SON­NETS IN STONE

DE­SIGNER NI­RAV MODI GOES BE­YOND TRENDS TO DE­FINE TIME­LESS, WHEN IT COMES TO JEW­ELLERY

India Today - - LEISURE -

When it comes to jew­ellery, I am un­com­fort­able with use of the term trend since it im­plies a col­lec­tive and fleet­ing ob­ses­sion with a form or stone. As a jew­eller I strive to cre­ate pieces that have dis­tinc­tive­ness and time­less­ness at their core. Di­a­monds in par­tic­u­lar, with their rar­ity and in­de­struc­tibil­ity, prof­fer a unique lure in this re­gard.

Im­por­tant trends, then, at least for me, are con­cepts that al­ter the sta­tus quo; styles that are up­com­ing yet more sig­nif­i­cantly per­va­sive enough to sur­vive the con­ti­nu­ity of gen­er­a­tions or the whims of buy­ers. Here are three trends or waves that I be­lieve are note­wor­thy and have per­co­lated into my col­lec­tions as well.

MIN­I­MAL METAL

Van Cleef & Ar­pels were pi­o­neers in jew­ellery crafts­man­ship and de­sign. In fact, as far back as 1933 they patented the now fa­mous Serti mys­terieux or ‘ mys­tery set­ting’ which al­lows stones to be set in a mo­saic bed undis­turbed by metal prongs. And this march to­wards a min­i­mal metal look has not at­ten­u­ated even in the 21st cen­tury. As more jewellers de­velop tech­ni­cal prow­ess and con­sumers crave a sleek look, we see an im­pres­sive re­fine­ment in jew­ellery, es­pe­cially in the con­text of di­a­mond cuts and jew­ellery set­ting. I have re­cently de­vel­oped what is known as the end­less cut with an enigma set­ting as well as the ainra cuts, both of which have been well re­ceived. The end­less cut cre­ates a seam­less halo of di­a­monds sym­bol­is­ing in­fin­ity. When end­less cut di­a­monds are set, no metal can be seen hold­ing the di­a­monds in place. There­fore, this cre­ates a seam­less halo of di­a­monds sym­bol­is­ing in­fin­ity. All di­a­monds in such cases are cut from a sin­gle

rough di­a­mond and are cal­i­brated to en­sure a pre­cise cur­va­ture.

As far as the ainra cut is con­cerned, the di­a­mond links are crafted from two crescent- shaped di­a­monds which then re­place the metal chains that are tra­di­tion­ally used in jew­ellery. We use them to con­nect the main stones at the very top and bot­tom of dan­gling ear­rings, and in neck­laces, to sus­pend the pen­dent and to craft a lat­tice around fancy coloured di­a­monds in bracelets. Un­like metal, which is opaque, the lus­tre of di­a­monds cre­ates a link­age of pure light, cre­at­ing the im­pres­sion that the di­a­monds are sim­ply float­ing.

FLU­ID­ITY

As metaphors go, the fem­i­nine form, in my opin­ion, is the clos­est sim­u­la­tion to flu­id­ity es­pe­cially when it is draped in a tra­di­tional In­dian swathe of fab­ric in the form of an anarkali or sari. I am thrilled to see jewellers fi­nally em­brac­ing flu­id­ity, both in terms of de­sign and crafts­man­ship. Chanel’s new Col­lec­tion Ruban, or rib­bon col­lec­tion uses knots and bows rem­i­nis­cent of rib­bons to cre­ate an aura of fem­i­nin­ity and flu­id­ity.

The scarf and sari neck­laces, which are my new­est pieces, are de­signed to evoke the twists and turns of fab­ric and are ex­tremely ag­ile. As a re­sult, each el­e­ment can be moved and the neck­lackes con­form to the rhythm of any move­ment. So much so that a guest at the Ni­rav Modi sa­lon was re­cently shocked to see that the scarf neck­lace com­pletely col­lapsed to fit into her palm.

MULTI- PUR­POSE JEW­ELLERY

It is per­haps a truism to say that we live in an age of choice and power at your fin­ger­tips. Con­sumers don’t just look for some­thing new but what’s never- be­for­e­seen and the de­sire is to iden­tify posses- PATENTED NM END­LESS CUT: THE BAND SYM­BOL­ISES IN­FIN­ITY WITH CAL­I­BRATED DI­A­MONDS OF EQUAL CUR­VA­TURE CRE­AT­ING A HALO IN 18- CARAT WHITE GOLD

AINRA TM EMER­ALD EAR­RING: TWO EMER­ALD SHAPED DI­A­MONDS JOINED TO­GETHER BY THE UNIQUE NI­RAV MODI PATENTED AINRATM DI­A­MOND LINKS ( RIGHT)

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.