Dell re­boots to ‘startup’ mode

An­nounces new tech in­no­va­tions and four cus­tomer im­per­a­tives to surge ahead into the en­ter­prise IT so­lu­tions mar­ket

InformationWeek - - Contents - BY BRIAN PEREIRA tweet @bri­an9p

An­nounces new tech in­no­va­tions and four cus­tomer im­per­a­tives to surge ahead into the en­ter­prise IT so­lu­tions mar­ket

“It feels like I am a part of the world’s largest startup com­pany. As a pri­vate com­pany, we have the free­dom to make the bold moves that are nec­es­sary” Michael Dell Founder & CEO, Dell

What would Dell as a com­pany be like af­ter go­ing pri­vate? How much would change? What would be its go-to-mar­ket strat­egy for 2014? How would Dell ab­sorb and in­te­grate all the com­pa­nies and tech­nolo­gies it had ac­quired, into its prod­uct mix? What are the hot profit seg­ments that Dell will pur­sue in 2014 and be­yond? Will it con­tinue to make and sell PCs in a shrink­ing mar­ket? These were ques­tions on ev­ery­one’s mind at the Dell World 2013 (De­cem­ber 11- 13) in Austin Texas.

Lis­ten­ing to the highly charged key­note speeches, meet­ing with Dell lead­er­ship and tech­nol­o­gists, lis­ten­ing to cus­tomer pan­els, and walk­ing around the glitzy so­lu­tions expo floor, it be­came ob­vi­ous that, as a pri­vate com­pany, Dell is rar­ing to go — and wants to put the fun el­e­ment back in work. It has a longer-term strat­egy, new tech­nol­ogy in­no­va­tions like Dell Pow­erEdge VRTX, Fluid Cache for SAN, 12th gen­er­a­tion Pow­erEdge servers, and Dell En­ter­prise Mo­bil­ity Man­age­ment (more on these later), ag­gres­sive pric­ing, and more de­light for cus­tomers and chan­nel part­ners. It’s more com­mit­ted to en­trepreneur­ship and in­no­va­tion, and open to in­dus­try part­ner­ships.

At Dell World on De­cem­ber 12, a vis­i­bly re­lieved and ec­static Michael Dell (Founder & CEO) said, “It feels like I am a part of the world’s largest startup com­pany. As a pri­vate com­pany, we have the free­dom to make the bold moves that are nec­es­sary, in­vest­ing in emerg­ing mar­kets, in PCs, tablets, soft­ware, so­lu­tions, and in data cen­ters.”

You can watch the key­note video on de­mand at: http://dell­world.com/

liveon­line.

Dell World is an an­nual event that’s at­tended by Dell cus­tomers, ecosys­tem part­ners, me­dia pro­fes­sion­als, tech­nol­o­gists and an­a­lysts, who get to see and ex­pe­ri­ence Dell’s so­lu­tions, and hear about its plans for the com­ing year. Last year, Dell World had a foot­fall of 3,000 people; a sim­i­lar num­ber was ex­pected this year. Dell World 2013 was held at the sprawl­ing, multi-level Austin Con­ven­tion Cen­ter, span­ning over 881,400 square feet, or six blocks long.

Dell may be run­ning neck-to­neck with gi­ants like HP, IBM, and Len­ovo, but at heart, it was al­ways a com­pany driven by in­no­va­tion and en­trepreneur­ship — some­thing it can read­ily get back to, post-pri­va­ti­za­tion. Those track­ing Dell’s ori­gins will re­call how Michael Dell started the com­pany in his dorm room in 1984, with seed cap­i­tal of USD 1,000 at the age of 20. At 18, while study­ing at the Univer­sity of Texas, he took apart IBM PCs, stud­ied them and then built and sold cus­tom­ized PCs with bet­ter per­for­mance specs, yet priced far lower (at that time IBM PCs sold in re­tail stores for USD 3,000).

“I re­al­ized that the com­po­nents in those (IBM) com­put­ers were all made by some­body else, yet they were charg­ing four times the cost of those com­po­nents. It just didn’t seem fair,” said Michael Dell.

CUS­TOMER FO­CUS

Dell as a com­pany is known for iden­ti­fy­ing tech­nolo­gies and prod­ucts that make fat prof­its for its com­peti­tors, and then re- en­gi­neer­ing the same to of­fer bet­ter per­for­mance at lower costs, yet em­brac­ing open in­dus­try stan­dards. And it tops that with fan­tas­tic cus­tomer sup­port, al­though it has re­ceived crit­i­cism for tele­phonic sup­port in re­cent times. In the days of sell­ing PCs, sav­ings for Dell came in by elim­i­nat­ing the mid­dle man (chan­nel and re­tail), by sell­ing di­rectly to cus­tomers through the In­ter­net and phone. Of course, Dell no longer sells di­rect to­day, yet the spirit of in­no­va­tion and ag­gres­sive pric­ing continues within Dell, as it sells en­ter­prise IT so­lu­tions: servers, PCs, tablets, thin clients, stor­age, net­work­ing, soft­ware and ser­vices.

Dell also continues that close en­gage­ment with its cus­tomers and part­ners; Michael Dell spends 40 per­cent of his time with cus­tomers and per­son­ally con­ducts “plat­inum coun­cils” with CIOs around the world. He’s now do­ing the same with other en­ti­ties like uni­ver­si­ties, where a lot of tech talent ex­ists.

With the ex­cep­tion of di­rect sell­ing, noth­ing else changes, in­form Dell ex­ec­u­tives.

While Dell’s suc­cesses came

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.