In­dia Re­tail Fo­rum 2017

Progressive Grocer (India) - - Front Page - By Premjit Mo­ha­p­a­tra

Con­fer­ences and takeaways; IM­AGES Re­tail Awards to top re­tail­ers

In­dia’s eco­nomic out­look over the next decade of­fers a promis­ing pe­riod of faster growth, ac­qui­si­tion of new ca­pa­bil­i­ties and the cre­ation of more di­verse and op­ti­mal tools of pro­duc­tion. Bustling with en­ergy and ideas, the coun­try’s young and as­pir­ing pop­u­lace and its grow­ing bulge of dig­i­tally savvy mid­dle class is im­pa­tient for growth and change. In­dia’s re­tail in­dus­try, which is amongst the fastest grow­ing re­tail mar­kets glob­ally, is ac­tively scour­ing for growth po­ten­tial and new op­por­tu­ni­ties. Higher dis­pos­able in­come and an in­crease in con­sumer spend­ing, an ex­pand­ing base of mo­bile users and e-com­merce pen­e­tra­tion, pos­i­tive reg­u­la­tory en­vi­ron­ment and a bur­geon­ing mid­dle class present the re­tail sec­tor in In­dia with tremen­dous po­ten­tial for growth and for tap­ping new op­por­tu­ni­ties.

Even as the fu­ture ap­pears rosy, there are many chal­lenges along the way that could de­rail the sec­tor’s on­ward tra­jec­tory on the path of growth and prof­its. To se­cure its fu­ture and sur­mount the chal­lenges, the in­dus­try needs to fo­cus on build­ing bet­ter ca­pa­bil­i­ties, de­velop ap­pro­pri­ate skills and cul­ti­vate a win­ning mind­set to cre­ate new so­lu­tions that will keep the re­tail sec­tor on the path of sus­tain­able growth.

With this back­drop, the em­i­nent pan­elists at the in­au­gu­ral ses­sion of In­dia Re­tail Fo­rum that con­cluded in Mum­bai re­cently set out to dis­cuss and de­lib­er­ate on the op­por­tu­ni­ties and chal­lenges that await the re­tail sec­tor in In­dia and how the in­dus­try can plan for the fu­ture to achieve the growth tra­jec­tory that its var­i­ous stake­hold­ers so as­pire.

Par­tic­i­pants in the thought-pro­vok­ing and can­did dis­cus­sion were Govind Shrikhande, Chair­man, IRF’17 and CCA and MD, Shop­pers Stop; Kr­ish Iyer, Pres­i­dent & CEO, Wal­mart In­dia, IRF Chair­man 2016; Harriet Green, OBE, IBM Gen­eral Man­ager of Wat­son Cus­tomer En­gage­ment, Wat­son In­ter­net of Things and Ed­u­ca­tion; Arvind Var­chaswi, Man­ag­ing Di­rec­tor, Sriveda Sattva Pri­vate Lim­ited; Philip Auld, MD, Tata Trent; and Shash­wat Goenka, Re­tail Sec­tor head, RP-SG Group. The panel dis­cus­sion was mod­er­ated by B.S. Nagesh, Founder, TRRAIN.

When coun­tries ex­pe­ri­ence growth at 7%8%, changes are in­evitable. All are pro­foundly im­pacted – peo­ple and so­ci­ety at large, econ­omy, cul­ture, con­sumers – by the fast growth and its im­pli­ca­tions, which lead to ma­jor shifts in the wake. There are im­pli­ca­tions for de­vel­op­ment of skills and in­fra­struc­ture, in­no­va­tion in prod­uct and for­mat along with the need for build­ing ad­e­quate and new ca­pa­bil­i­ties. Harriet Green, OBE, IBM Gen­eral Man­ager of Wat­son Cus­tomer En­gage­ment, Wat­son In­ter­net of Things and Ed­u­ca­tion, summed up the sce­nario for In­dia by em­pha­siz­ing the need for a con­certed and co­or­di­nated ef­fort by all ma­jor stake­hold­ers in or­der to cat­alyze an in­no­va­tion cul­ture. Draw­ing from her wide in­ter­na­tional ex­po­sure and busi­ness ex­pe­ri­ence in In­dia, she stressed on the greater need for gov­er­nance, ed­u­ca­tion, pri­vate en­ter­prise, money and cap­i­tal to come to­gether so as to bring about sus­tain­able growth and for achiev­ing the de­sired out­comes. “There are im­pli­ca­tions for de­vel­op­ment of skills, which has al­ways been an In­dia strength; im­pli­ca­tions for in­fra­struc­ture as we look at the in­ter­net of things and how it rolls outs and the im­pli­ca­tions for some of these ground-break­ing tech­nolo­gies, which are all very ex­cit­ing pos­si­bil­i­ties for the mar­ket,” she said.

But while In­dia’s econ­omy is in pole po­si­tion and on the cusp of un­lock­ing new fron­tiers, there is still a long way to go achieve sus­tain­able growth of 7-8%. To main­tain this growth tra­jec­tory, build­ing ca­pa­bil­i­ties is a strate­gic im­per­a­tive. It’s not just about cap­i­tal. A na­tion’s phys­i­cal con­nec­tiv­ity — its net­work of trans­porta­tion and lo­gis­tics in­fra­struc­ture — forms the back­bone of its econ­omy. Ro­bust phys­i­cal con­nec­tiv­ity im­proves pro­duc­tiv­ity, cre­ates em­ploy­ment op­por­tu­ni­ties and low­ers lo­gis­tics costs. Though In­dia has cre­ated new air­ports, metro rail net­works, high­ways, and roads in the past ten years, much work re­mains for the coun­try to im­prove its global com­pet­i­tive­ness in terms of phys­i­cal con­nec­tiv­ity. The cri­sis of ca­pa­bil­ity plagu­ing In­dia was brought to the fore at an event of Ma­ha­rash­tra govern­ment, which fo­cused on in­fra­struc­ture de­vel­op­ment. The state govern­ment can­didly ad­mit­ted to the dearth of qual­ity con­trac­tors for de­vel­op­ing and build­ing roads and ports, rail­ways etc. De­spite the di­lu­tion in stan­dards and spec­i­fi­ca­tions, enough con­trac­tors aren’t still avail­able, lamented the of­fi­cials.

Op­por­tu­ni­ties and chal­lenges

So it is the abil­ity for ca­pa­bil­ity build­ing that is at the core and one that will drive higher lev­els of growth in the coun­try. Kr­ish Iyer, Pres­i­dent & CEO, Wal­mart In­dia and IRF Chair­man 2016, re­count­ing his ex­pe­ri­ence said, “Even if we take Wal­mart as an ex­am­ple and look at the growth num­bers, the ex­tent of ca­pa­bil­ity build­ing that we need to do in terms of tal­ent, dig­i­tal, lo­gis­tics, agri­cul­ture sup­ply chain is quite a task. It re­quires a huge de­gree of fo­cus, ef­fort and cap­i­tal. While cap­i­tal is not a con­straint, the

The key thing is to im­press upon the govern­ment to rec­og­nize re­tail as an in­dus­try. That could be the turn­ing point for the re­tail sec­tor and for which govern­ment sup­port is re­quired. — Govind Shrikhande Chair­man, IRF’17 and CCA and MD, Shop­pers Stop

tal­ent part is cer­tainly a con­straint and one needs to work within that frame­work. Imag­ine, for a coun­try like In­dia, what would be the chal­lenge,” he said, point­ing to the ca­pa­bil­ity crunch con­fronting the re­tail sec­tor. “7-8% growth can be achieved, but it will take a lot in terms of ca­pa­bil­ity build­ing,” he added.

B.S. Nagesh, Founder, TRRAIN, and the mod­er­a­tor for the panel dis­cus­sion, con­curred with the ob­ser­va­tions of Harriet and Iyer. He em­pha­sized the need for skill de­vel­op­ment and ca­pac­ity build­ing and for cre­at­ing tal­ent pools across the or­ga­ni­za­tion. Ob­serv­ing about the role of skill de­vel­op­ment as an im­por­tant driver of fu­ture growth, he said: “We talk about the pop­u­la­tion and the de­mo­graphic div­i­dend and, im­por­tantly, how we em­ploy peo­ple. We need to build the skills and the con­fi­dence of our peo­ple so that they can help drive growth and in­no­va­tion. And if you get the right tech­nol­ogy to go along with it and work to­gether, then we can grow the busi­ness very well.”

While retailing is one of the pil­lars of the econ­omy, short­age of skilled man­power is one of the chal­lenges fac­ing or­ga­nized re­tail­ers in In­dia. Re­tail­ers face great dif­fi­culty in find­ing skilled man­power and for which they have to pay more in or­der to re­tain them. “Build­ing the skills and ca­pa­bil­i­ties is prob­a­bly what we all are miss­ing out on in most of the re­tail busi­ness. In­stead of re­ally build­ing the ca­pa­bil­ity of our peo­ple to grow, we are al­ways look­ing at build­ing ca­pac­ity by adding up stores. So I think there has to be a bal­ance of both,” said Nagesh.

It is im­por­tant to note the crit­i­cal role that the govern­ment has to play in sup­port­ing the growth of re­tail. It can do so by cre­at­ing na­tional plat­forms and fos­ter­ing an en­abling en­vi­ron­ment. The cen­tral govern­ment should adopt a sup­port­ive at­ti­tude in the form of re­lax­ing the sourc­ing re­quire­ments for for­eign com­pa­nies. Sim­i­larly, state gov­ern­ments can help to at­tract in­vest­ment cap­i­tal through the poli­cies they im­ple­ment. “The key thing for the in­dus­try is to im­press upon the govern­ment to rec­og­nize re­tail as an in­dus­try. That could be the turn­ing point for the re­tail sec­tor in In­dia and for which govern­ment sup­port is re­quired,” ob­served Govind Shrikhande, Chair­man, IRF’17 and CCA and MD, Shop­pers Stop.

The im­pact of govern­men­tal sup­port has been most felt in the Eastern re­gion of the coun­try, which un­til re­cently was con­sid­ered lack­ing in ini­tia­tive. Shash­wat Goenka, Re­tail Sec­tor Head, RP-SG Group, which has pres­ence in the North­east and south of the coun­try besides the East, said: “We are see­ing high­est growth in the East and the high­est co­op­er­a­tion from gov­ern­ments in those re­gions. There is a lot that is hap­pen­ing, not just in the ma­jor ci­ties of the East but also in the ru­ral areas as well and that is what is lead­ing to higher growth in the East.”

In­dia, with all its chal­lenges, com­plex­i­ties and prob­lems, con­tin­ues to re­main an at­trac­tive in­vest­ment des­ti­na­tion and is gain­ing trac­tion with global brands. It is a hugely con­trast­ing coun­try – while be­ing one of the big­gest out­sourc­ing coun­tries in the world re­spon­si­ble for run­ning big plants, the back-end sys­tems of big cor­po­rate still strug­gle to man­age the roads dur­ing flood­ing or even to de­clare re­sults in time for our premier uni­ver­si­ties. But de­spite the myr­iad prob­lems, In­dia has demon­strated the abil­ity to reg­is­ter higher growth.

“If you are pas­sion­ate about the re­tail the­atre, mar­ket­ing and mak­ing of brands, or are an as­pir­ing de­signer, or an­a­lyst or a sup­ply chain spe­cial­ist, then there is no bet­ter place to be in to­day than In­dia. The op­por­tu­ni­ties here are huge. If we look at parts of Europe, then coun­tries there would die for hav­ing the kind of growth there is in In­dia. Many of these coun­tries have an ex­cep­tional tal­ent pool and they do ex­cel­lent work but find it elu­sive to achieve high growth. But here, when the team gets it right, then the up­side is ab­so­lutely huge. Also, not to for­get that the con­sumer is just as crit­i­cal. I think his/ her ex­pec­ta­tion that you de­liver the au­then­tic prod­uct is just as acute as any­where else in the de­vel­oped mar­kets. But if you can do it, then the op­por­tu­nity is huge,” said Philip Auld, MD, Tata Trent, elab­o­rat­ing on his ex­pe­ri­ence of do­ing busi­ness in In­dia and the growth of the econ­omy. “For any­body who is con­sid­er­ing this dy­namic mar­ket, it’s all about the prod­uct. If you have a prod­uct and if you can de­liver it ef­fec­tively to the con­sumer, then there is no bet­ter mar­ket than the one we are in,” added Auld.

Chang­ing pro­file of con­sumers in re­tail

Con­sumers to­day have high as­pi­ra­tions and are in­creas­ingly savvy in the choices they make. The value con­scious and dig­i­tally con­nected con­sumer is em­pow­ered to de­mand change. This pro­file of an in­creas­ingly aware, savvy and am­bi­tious con­sumer has cre­ated a strong need to ad­dress the cause. And a key im­pli­ca­tion of this rapid con­sumer evo­lu­tion is that In­dian re­tail­ers should sharply iden­tify the emerg­ing op­por­tu­ni­ties and cus­tomer seg­ments.

To con­sider, the re­tail scene in the East has changed dras­ti­cally in the past 10-15 years. A lot of youth who ear­lier used to mi­grate to other parts of the coun­try for job op­por­tu­ni­ties, ed­u­ca­tion and growth are now com­ing back. Brain drain has given way to brain gain and there is a lot more ac­tion, ground en­ergy and buzz in the East. “Con­sumers, par­tic­u­larly in South­east Asia, are much ex­posed to the West­ern world. Besides be­ing as­pi­ra­tional, they are in­creas­ingly de­mand­ing. This as­pi­ra­tional need to con­sume brands that rep­re­sent higher value and class or even con­sume more than what they can af­ford has re­sulted in a shift to­wards pre­mi­u­miza­tion in the last six years. As a re­tailer, there is a big pull fac­tor as op­posed to push fac­tor,” said Shash­wat Goenka, sum­ming up the sit­u­a­tion in the East.

The In­dian re­tail mar­ket is very het­ero­ge­neous in na­ture. The dy­nam­ics of var­i­ous seg­ments change with the ge­og­ra­phy and other cul­tural fac­tors. The chal­lenge for the re­tailer is to keep this het­ero­ge­neous na­ture of the tar­get mar­ket in mind

There are im­pli­ca­tions for de­vel­op­ment of skills, in­fra­struc­ture, in­ter­net of things and im­pli­ca­tions for some of these ground-break­ing tech­nolo­gies... — Harriet Green OBE, IBM Gen­eral Man­ager of Wat­son Cus­tomer En­gage­ment, Wat­son In­ter­net of Things and Ed­u­ca­tion

Build­ing the skills and ca­pa­bil­i­ties is what we all are miss­ing out on in most of the re­tail busi­ness. In­stead of re­ally build­ing the ca­pa­bil­ity of our peo­ple, we are look­ing at build­ing ca­pac­ity by adding up stores. — B.S. Nagesh Founder, TRRAIN

and iden­tify the op­por­tu­ni­ties in dif­fer­ent seg­ments. Nagesh said: “We of­ten look at In­dia as one ho­moge­nous en­tity. But many a times there are huge op­por­tu­ni­ties that are ac­tu­ally emerg­ing in dif­fer­ent seg­ments of In­dia. Where there is a top end seg­ment, there is also a con­ser­va­tive In­dia com­pris­ing a very rich seg­ment and will­ing to spend on very ex­pen­sive gourmet food, high-end prod­ucts and ab­so­lutely top end of­fer­ings and ser­vices. You have to iden­tify your op­por­tu­ni­ties and po­si­tion your prod­uct.”

Thanks to ever-greater ac­cess to the in­ter­net and mo­bile con­nec­tiv­ity, In­dia has en­tered the dawn of mo­bile in­flu­ence. Im­proved avail­abil­ity cou­pled with easy fi­nanc­ing schemes has ac­cel­er­ated the smart­phone adop­tion rate in the coun­try. Two decades ago, own­ing a mo­bile was a huge talk­ing point, an ex­cep­tion. To­day, mo­bile phones are ubiq­ui­tous so much so that re­tail­ers use it as a lever to in­flu­ence, to sug­gest, to tempt the huge mass of po­ten­tial con­sumers with their of­fer­ings. Smart­phones have made it eas­ier for con­sumers to com­pare prices and de­cide where to shop; they are ev­ery re­tailer’s shop win­dow be­cause they are avail­able in ev­ery hand, can be ac­cessed any­time and any­where and can serve dif­fer­ent needs of the con­sumer through­out the day. It has not just en­abled on­line shop­ping but in­creased the ex­pe­ri­en­tial value of the same. On the other hand, it has helped re­tail­ers to ex­pand their con­sumer catch­ment and grow faster, some­thing that the brick-and-mor­tar store alone could not have been able to achieve. On­line re­tail­ers have been able to grow by re­tain­ing con­trol of the cus­tomer ex­pe­ri­ence and proac­tively sup­port­ing what in­for­ma­tion con­sumers need at each stage of the shop­ping process.

The fast ris­ing smart­phone pen­e­tra­tion, in­creased adop­tion by shop­pers and im­proved mo­bile func­tion­al­ity for re­tail ap­pli­ca­tions present a huge op­por­tu­nity to value re­tail­ers for speak­ing di­rectly to the cus­tomers. “Mo­bile phones have de­moc­ra­tized ac­cess to the very lat­est trends. Peo­ple have worked very hard for what they have got and they are very savvy. Peo­ple are look­ing for only the au­then­tic prod­ucts at dif­fer­ent price points; the value part is so breath­tak­ing that it is an op­por­tu­nity. It will be only very few ex­clu­sive ones who will be able to com­mand that dif­fer­en­tial,” said Philip Auld.

From a tech­nol­ogy per­spec­tive, a need is be­ing felt to think about the el­e­ments of data and its se­cu­rity as well as how it can be done. There is a gen­eral agree­ment that In­dia has a very spe­cial set of chal­lenges around is­sues such as build­ing a huge scale, price points, and on data in­for­ma­tion se­cu­rity not­with­stand­ing the size of the en­ter­prise. Harriet Green had an in­ter­est­ing take about the no­tion that the fu­ture of data, in­for­ma­tion se­cu­rity, con­sumers, and re­tail was driven by the mo­bile phone or that en­ter­prises sim­ply are re­luc­tant of and don’t wish to share their valu­able data with other providers. “As an en­ter­prise, you need to en­sure that at the core of your busi­ness is the se­cu­rity of the data or the in­for­ma­tion of your providers be­cause that data is the DNA of your en­ter­prise and it is some­thing not to be sac­ri­ficed for any price point,” said Harriet.

Safe han­dling of con­sumer in­for­ma­tion has be­come all the more im­por­tant con­sid­er­ing that post de­mon­e­ti­za­tion, there has been a spike in the num­ber of cus­tomers who pre­fer pay­ing by card. “Be­fore de­mon­e­ti­za­tion, credit card busi­ness for us was about 55 per cent and 45 per cent was in cash. Post de­mon­e­ti­za­tion, when you look at the De­cem­ber-jan­uary pe­riod, credit card went as high as 90 per cent and as 92 per cent in Jan­uary. Then it fell down and cur­rently it is back to the 50- 55 per cent in cards. Which means that card pay­ment has come back as strong or even stronger than it ear­lier was,” noted Govind Shrikhande. Con­cur­ring with Shrikhande, Shaswat Goenka said: “I com­pletely agree. We were 50-55 per cent in cards pay­ment be­fore de­mon­e­ti­za­tion, which went up to 90-98 per in the De­cem­ber-jan­uary pe­riod. To­day, we are back to 50-55 per cent for pay­ment through cards.”

Even if we take Wal­mart and look at the growth num­bers, the ex­tent of ca­pa­bil­ity build­ing that we need to do in terms of tal­ent, dig­i­tal, lo­gis­tics, sup­ply chain, is quite a task. — Kr­ish Iyer Pres­i­dent & CEO, Wal­mart In­dia, and IRF Chair­man 2016

In In­dia, we have the ad­van­tage of a young pop­u­la­tion. So the fu­ture should be about cre­at­ing many small en­trepreneurs and en­sur­ing how they can be­come feed­ing sys­tems for big­ger en­ter­prises. — Arvind Var­chaswi MD Sriveda Sattva Pri­vate Lim­ited

An eco­nomic boom over a sus­tained pe­riod of time has sev­eral pos­i­tives: it has the im­pact of lift­ing a whole mass of peo­ple lan­guish­ing at the bot­tom of the pyra­mid and im­prov­ing lives by rais­ing their per capita in­come. But the grim re­al­ity is that In­dia as coun­try is so un­der­in­vested in health, ed­u­ca­tion and in­fra­struc­ture that the ba­sic needs of the ru­ral poor are un­met. So when growth comes to the bot­tom of the pyra­mid, not only is there a rise in the per capita in­come but also on other fronts such as ac­cess to bet­ter health fa­cil­i­ties, higher sav­ings for rainy days and small in­vest­ments in prop­erty. Also, all this talk of mo­bile tech­nol­ogy and in­ter­net of things are largely ir­rel­e­vant for the ru­ral poor as what they have is a ba­sic in­stru­ment used pri­mar­ily as a means of ver­bal com­mu­ni­ca­tion. So up­grad­ing to a smart­phone when the ben­e­fits of growth per­co­late to the bot­tom isn’t a pri­or­ity for the poor. “The op­por­tu­ni­ties at the bot­tom of the pyra­mid are se­verely lim­ited but if we talk of the mid­dle there is a big op­por­tu­nity, which is 300-400 mil­lion and may grow up to 600 mil­lion. And that op­por­tu­nity needs to be tapped,” said Kr­ish Iyer, speak­ing from his ex­pe­ri­ence of ex­ten­sive trav­el­ling in ru­ral and semi-ru­ral areas and meet­ing a lot of cus­tomers and end con­sumers.

But with the kind of mo­bile pen­e­tra­tion and cov­er­age now preva­lent in In­dia, there are al­ways op­por­tu­ni­ties if you have a prob­lem solv­ing and in­no­va­tive mind­set. Wal­mart is mak­ing the most of this mo­bile pen­e­tra­tion op­por­tu­nity by help­ing small re­tail­ers go tech savvy, so that con­nec­tiv­ity with sup­pli­ers or whole­salers is es­tab­lished and auto re­plen­ish­ment is en­sured for the re­tail­ers, i.e., what­ever gets sold can au­to­mat­i­cally get re­plen­ished from the whole­sale chan­nel. “I be­lieve the fun­da­men­tals in terms of tech­nol­ogy adop­tion need to be put in place. Sim­ple things are what they are look­ing for at this point in time and big­ger things will come in the next ten years or so as far as the ma­jor­ity of pop­u­la­tion is con­cerned,” opined Iyer about re­tail op­por­tu­ni­ties ex­pand­ing to in­clude the pop­u­la­tion at the bot­tom of the pyra­mid.

To make the most of this kind of growth, In­dia needs to cul­ti­vate en­trepreneurs. And it needs to be

If we look at parts of Europe, then coun­tries there would die for hav­ing the kind of growth there is in In­dia. But here, when the team gets it right, then the up­side is ab­so­lutely huge. — Philip Auld MD, Tata Trent

car­ried out on a scale un­prece­dented so as to also per­co­late into smaller towns and districts through­out the coun­try. The ap­proach will help tap into a larger pool of tal­ent avail­able to feed the growth ecosys­tem and to keep the coun­try on the path of growth. It will also help build new ca­pa­bil­i­ties es­sen­tial for on­go­ing in­no­va­tion of new prod­ucts, ser­vices, and busi­ness mod­els that are in­te­gral to the mak­ing of a vi­brant fu­ture econ­omy. “In In­dia, we have the ad­van­tage of a young pop­u­la­tion. So the fu­ture should be about cre­at­ing many small en­trepreneurs and en­sur­ing how they can be­come feed­ing sys­tems for big­ger en­ter­prises. I think that’s where even mo­bile tech­nol­ogy could play a huge role. Rather than there be­ing growth only in spurts in cer­tain seg­ments or en­ter­prises, the en­tire coun­try as a whole can grow to­gether,” said Arvind Var­chaswi, Man­ag­ing Di­rec­tor, Sriveda Sattva Pri­vate Lim­ited, em­pha­siz­ing on the need for in­clu­sive growth and de­velop so­lu­tions to meet In­dia’s chal­lenges. “I think there is a need for a shift in the minds of our ru­ral youth – from a job seek­ing mind­set to an en­tre­pre­neur­ial mind­set. There is a need for a lot of en­cour­age­ment for en­trepreneur­ship. It is some­thing that all of us as re­tail­ers should take upon our­selves; that we cre­ate growth but not job­less growth but in­clu­sive in na­ture,” said Shash­wat Goenka.

We are see­ing high­est growth in the East and the high­est co­op­er­a­tion from gov­ern­ments in those re­gions. There is a lot that is hap­pen­ing, not just in the ma­jor ci­ties of the East but in the ru­ral areas as well. — Shash­wat Goenka Re­tail Sec­tor Head, RP-SG Group

L to R: Harriet Green OBE, IBM GM, Wat­son Cus­tomer En­gage­ment, Wat­son In­ter­net of Things and Ed­u­ca­tion

Govind Shrikhande Chair­man, IRF’17 and CCA and MD, Shop­pers Stop

Kr­ish Iyer Pres­i­dent & CEO, Wal­mart In­dia, and IRF Chair­man 2016

Arvind Var­chaswi MD, Sriveda Sattva Pri­vate Lim­ited

Philip Auld MD, Tata Trent

Shash­wat Goenka Re­tail Sec­tor Head, RP-SG Group

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