BLOOD BROTH­ERS?

WHERE THE EURASIAN STEPPE GENES ARE CON­CEN­TRATED TO­DAY

India Today - - COVER STORY -

1

Aryan In­va­sion The­ory (AIT), a 19th cen­tury con­struct orig­i­nally used to ex­plain lin­guis­tic affini­ties be­tween Euro­pean and

In­dian lan­guages, is adopted to ex­plain the down­fall of the In­dus Val­ley civil­i­sa­tion, the first sites of which were dis­cov­ered in the 1920s

2

AIT op­posed by an in­dig­in­ist/ na­tion­al­ist ar­gu­ment sug­gest­ing that In­dus Val­ley sites were part of a Vedic

con­tin­uum and that lin­guis­tic con­nec­tions be­tween In­dia and West Asia or Europe can be ex­plained by an Out of In­dia The­ory (OIT)

3

OIT bol­stered by stud­ies in the early 2000s find­ing ev­i­dence in the mi­to­chon­drial

DNA (trac­ing ma­ter­nal de­scent) of In­dian pop­u­la­tions sug­gest­ing an­cient roots in the sub­con­ti­nent

4

A 2013 study uses whole genome data of more than 500 in­di­vid­u­als from 73 In­dian com­mu­ni­ties and finds ev­i­dence of dis­tinct An­ces­tral North In­dian (ANI) and South In­dian (ASI) pop­u­la­tions that have only mixed be­tween 2,000 and 4,000 years ago

5

Stud­ies of Y chro­mo­some ge­netic data (trac­ing pa­ter­nal lineage) strongly sug­gest that the R1a1a (‘Aryan marker’) hap­logroup, com­mon in North In­dia, orig­i­nated in pop­u­la­tions near the Caspian Sea and in Iran. Mount­ing ev­i­dence for a (pri­mar­ily male) ‘Aryan mi­gra­tion’ into In­dia

6

Re­sults for DNA sam­ples from 4,300-4,500-yearold graves in Rakhi­garhi, Haryana, are ex­pected to be an­nounced in Septem­ber. This may still not set­tle the de­bate since the DNA sam­ples are from the same pe­riod in which mi­gra­tion into In­dia is now sug­gested to have oc­curred

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