Diet tips for a happy mon­soon preg­nancy

Mother & Baby - - BUMP TO BIRTH -

AVOID RAW VEG­ETA­BLES

Raw veg­eta­bles con­tain cer­tain en­zymes which can be dif­fi­cult to digest dur­ing preg­nancy. To add to that, raw, chopped veg­eta­bles have a ten­dency to quickly ab­sorb mois­ture, mak­ing them idyl­lic for bac­te­rial growth. So you must to­tally skip eat­ing sal­ads or raw green leafy veg­eta­bles dur­ing the mon­soon. The damp nature of the chopped raw veg­eta­bles gets them quickly con­tam­i­nated, pro­vid­ing a per­fect at­mos­phere for germs to thrive and grow, lead­ing to in­fec­tions.

STAY AWAY FROM RAW CHOPPED FRUIT

You should also avoid fruit high in wa­ter con­tent like water­melon, cu­cum­ber, muskmelon, etc., es­pe­cially if they have been kept in the open for too long. Like the raw veg­gies, these fruit also tend to get con­tam­i­nated due to their damp nature. In case of fruit juices, pre­pare them fresh and con­sume im­me­di­ately. Also, skip eat­ing fruits with a strong smell like jack­fruit and ja­mun. Smelly fruits at­tract flies which carry germs.

UP YOUR WA­TER INTAKE

Keep your­self well-hy­drated to flush out the tox­ins from the body and to cope with the mon­soon hu­mid­ity. If pos­si­ble, drink boiled wa­ter ev­ery time you feel thirsty. When out­doors, opt for juices packed in tetra packs or just sip on co­conut wa­ter. Avoid drink­ing fruit juices from road­side ven­dors.

BE CAU­TIOUS WITH NON-VEGE­TAR­IAN FOODS

Raw eggs and seafood should es­sen­tially be avoided dur­ing mon­soons. Be even more care­ful with prawns as this is the breed­ing sea­son for them. It can also be a good idea to stay away from raw fish and sushi.

DRINK HER­BAL TEA

Her­bal tea can be the best way to bol­ster your im­mune sys­tem and fight in­fec­tions such as cold, flu and headache. In­fuse basil leaves, cin­na­mon, car­damom, fen­nel seeds and gin­ger to your tea. The caf­feine in cof­fee, tea, and so­das can lead to de­hy­dra­tion so try to re­place these caf­feinated bev­er­ages with her­bal tea.

STICK TO HOME-COOKED FOODS

You should be ex­tra care­ful of your diet dur­ing the mon­soon. Street foods can be con­tam­i­nated, and thus, pose an enor­mous threat to you and the health of your baby. Do not give in to your temptations even if you badly crave that pani puri. Re­mem­ber, it is never worth the risk. Stick to home-cooked meals as much as you can!

WASH FRUITS AND VEG­ETA­BLES THOR­OUGHLY

A lot of bac­te­ria gets ac­cu­mu­lated on foods such as cau­li­flower and green leafy veg­eta­bles. It is there­fore im­por­tant to wash them with warm wa­ter or blanch them. Blanch­ing is a cook­ing process in which fruit and veg­eta­bles are first placed in boil­ing wa­ter for 1-2 min­utes and then are placed in iced wa­ter or cold run­ning wa­ter. This helps to get rid of the dirt as well as bac­te­ria, and makes the food safe to con­sume.

RE­FRAIN FROM HIGH-FAT AND SUG­ARY FOODS

Fried foods such as pako­ras and samosas might seem ir­re­sistible dur­ing this sea­son but you must avoid them as the di­ges­tive sys­tem be­comes weak and slug­gish dur­ing the rains. Di­gest­ing foods with high-fat and sugar con­tent be­comes dif­fi­cult. As di­ges­tion be­comes slow, it of­ten leads to in­di­ges­tion and cramps in the stom­ach. Foods which are grilled, steamed or baked are al­ways a bet­ter choice.

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