TIPS AND TRICKS TO SOOTHE A FUSSY BABY

Fussi­ness isn’t lim­ited to nights. Day time too can turn into a bat­tle­field if you are not able to help your baby stay calm. Here are a few prac­ti­cal tips and tricks that will help you soothe your in­fant’s nerves...

Mother & Baby - - BABY & TODDLER -

CALM­ING MO­TION

“Rhyth­mic move­ments of­ten com­fort ba­bies, prob­a­bly be­cause they re­mind them of the mo­tion they ex­pe­ri­enced in the womb,” ex­plains Dr. Saini. Swing­ing smoothly, rock­ing and tak­ing a walk with the baby are some proven fuss-busters.

SOOTH­ING SOUNDS

Just like mo­tion, sounds that re­mind your baby of the warmth of your womb should help ease the ten­sion. A record­ing of the mother’s voice, or sim­ply a white noise will do the trick.

COM­FORT­ING CON­TACT

There’s no other trick more calm­ing that hold­ing the baby in your arms and let­ting the warmth of your skin do what’s needed. The bond be­tween a mother and a child is mag­i­cal, let it work its way through di­rect con­tact!

SWAD­DLING

Wrap­ping your lit­tle one in a soft, thin gar­ment will give him a sense of se­cu­rity and com­fort. How­ever, “over cloth­ing and tight clothes or ties can ir­ri­tate the baby and should be avoided,” warns Dr Saini. Be­sides, make sure you are proac­tive when a change of clothes is called for. Noth­ing an­noys a child like a wet gar­ment.

AD­E­QUATE FEED­ING

While crank­i­ness of­ten im­plies that your baby is hun­gry, feed­ing your baby ev­ery time he cries isn’t the right prac­tice. “Moth­ers usu­ally start feed­ing their baby when they cry. Even when ba­bies are not hun­gry they start to suck on the breast for self­sooth­ing, just like thumb suck­ing and nail-bit­ing in el­ders. This can eas­ily lead to over­feed­ing.” Dr Me­hta ex­plains. He sug­gests, “the gap be­tween the two feeds should be around 2-3 hours.” More­over, you can re­sort to a paci­fier to help your baby re­lax with­out over­feed­ing him.

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