Do pluck some luck

Dif­fer­ent fruits can be used in feng shui to at­tract many kinds of pos­i­tive en­er­gies that en­hance var­i­ous aspects of one’s life

HT Estates - - Property Classifieds - Lipika Sud

The feng shui en­ergy of fruits is the en­ergy of fruition. The use of spe­cific fruits in tra­di­tional feng shui ap­pli­ca­tions is of­ten dic­tated by clas­si­fi­ca­tions from an­cient texts as be­ing spe­cific sym­bols of longevity, wealth, pros­per­ity, fer­til­ity, etc.

When choos­ing im­ages of fruits as a feng shui cure, first and fore­most be guided by your own in­stincts, or your own un­der­stand­ing of the en­ergy of the fruit, as well as its pos­si­ble medic­i­nal reme­dies.

Feng shui-wise, at­ten­tion is of­ten paid to the colours, numbers, as well as the sym­bol­ism of spe­cific fruits.

Be­low is the de­scrip­tion of the most pop­u­lar fruit sym­bols as used in feng shui ap­pli­ca­tions:

Peach: One of the most pop­u­lar feng shui fruit sym­bols, peach is the sym­bol of im­mor­tal­ity. The peach is also known in feng shui as the fruit of heaven be­cause of its promi­nence in many an­cient Chi­nese leg­ends about the Im­mor­tal gods. Peach came to be as­so­ci­ated with wealth, health, abun­dance and longevity. The peach is also known as a feng shui sym­bol of love and mar­riage. In China, “love luck” is of­ten re­ferred to as “peach blos­soms luck”.

Pomegranate: Be­cause the pomegranate is full of juicy seeds, it sym­bol­ises fer­til­ity and is used as a feng shui fer­til­ity cure. Pomegranate also sym­bol­ises hap­pi­ness in the fam­ily, as well as good luck for one’s descen­dants. Feng shui con­sul­tants of­ten ad­vise new­ly­wed cou­ples to dis­play art with pomegranates to at­tract good luck and many healthy chil­dren.

Grapes: In feng shui, grapes sym­bol­ise abun­dance of food, thus abun­dance of ma­te­rial wealth. Grapes came to rep­re­sent suc­cess and abun­dance in the near fu­ture. Thus, it is com­mon to see dis­plays of grapes in homes. Some­times grapes are also used as a feng shui sym­bol, or cure for fer­til­ity, as well as for turn­ing bad luck into good luck.

Ap­ple: Ap­ple has al­ways been as­so­ci­ated with peace, good health and har­mony in one’s home. Colour-wise, red ap­ples are con­sid­ered to be very aus­pi­cious, although or course green and golden/yel­low ap­ples are also widely used ac­cord­ing to their colour prop­er­ties.

Pineap­ple: The sound of the Chi­nese word for pineap­ple is close to the sound of “good luck com­ing your way”, so the pineap­ple has be­come a pop­u­lar tra­di­tional feng shui sym­bol of wealth, for­tune and pros­per­ity.

Oranges: The pop­u­lar­ity of oranges in the tra­di­tional feng shui ap­pli­ca­tions is ex­plained by the re­fresh­ing/cleans­ing odour, as well as the yang qual­ity of the orange colour. As a feng shui cure it is of­ten rec­om­mended that one place nine oranges in one’s liv­ing room or kitchen for good luck and pros­per­ity. It is be­lieved that cit­rus fruits can ward off bad luck, thus oranges, along with tan­ger­ines and limes are of­ten used in tra­di­tional feng shui ap­pli­ca­tions.

Lichee: The lichee is a de­li­ciously juicy fruit with bright red skin, it sig­ni­fies a mar­riage union that is blessed with clever descen­dants. Young mar­ried women are en­cour­aged to eat the lichee fruit to cre­ate this kind of luck for them­selves. Paint­ings of aus­pi­cious fruits should al­ways in­clude the lichee.

Make lib­eral use of all these good for­tune fruits to en­er­gise the Chi of good descen­dants’ luck. You will soon dis­cover the po­tency of the Feng Shui of good for­tune fruit for fer­til­ity. The most en­joy­able part is, of course, eat­ing your tasty feng shui sym­bols.

It is best to use/dis­play fresh fruits for their spe­cific en­er­gies. How­ever, tra­di­tional feng shui schools have de­vel­oped a va­ri­ety of prod­ucts that in­cor­po­rate the sym­bol­ism of fruits - from fruit shaped crys­tals to var­i­ous amulets with the rep­re­sen­ta­tion of spe­cific fruits.

THINKSTOCK

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