WRAPPED IN SILK

PARIS FASH­ION LA­BEL HER­MÈS RE­LIVES ITS IN­DIA IN­SPI­RA­TION IN A NEW LINE OF SA­REES WO­VEN FROM ITS LE­GENDARY SCARVES, VA­ROON P. ANAND DIS­COV­ERS

India Today - - FASHION -

The scarf, or carré, holds a very spe­cial po­si­tion in the Her­mès pan­theon. The first scarf from Her­mès de­buted in 1937, ex­actly 100 years af­ter the cre­ation of the brand. Her­mès cel­e­brated this achieve­ment by open­ing a ded­i­cated scarf fac­tory in Lyon, France. Over the years the Her­mès scarf has played an iconic role in fash­ion his­tory, adorn­ing the re­gal manes of Grace Kelly, Queen El­iz­a­beth II and other il­lus­tri­ous women down the ages.

It was Robert Du­mas-her­mès who, in the early 1950’s, wanted to ex­ploit the de­sign po­ten­tial of the carré. Her­mès has long drawn in­spi­ra­tion from In­dia’s op­u­lent shores and this au­tumn the Parisian house will cel­e­brate the open­ing of its new bou­tique in Mum­bai with the launch of a unique col­lec­tion of sa­rees in­ter­preted by Her­mès. The exclusive and lim­ited set of pieces, avail­able at the Horn­i­man Cir­cle Square bou­tique from Oc­to­ber 7th 2011, re­flects Her­mès’ fine crafts­man­ship and eter­nal quest for ex­cel­lence. The col­lec­tion is the re­al­i­sa­tion of Her­mès’ de­sire of trans­lat­ing the colour­ful sa­ree into a so­phis­ti­cated and telling style state­ment. Fash­ioned from the most beau­ti­ful ma­te­ri­als for sum­mer and win­ter, the sa­rees’ prints draw in­spi­ra­tion from mythic and con­tem­po­rary Her­mès scarves: New Springs in mous­se­line; Fleurs In­di­ennes in dou­ble mous­se­line, Coupons In­di­ens in cash­mere and silk and Patch in silk twill. Colours have played a cen­tral part in these Her­mès cre­ations and have been

se­lected re­spect­ing the house’s spirit and the tra­di­tions in In­dia. Af­ter choos­ing one of these sa­ree, you can or­der a made-to-mea­sure choli at the Her­mès store. The en­sem­ble is pre­sented in a spe­cially crafted box.

This col­lec­tion has been de­vel­oped in the Her­mès’ work­shops in Lyon by their artis­tic di­rec­tor Pierre-alexis Du­mas, grand­son of Robert Du­mas-her­mès. In the year that Her­mès pays homage to its con­tem­po­rary ar­ti­sans, a new way of print­ing has been de­vised to cre­ate a length of printed fab­ric mea­sur­ing 5.50m and each piece is char­ac­terised by the Her­mès ‘roulotté’ edge that re­quires ap­prox­i­mately 9 metic­u­lous hours work for the dou­ble mous­se­line sari.

Her­mès has al­ways strived to seek out the finest qual­ity for its prod­ucts. Since its es­tab­lish­ment in 1837, six gen­er­a­tions of en­ter­pris­ing and pas­sion­ate ar­ti­sans have con­trib­uted to spread­ing its val­ues, which cen­tre around a savoir-faire built upon the del­i­cate and skilled craft of the finest ma­te­ri­als, upon the love for beau­ti­ful ob­jects cre­ated to last over time and upon the spirit of per­pet­ual in­no­va­tion. The com­pany is headed by CEO Pa­trick Thomas and by Pier­reAlexis Du­mas, a mem­ber of the 6th gen­er­a­tion of the Her­mès fam­ily.

So­phis­ti­cated and yet eas­ily en­velop­ing the body (be­low); A Her­mès orig­i­nal scarf in­spired by In­dia’s Mar­wari horse breed (right)

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