In­ter­na­tional

Point of Purchase - - CONTENTS -

Here’s a look at how shop­per mar­keters could take a closer look at the newer path to pur­chases that in­cludes not just tech en­abled in­for­ma­tion but also a greater over­all brand con­nect .

Cer­tainly

ev­ery shop­per mar­keter is well aware of the path to pur­chase. And there is no ques­tion that it is evolv­ing. The path is be­com­ing more and more com­plex with the ris­ing adoption of the smart­phone and other tech­nolo­gies. And that com­pli­ca­tion will only grow in its in­ten­sity. For ex­am­ple, TV -- which was his­tor­i­cally about build­ing aware­ness through ads and prod­uct place­ment -- is now in­spir­ing shop­ping be­hav­ior. A study con­ducted by Google in 2010 showed that 83 per­cent of TV ad­ver­tis­ing that view­ers watch is done while us­ing com­put­ers and are search­ing a prod­uct af­ter be­ing ex­posed to an ad. What is even more in­ter­est­ing is what they are search­ing… Ac­cord­ing to The Wall Street Jour­nal, 36 per­cent are look­ing up food and bev­er­ages -- items that would nor­mally be con­sid­ered com­mod­ity pur­chases. When we look at the store, sim­i­lar shop­per mul­ti­task­ing is oc­cur­ring. Most shop­pers rely on smart­phones to help make de­ci­sions. Ob­vi­ously, they are check­ing prices and look­ing up prod­uct in­for­ma­tion, and we know this in­for­ma­tion can dra­mat­i­cally change their shop­ping path. But per­haps most in­ter­est­ingly, more than half of these peo­ple pre­fer us­ing their phone rather than ask­ing an as­so­ciate for in­for­ma­tion. This sug­gests that the shop­per trusts the in­for­ma­tion from the broader community ver­sus an as­so­ciate; most of­ten they are look­ing for prod­uct re­views. And nearly all these shop­pers say this in­for­ma­tion has in­flu­enced their pur­chase de­ci­sion. All of these points sug­gest that Shop­per Mar­ket­ing re­lies on de­liv­er­ing an in­te­grated shop­ping ex­pe­ri­ence. But as in­te­gra­tion is quickly be­com­ing the cost of en­try, we be­lieve the true po­ten­tial is some­thing more pow­er­ful than just in­te­gra­tion -- it lies in the power of the con­nec­tion. For ex­am­ple, let’s look at P&G’s first Olympics Cam­paign from 2010. This cam­paign was an early at­tempt at pro­mot­ing P&G, be­yond their in­di­vid­ual brands. It led with a TV ad rooted in con­nec­tion. No per­for­mance claim. No “Rea­son to Be­lieve.” No ef­fi­cacy state­ment. Sim­ply a great spot thank­ing Mom for her work and sac­ri­fice on be­half of our Olympians. And it worked. P&G drove such an emo­tional con­nec­tion with Moms through this cam­paign that they saw a high num­ber of view­ers search­ing for P&G on­line -- purely in or­der to learn how they may sup­port the brand. They also saw a lift in sales as a proof point of this con­nec­tion. It de­liv­ered a strong enough ROI to con­vince them to launch an even big­ger cam­paign for the 2012 Olympics. A bet that is prov­ing very fruit­ful for P&G, and prov­ing the power of mak­ing an emo­tional con­nec­tion with the Shop­per. Based on this per­spec­tive, we have set out to prove the strength of the con­nec­tion. And we are see­ing suc­cess. We helped a fash­ion re­tailer launch an in­te­grated Mother’s Day pro­gram that in­vited fash­ion de­sign­ers, shop­pers, and em­ploy­ees to tell us what they learned from Mom. We fea­tured these heart­felt lessons in the pages of their di­rect mail cat­a­log, in so­cial me­dia, on­line, and in their much-an­tic­i­pated store win­dows. In turn, the shop­pers re­sponded with deeper par­tic­i­pa­tion with the brand. We are also test­ing this phi­los­o­phy in home im­prove­ment -- a more male­dom­i­nated in­dus­try. We cur­rently are launch­ing a re­freshed NY store with win­dow vi­gnettes in­tended to in­spire ur­ban re­dec­o­ra­tion -- the goal be­ing to tell sto­ries through these oc­ca­sions and con­nect with shop­pers be­yond sim­ply mer­chan­dised, prod­uct-fea­tured dis­plays. Through this deeper, richer con­nec­tion we helped shop­pers see the re­tailer as an en­abler to their dreams, and not just a home im­prove­ment ware­house. Ul­ti­mately, we be­lieve the bar has been raised for Shop­per Mar­keters. It is time to let cre­ativ­ity in­spire ac­tion through a rich con­nec­tion that cel­e­brates the shop­per be­yond the per­for­mance of a prod­uct. And we be­lieve the con­nec­tion will be the re­ward — for the shop­per, the brand, and the store

When we look at the store, sim­i­lar shop­per mul­ti­task­ing is oc­cur­ring. Most shop­pers rely on smart­phones to help make de­ci­sions. Ob­vi­ously, they are check­ing prices and look­ing up prod­uct in­for­ma­tion, and we know this in­for­ma­tion can dra­mat­i­cally change their shop­ping path. But per­haps most in­ter­est­ingly, more than

half of these peo­ple pre­fer us­ing their phone

rather than ask­ing an as­so­ciate for in­for­ma­tion.

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