GLOBAL FOOD & DRINKS TRENDS OF 2018

Min­tel has iden­ti­fied five key trends that re­flect over­ar­ch­ing 2018 con­sumer themes in­clud­ing trust, self-care, stress, in­di­vid­u­al­ity, and sus­tain­abil­ity. Each of the trends has been cho­sen be­cause it will have an im­pact on con­sumers, man­u­fac­tur­ers, and r

Images Retail - - CONTENTS - – By IM­AGES Re­tail Bu­reau

Min­tel iden­ti­fies five key trends that re­flect 2018 con­sumer themes

Min­tel’s 2018 Global Food & Drink Trends are the re­sult of col­lab­o­ra­tion be­tween 60 of Min­tel’s ex­pert an­a­lysts in more than a dozen coun­tries around the world. These global con­ver­sa­tions have led to the iden­ti­fi­ca­tion of five key trends that re­flect over arch­ing 2018 con­sumer themes in­clud­ing trust, self­care, stress, in­di­vid­u­al­ity, and sus­tain­abil­ity. Each of the trends has been cho­sen be­cause it will have an im­pact on con­sumers, man­u­fac­tur­ers, and re­tail­ers across Europe, the Mid­dle East, Africa, Asia Pa­cific, and the Amer­i­cas in 2018.

The con­cepts are cur­rent but also in­cor­po­rate el­e­ments that are evo­lu­tions of Min­tel’s 2016 and 2017 Global Food & Drink Trend pre­dic­tions, which con­tinue to be sig­nif­i­cant influences in many cat­e­gories and coun­tries. To show­case the rel­e­vance of the five fu­turelook­ing trends, our an­a­lyst in­sights have been sup­ported by ev­i­dence gath­ered from Min­tel’s pro­pri­etary con­sumer re­search, in­no­va­tive de­vel­op­ments ob­served by Min­tel’s ex­pert team of trend spot­ters, and in­ter­na­tional food and drink prod­ucts col­lected in Min­tel Global New Prod­ucts Data­base.

Full Dis­clo­sure

Many con­sumers around the world lack trust in reg­u­la­tory sys­tems, man­u­fac­tur­ers, and even their fel­low hu­mans. This com­pounds a pre­ex­ist­ing wari­ness about food and drink be­cause of prod­uct re­calls, scan­dals, and sus­pi­cion about large com­pa­nies. The con­ver­gence of skep­ti­cism ex­tends and en­hances the ex­ist­ing con­sumer in­ter­est in the ori­gins of food and drink that has been present (in some mar­kets) for the past decade.

As shown by the growth in nat­u­ral, eth­i­cal, and en­vi­ron­men­tal claims, wide­spread dis­trust has in­creased the need for food and drink man­u­fac­tur­ers to be forth­com­ing about their in­gre­di­ents, pro­duc­tion pro­cesses, and sup­ply chains. This places pres­sure on man­u­fac­tur­ers to of­fer thor­ough and hon­est dis­clo­sures about how, where, when, and by whom food and drink is grown, har­vested, made, and/or sold. Food and drink trans­parency can take many dif­fer­ent direc­tions, but the var­i­ous claims

serve a sin­gu­lar pur­pose: to help con­sumers feel more con­fi­dent about the safety and pu­rity of the food and drink that they pur­chase.

One great ex­am­ple of this is Nescafé Arte­sano San­tu­ario Ris­ralda. The Arte­sano line was launched by Nescafé in Colom­bia in 2017 and is sup­ported by Nescafé Plan, which aims to im­prove the liveli­hoods of farm­ers and their com­mu­ni­ties and as­sist with the sus­tain­able man­age­ment of land­scapes. (Source: www.face­book.com/ NESCAFE.CO)

Self-ful­fill­ing Prac­tices

As more con­sumers find modern life to be hec­tic and stress­ful, flex­i­ble and balanced di­ets will be­come in­te­gral el­e­ments of self­care rou­tines.

In 2018, in­di­vid­ual def­i­ni­tions of self-care and bal­ance will re­in­force the need for a va­ri­ety of food and drink prod­ucts that present con­sumers with pos­i­tive so­lu­tions that can be in­cor­po­rated into their cus­tomised and flex­i­ble def­i­ni­tions of health and well­ness. This cre­ates open­ings in the mar­ket for a va­ri­ety of for­mats, for­mu­la­tions, and por­tion sizes of food and drink that pro­vide con­sumers with op­tions that can fit their in­di­vid­ual diet plan and their cur­rent—or as­pi­ra­tional—mood.

In­deed, self-care-fo­cussed con­sumers will be look­ing for in­gre­di­ents, prod­ucts, and com­bi­na­tions that ad­dress nu­tri­tional, phys­i­cal, or emo­tional ben­e­fits.

Con­sumers who are seek­ing more rou­tine re­lief from stress will con­tinue to change the def­i­ni­tion of “per­mis­si­ble in­dul­gence” from the rare over-the-top feast to more ha­bit­ual bet­ter-for-you and flavour­ful treats that are in­dis­pens­able el­e­ments of phys­i­cally and emo­tion­ally balanced life­styles.

For ex­am­ple,häa­gen-dazs Minis va­ri­ety pack from Sin­ga­pore con­tains three Green Tea & Al­mond and two Mango & Rasp­berry 40ml ice cream bars for por­tion­con­trolled treats.

New Sen­sa­tions

In 2018, the sound, feel, and sat­is­fac­tion that tex­ture pro­vides will be­come more im­por­tant to com­pa­nies and con­sumers alike. Tex­ture is the next facet of for­mu­la­tion that can be lever­aged to pro­vide con­sumers with in­ter­ac­tive – and doc­u­men­ta­tion-wor­thy – ex­pe­ri­ences.

From chewy bev­er­ages to com­plex for­mu­la­tions such as creamy ice cream with crispy chunks, tex­ture can make prod­ucts more cap­ti­vat­ing for con­sumers who con­tinue to seek food and drink that is per­ceived as fresh, func­tional, fill­ing, or sim­ply fun. To align with this trend, brands can em­pha­sise the qual­i­ties of ex­ist­ing prod­ucts as ev­i­denced by a South Korean ad for Ritz Crack­ers that show­cased the noises made when open­ing and eat­ing the crispy cracker. Tex­ture also can be a key el­e­ment for in­tro­duc­tions such as the May 2017 lim­ited-edi­tion Fire­work Oreo in the US that con­tained pop­ping candy in­side the cream of the iconic sand­wich cookie.

In par­tic­u­lar, food and drink de­signed with ad­di­tional tex­tures has the po­ten­tial to en­gage younger i-gen­er­a­tion con­sumers who are hun­gry for ex­pe­ri­ences. These teens and young adults (rang­ing in age from 10 to

27 in 2018, de­pend­ing on the re­gion), have grown up with tech­nol­ogy, which has made in­ter­ac­tiv­ity and doc­u­men­ta­tion in­dis­pens­able parts of ev­ery­day life. Teens were the tar­get for the Aus­tralian launch of Co­ca­cola’s car­bon­ated soft drinks

IN DEF­I­NI­TIONS 2018, IN­DI­VID­UAL OF SELF-CARE AND BAL­ANCE WILL RE­IN­FORCE THE NEED FOR A VA­RI­ETY OF FOOD AND DRINK PROD­UCTS THAT PRESENT CON­SUMERS WITH POS­I­TIVE SO­LU­TIONS THAT CAN BE IN­COR­PO­RATED INTO THEIR CUS­TOMISED AND FLEX­I­BLE DEF­I­NI­TIONS OF HEALTH AND WELL­NESS.

THE EVO­LU­TIONS LAT­EST IN SHOP­PING OF­FER CON­SUMERS PROMPT AND AF­FORD­ABLE DE­LIV­ERY, A CU­RATED AD­VEN­TURE COUR­TESY OF SUB­SCRIP­TION SER­VICES, EASE OF AU­TO­MATIC RE­PLEN­ISH­MENT, AND SIM­PLIC­ITY OF SYN­CHRO­NI­SA­TION WITH SMART HOME DE­VICES.

Fanta Jelly that in­structed con­sumers to “shake the can; wake the wob­ble” and Fanta Sour Tin­gle, which prom­ises to awaken taste buds with its tangy flavour. The quest for ex­pe­ri­ences pro­vides op­por­tu­ni­ties for multi sen­sory food and drink that uses un­ex­pected tex­ture to pro­vide the i-gen­er­a­tion, as well as con­sumers of all ages—with tan­gi­ble con­nec­tions to the real world as well as mo­ments worth shar­ing ei­ther in­per­son or on­line.

Pref­er­en­tial Treat­ment

A new era in per­son­al­i­sa­tion is dawn­ing due to the ex­pan­sion of on­line and mo­bile food shop­ping. Mo­ti­vated by the po­ten­tial to save time and ide­ally money, con­sumers are sam­pling a va­ri­ety of chan­nels and tech­nolo­gies when shop­ping for food and drink. The lat­est evo­lu­tions in shop­ping of­fer con­sumers prompt and af­ford­able de­liv­ery, a cu­rated ad­ven­ture cour­tesy of sub­scrip­tion ser­vices, ease of au­to­matic re­plen­ish­ment, and sim­plic­ity of syn­chro­ni­sa­tion with smart home de­vices. Busy con­sumers are drawn to e-com­merce sites, mo­bile apps, voice con­trol, and other on­line and mo­bile op­tions be­cause they are ad­van­ta­geous to their busy sched­ules and po­ten­tially their bud­gets.

Be­yond con­ve­nience, tech­nol­ogy will of­fer new pos­si­bil­i­ties for per­son­alised rec­om­men­da­tions of prod­ucts and in­di­vid­u­ally tar­geted pro­mo­tions. For ex­am­ple, The Coca-cola Com­pany has de­vel­oped a smart vend­ing ma­chine that en­ables per­son­alised of­fers and mo­bile pur­chases.

Chi­nese e-com­merce com­pany Alibaba in­tro­duced phys­i­cal Hema mar­kets where shop­pers must use a mo­bile app that pro­vides ef­fi­cient and per­son­alised shop­ping ex­pe­ri­ences. Mean­while, e-com­merce gi­ant Ama­zon’s ac­qui­si­tion of Whole Foods Mar­ket and a part­ner­ship be­tween Wal­mart and Google will likely pro­vide con­sumers with tar­geted pro­mo­tions, sug­ges­tions, and in­no­va­tions that cap­i­talise on on­line, as well as off­line, shop­ping be­hav­iours.

Sci­ence Fare

A tech­no­log­i­cal rev­o­lu­tion is play­ing out in man­u­fac­tur­ing as some for­ward-look­ing com­pa­nies are de­vel­op­ing so­lu­tions to re­place farms and fac­to­ries with sci­en­tif­i­cally en­gi­neered in­gre­di­ents and fin­ished prod­ucts.

En­ter­pris­ing com­pa­nies are build­ing on ad­vance­ments in tech­nol­ogy, in­clud­ing stem cell cul­tures and 3D print­ing, to repli­cate na­ture in con­trolled en­vi­ron­ments. De­vel­op­ments that en­gi­neer food and drink sta­ples such as lab­o­ra­tory-grown meat and an­i­mal-free dairy have grabbed head­lines in the last five years, but the re­sult­ing prod­ucts are of­ten ex­pen­sive, and some are still years away from wide­spread com­mer­cial avail­abil­ity.

How­ever, in­vest­ments, such as those made by Gen­eral Mills, Tyson, Cargill, Unilever, and tech bil­lion­aire Bill Gates, have has­tened the pace of de­vel­op­ment and avail­abil­ity of sci­en­tif­i­cally en­gi­neered food and drink.

US com­pany Be­yond Meat notes that when con­sumers pur­chase its pre­pared meals, which are pro­duced in part­ner­ship with Gen­eral

Mills, “the con­sumer is lend­ing Mother Na­ture a help­ing hand and pos­i­tively im­pact­ing cli­mate change by con­serv­ing wa­ter, en­ergy and land”.

Fel­low plant-based meat com­pany Im­pos­si­ble Foods gets more spe­cific, defin­ing that its plant-based burger uses 95 per­cent less land, 74 per­cent less wa­ter, and cre­ates 87 per­cent less green­house gas emis­sions than the cur­rent meat sup­ply chain.

Sci­en­tif­i­cally en­gi­neered food and drink will ini­tially at­tract con­sumers who are wor­ried about the en­vi­ron­ment and are tak­ing steps to be more eco­con­scious. In time, the tar­get au­di­ence for sci­en­tif­i­cally en­gi­neered in­gre­di­ents could go be­yond en­vi­ron­men­tally con­scious con­sumers and ap­peal to con­sumers who are con­cerned about in­gre­di­ent con­sis­tency, ef­fi­cacy, and pu­rity. Tech­nol­ogy will be­gin to dis­rupt the tra­di­tional food chain in 2018 as en­ter­pris­ing man­u­fac­tur­ers aim to re­place farms and fac­to­ries with lab­o­ra­to­ries.

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