THINGS YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT DI­A­BETES MANASI AND GEETANJALI KIR­LOSKAR

India Today - - SOUTHERN SUNRISE -

Di­a­betes is an an­cient dis­ease. The ear­li­est known writ­ten record can be traced back to 1500 BC— in the Atharva Veda as well as in Egyp­tian Ebers Papyrus. Both re­fer to the sig­na­ture symp­tom: fre­quent uri­na­tion Di­a­betes is fast be­com­ing the big­gest global epi­demic, af­fect­ing about 415 mn peo­ple. While hered­i­tary fac­tors play a role, rapid changes in life­style and diet (from nu­tri­tious home­made foods to junk foods) are the trig­gers, lead­ing to obe­sity and Type 2 Di­a­betes One-third of all pa­tients don’t know they have the dis­ease, as Type 2 di­a­betes of­ten doesn’t have any symp­toms (only about 5 per cent of all peo­ple with di­a­betes have Type 1) Type 2 di­a­betes ac­counts for around 90 per cent of all di­a­betes world­wide. Type 1 di­a­betes is char­ac­terised by lack of in­sulin pro­duc­tion, while Type 2 re­sults from the body’s in­ef­fec­tive use of in­sulin

SHRIYA SARAN WITH RAJ CHEN­GAPPA

Forty per cent In­di­ans around the age of 55 have di­a­betes, while 35 per cent have pre­di­a­betes

TA­MAN­NAAH WITH KALLI PURIE VIKRAM KIR­LOSKAR, AROON PURIE, RA­JEEV GOWDA AND ASADUDDIN OWAISI

The third type is ges­ta­tional di­a­betes, char­ac­terised by hy­per­gly­caemia, or raised blood sugar, first recog­nised dur­ing preg­nancy

VISHNU MANCHU WITH A GUEST

Deaths from di­a­betes are pro­jected to rise by over 50 per cent in the next 10 years. And 80 per cent oc­cur in lowand mid­dle-in­come coun­tries. Di­a­betes deaths are slated to dou­ble be­tween 2016 and 2030 2

AMYRA DAApSaTrUt

9 To­day, the treat­ing physi­cian has a wide va­ri­ety of drugs to choose from. In­sulin in­jec­tions have be­come bet­ter and with less side-ef­fects.

fRrom these, mon­i­tor­ing of di­a­betes is also much more easy Peo­ple with di­a­betes are twice as likely to de­velop heart dis­ease than those with­out di­a­betes. Di­a­betes is the lead­ing cause of blind­ness in work­ing-age adults

CLOCK­WISE FROM LEFT: DIA BHUPAL, SETHU VAIDYANATHAN, SERAH JOHN, UPASANA KAMINENI AND MANASI KIR­LOSKAR

8 3 7 4 Some 69.1 mn suf­fer from di­a­betes in In­dia, pro­jected to go up to 87 mn by 2030. In­dia is con­sid­ered the di­a­betes hub of the world. Two per cent In­dian adults in cities and 1 per cent in vil­lages had di­a­betes in the 1970s. To­day, in big cities like Chen­nai and Delhi, the preva­lence rate is al­most 25 per cent

SUHASINI MANI RAT­NAM AND KHUSHBOO SUN­DAR

6 5

THE NORTH-SOUTH DI­VIDE HAD BEEN BRIDGED, AND IT WAS TIME TO TAKE THE CON­VER­SA­TION TO THE NEXT LEVEL. THERE WERE PRO­POS­ALS APLENTY TO LIVEN UP PRO­CEED­INGS. SOME IN JEST, TOO.

Graphic byJATNAUNARMYO30Y,

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