ev­ery­one you know fol­lows this rule.

5. Eat onions with ev­ery meal:

They are a nat­u­ral heat paci­fier. 6. Drink lots of wa­ter: Make sure to avoid tea, cof­fee and al­co­hol be­cause they dis­rupt the heat-con­trol­ling mech­a­nisms of the body.

7. Bathe fre­quently: Or at least use damp tow­els on your fore­head and feet.

8. Eat at reg­u­lar in­ter­vals:

An empty stomach de­creases the body’s ca­pac­ity to ad­just to heat.

9. Prac­tise yoga: Asanas and shee­tali pranayam will help in blood cir­cu­lati­tion.

10. Avoid bread, maida and fried foods: These are warm­ing foods.

HEAT STROKE SYMP­TOMS

Nau­sea, vom­it­ing, headaches, un­con­scious­ness, rapid heart beat and low BP.

HEAT STROKE FIRST AID

Loosen the cloth­ing, es­pe­cially col­lar and socks. Lay her/ him down in a cool, shaded place, pat the fore­head and feet with a damp cloth. Mois­ten her/his lips, spray the face and neck with wa­ter. Take the per­son to a nearby hospi­tal.

AN ONION A DAY! In­clude onions in your diet as they are nat­u­ral heat

paci­fiers

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