I Be­lieve

Savvy - - Contents -

Ac­tress Juhi Chawla opens up about love, life, her pageant days and find­ing her place in the glitzy world of Bol­ly­wood.

I was a qui­etly am­bi­tious kid. I wanted to do well, and worked hard for what I wanted but didn’t feel the need to tell peo­ple I was do­ing it.

PUNJABI KUDI FROM CUFFE PA­RADE

I come from a Punjabi fam­ily and grew up in Cuffe Pa­rade, Mum­bai. My child­hood was very nor­mal and I grew up in a home where we were well pro­vided for, but within rea­son. My par­ents were the hard­work­ing sort, my mother was an ex­ec­u­tive in the house­keep­ing depart­ment at the Taj while my fa­ther worked with the In­come Tax depart­ment.

Our lit­tle fam­ily also in­cluded my el­der brother. He was tall, hand­some and had all the girls chas­ing him. While I, on the other hand, was a lal­loo. My brother was bright but didn’t like work­ing hard, and as a re­sult my mother would of­ten scold him. This had a di­rect im­pact on me, and I de­cided to do bet­ter so that my par­ents would be proud of me and not worry about me. But on the whole, as a fam­ily, we grew - from one strength to another - to­gether.

QUIET & AM­BI­TIOUS

I stud­ied at the CJM Fort School in Mum­bai, and was a con­sci­en­tious lit­tle kid. How­ever, till the 7th stan­dard, I had no clue what was go­ing on in school, and sim­ply could not grasp my stud­ies. But I got bet­ter af­ter that and by the time I com­pleted school, I was one of the top­pers. I even be­came the head girl in my fi­nal year.

My dad wanted me to be­come ei­ther an IAS Of­fi­cer or a Char­tered Ac­coun­tant, while my mother wanted me to take up sales and mar­ket­ing. But I was a qui­etly am­bi­tious kid. I wanted to do well and worked hard for what I wanted, but didn’t feel the need to tell peo­ple I was do­ing it.

WIN­NING THE MISS IN­DIA TI­TLE

I was only 17 or 18 when I was crowned Miss In­dia. When you’re young, you’re more likely to think less and just plunge into things. I was in col­lege at that time and there were th­ese forms float­ing around. My friends de­cided to

I was only 17 or 18 when I was crowned Miss In­dia. When you’re young, you’re more likely to think less and just plunge into things.

par­tic­i­pate in the con­test and I de­cided that if they could take part, then so could I.

Luck was on my side and I got through the first round of the com­pe­ti­tion. The next round in­volved an in­ter­view at the of­fice of the mag­a­zine or­ga­niz­ing the com­pe­ti­tion. There were about 200 ap­pli­cants and we all went through sev­eral rounds till the fi­nal event, where I was crowned Miss In­dia 1984!

I couldn’t be­lieve it, as I was still that gawky kid who was no­body, and then sud­denly I be­came Miss In­dia. But it was also very ex­cit­ing.

RUB­BING SHOUL­DERS WITH THE QUEENS

But the real shock came a month later when I re­alised I had to rep­re­sent In­dia in the Miss Uni­verse pageant. I had never stepped out of In­dia and sud­denly they were send­ing a lit­tle girl to Amer­ica for the Miss Uni­verse pageant. I was like, ‘Oh my God! What am I go­ing to do there?’ I en­tered Miss In­dia for a laugh but this was a big shock!

The pageant was be­ing held in Mi­ami, Florida, USA. It was my first trip abroad but what an ex­pe­ri­ence it was! There were girls from around the world and sud­denly I was thrown into a sit­u­a­tion where on the one hand you wanted to be friends with oth­ers as you were far away from home, but on the other hand, it was also a com­pe­ti­tion. How­ever, I did make some friends and had a lot of fun hang­ing out with some of the girls there.

On the last day, my mum flew down to sur­prise me. I was thrilled but the mo­ment I saw her, I started cry­ing - I didn’t re­alise I had be­come home­sick. In the end, I didn’t win the crown but I did get the award for the best na­tional cos­tume and I was happy with that.

MY PAR­ENTS’ RE­AC­TION

My par­ents were open-minded and would have sup­ported me in what­ever I chose to do. They were sur­prised when I par­tic­i­pated in the pageant as they didn’t know that I was think­ing about some­thing like be­com­ing Miss In­dia.

Re­cently, I found a video clip of an in­ter­view they did for She­ma­roo. When the in­ter­viewer asked them, ‘What was your re­ac­tion when she took part in Miss In­dia or when Juhi got into films?’, my mum said, ‘She did it like any other job which has its ad­van­tages and dis­ad­van­tages’. And my fa­ther said, ‘I think what­ever my Juhi will take on, she’ll do it well’. That’s when I re­alised what my par­ents thought of me when I was young.

FORAY INTO FILMS

A few months af­ter I re­turned from the Miss Uni­verse pageant, I re­ceived calls from Ajani Mu­rani’s of­fice say­ing that they were mak­ing a film and re­quest­ing if I was in­ter­ested. At that time, I had a thirst for ad­ven­ture and said, ‘Why not?’ My mum and dad were a lit­tle ap­pre­hen­sive and so my mum came along with me for the au­di­tion.

A few months later, I got a call say­ing that I had been se­lected for the film ‘Sul­tanat’. This was my first film and a new ex­pe­ri­ence for me. There were so many stars like Sridevi and Sunny Deol, who un­til then I had only seen on screen. Ev­ery­body was larger than life. It was a bilin­gual film and I had been cast op­po­site Karan Kapoor, Shashiji’s (Shashi Kapoor) son. But it turned out to be a very tiny role in the end be­cause I wasn’t well-known. Nev­er­the­less, it was un­nerv­ing for me to be on the sets. I felt like no­body there, my teeth would chat­ter and knees knock. There were times I would pray my shot didn’t come to­day or it would be done with re­ally quickly.

I had done some plays in school but be­ing in front of the cam­era with big stars was dif­fer­ent. You feel so tiny. I re­mem­ber when we were shoot­ing the first song in Kash­mir - it was a duet be­tween Karan and me - I was so scared. I was tongue-tied. There was Karan Kapoor in front of me, who was so good look­ing and hand­some, and I didn’t know what to say.

I was still study­ing then, so when I went to col­lege, ev­ery­one asked me, ‘You are work­ing with Karan Kapoor? How is he? What is he like? What did you say?’ And I was like, ‘Ac­tu­ally, I didn’t say any­thing’.

It was un­nerv­ing for me to be on the sets. I felt like no­body there, my teeth would chat­ter and knees knock. There were times I would pray my shot didn’t come to­day or it would be done with re­ally quickly.

BE­COM­ING A STAR WITH ‘QSQT’

Af­ter ‘Sul­tanat’ came ‘Qaya­mat Se Qaya­mat Tak’. By that time, I started mod­el­ling and do­ing ad shoots. I think Nasir Hus­sain sa­hab had seen some of my ads or maybe he saw me in ‘Sul­tanat’; ei­ther way, his of­fice con­tacted me, ask­ing me to meet with him re­gard­ing a film. I met them at their of­fice for a screen test and was in­tro­duced to Aamir (Khan). We were both no­bod­ies then. Nasir

sa­hab told Aamir to teach me the lines and I did some re­hearsals with Aamir tu­tor­ing me. A few days later, I got a call say­ing I had been se­lected for the role.

Around the same time, I was se­lected for a film in the South In­dian film in­dus­try. The film was in Tamil and Kan­nada. I was not fa­mil­iar with the lan­guage but I de­cided to go for it. It was not easy and I re­ally slogged over there. Day and night, I would sit and study my lines and would learn how to dance on the set. Then I would re­turn to Mum­bai to shoot for ‘QSQT’ which was a cake walk be­cause it was in Hindi, the lan­guage I un­der­stood. It was com­par­a­tively easy and the peo­ple I was work­ing with were new as well, so there was no­body to be scared of.

My South film re­leased a few months be­fore ‘QSQT’ and it was a su­per hit. ‘QSQT’ also did well, but not from day one. By the third week, it

‘Qaya­mat Se Qaya­mat Tak’ is what an­chored me in the in­dus­try. Had it not been for that film, I would have been do­ing some small roles some­where.

started pick­ing up and af­ter six weeks, it was do­ing very well. To­day, the me­dia will tell you whether a film is a hit or flop within a day, but back then we had to wait for the fig­ures and if you weren’t from the film in­dus­try, you didn’t know what was go­ing on. But ‘QSQT’ made me fa­mous and my ca­reer took off af­ter that.

AAMIR KHAN – MY GOOD BUDDY

My ca­reer be­gan along­side Aamir and we had a great time to­gether - he was like a buddy to me. We were around the same age and he had no airs about him and no at­ti­tude. We have helped each other along the way and if there’s one per­son who I felt at ease with or I had to call when in trou­ble, it was Aamir. It was won­der­ful work­ing with him. I was not from the in­dus­try so if some­thing hap­pened, then I would call up Aamir and ask him. And if he was in a film and I was ap­proached for the same, I would say yes im­me­di­ately. I felt very safe and com­fort­able when he was around but there were no link-ups.

TIFF WITH AAMIR

Aamir was some­body I liked as a friend. We used to fight about tiny things. Once we fought over some­thing stupid and didn’t speak to each other for some time. We were shoot­ing for ‘Ishq’ and Aamir and Ajay (Devgn) would pull pranks on me on the set. They went on till a point where I al­most cried. I was up­set and in an ego­tis­ti­cal mo­ment, de­clared that I would not shoot the next day.

And to my word, I didn’t go to the set the next day. The fol­low­ing day, Aamir, Ajay and In­duji came to my house and Aamir apol­o­gized. But once that was re­solved, Aamir got very up­set with me. He said, ‘You can say any­thing to me or fight with me, but you can­not not come to the set. The whole day of shoot­ing got stalled be­cause of you. And that’s a big loss to the pro­ducer be­cause the whole unit turned up’. I didn’t know about th­ese things be­cause I didn’t be­long to a pro­duc­tion back­ground. He didn’t talk to me and be­cause of that I was a lit­tle afraid and didn’t know whether I was sup­posed to go and talk to him or not.

But years later, some­thing hap­pened and I went to meet him and said, ‘Aamir, it was very stupid’, and he said, ‘Why didn’t you just come and say some­thing to me be­fore?’ He thought I was an­gry with him and I thought he was an­gry with me. That’s why it is so im­por­tant to clear things be­cause some­times it’s just a mis­com­mu­ni­ca­tion. We end up cre­at­ing a rift by not say­ing and leav­ing things un­said, and peo­ple end up be­liev­ing what they think is true.

CRE­AT­ING MAGIC WITH SHAH RUKH

A year or two into my ca­reer, Vivek Vaswani ap­proached me

Aamir thought I was an­gry with him and I thought he was an­gry with me. That’s why it is so im­por­tant to clear things.

with a film he was mak­ing with Sippy Pro­duc­tions. They were cast­ing a new boy - Shah Rukh Khan - and Vivek told me that he’s just like Aamir. I was like, ‘ Achaa, very good’, be­cause Aamir to me was very good look­ing; in fact, much bet­ter look­ing than I was. So I said fine.

I didn’t watch a lot of TV but they told me Shah Rukh is very big and well-known for his se­rial ‘Fauji’. Then Az­izji came to me and told me the story of the film ‘Raju Ban­gaya Gen­tle­man’. Az­izji is the nicest, most pleas­ant look­ing gen­tle­man you can work with. I can’t re­mem­ber what story he told me but I said, ‘Yes, I am do­ing this film’. When I went to the set, I saw Shah Rukh Khan - who turned out to be thin, not very tall, very brown with hair up to his eye­brows. I thought to my­self, ‘This is the hero?’ But as I started work­ing with him, I re­alised he was very good at what he did. He was not at all like a new­comer. He re­hearsed, added to the scene and helped the di­rec­tor. He made us laugh but he was also very in­tel­li­gent and bright.

But I re­mem­ber this one scene we were shoot­ing at Mukesh Mills which was just five min­utes away from my home. I was thrilled, my aun­ties had come from Delhi to visit us, so they came to meet me at the set and said, ‘ Arey, this is the hero! But look at the di­rec­tor’. So they would come es­pe­cially to see the di­rec­tor. It was great fun work­ing on the film and Shah Rukh and I be­came good friends and de­vel­oped a good rap­port.

Com­par­isons in the film in­dus­try are in­evitable. It wasn’t just out­siders, my own fam­ily would see Mad­huri and say, ‘See how well she’s dancing, see how good she’s look­ing. What are you do­ing?’

BE­ING COM­PARED TO MAD­HURI DIXIT & SRIDEVI

Com­par­isons in the film in­dus­try are in­evitable. It wasn’t just out­siders, my own fam­ily would see Mad­huri and say, ‘See how well she’s dancing, see how good she’s look­ing. What are you do­ing?’ I would say, ‘Please don’t com­pare me. I am me and I can’t be like her’. I knew that Mad­huri was an ex­cel­lent dancer and I couldn’t do what she did. But, luck­ily, I found my strength in com­edy and rom­com films, which I ex­celled in. Mad­huri and I only met so­cially, we never did a film ear­lier.

Sride­viji, I don’t think I was ever com­pet­ing with. In fact, I was in­spired by her. She was al­ready a huge star and I was a big fan and still am. She is ex­cel­lent. I have tried to learn from her films or scenes. But Mad­huri was a con­tem­po­rary ac­tress and if you ask, ‘Were you com­pet­ing with her?’ I would say, ‘Yes, at that phase of my ca­reer, I was com­pet­ing with her’. A year or two later, Karisma Kapoor, Raveena Tan­don, Man­isha Koirala, Ur­mila Ma­tond­kar etc came in. We were all hero­ines at the same time and in the same decade.

FI­NALLY WORK­ING WITH MAD­HURI

Much later, Mad­huri and I worked to­gether for a film called ‘Gu­lab Gang’. It was an amaz­ing and won­der­ful ex­pe­ri­ence. Since I had not done any­thing like this be­fore, I hes­i­tated in the be­gin­ning. But then I re­alised it was an ex­cit­ing

Mad­huri and I worked to­gether for a film called ‘Gu­lab Gang’. It was an amaz­ing and won­der­ful ex­pe­ri­ence. Since I had not done any­thing like this be­fore, I hes­i­tated in the be­gin­ning. But then I re­alised it was an ex­cit­ing role.

role. Ob­vi­ously, I could not imag­ine Mad­huri and I be­ing to­gether in a film and do­ing sim­i­lar things - like both of us dancing - be­cause peo­ple would com­pare us. But here was a film where I was poles apart from her in char­ac­ter­i­sa­tion. She was play­ing the hero­ine and I was the vil­lain. There was no one scene where you can say she did it bet­ter than me. I had my own role and I had a blast shoot­ing for it.

But since we hadn’t met or chat­ted be­fore, they called us to the of­fice be­fore we started shoot­ing. They just kind of let us be and that’s where we got to know each other a lit­tle bit. We broke the ice and then we started shoot­ing.

MAK­ING IT WITH­OUT A GOD­FA­THER

I didn’t re­ally have a God­fa­ther but there were peo­ple who helped me. Nasir Hus­sain sa­hab gave me a film, and for­tu­nately, for all of us, it did well. ‘QSQT’ is what an­chored me in the in­dus­try. Had it not been for that film, I would have been do­ing some small roles some­where. So I am al­ways grate­ful to him.

B R Cho­pra was go­ing to give me the role of Drau­padi for his ‘Ma­hab­harata’ se­rial but by then I had got ‘QSQT’, so he said, ‘Don’t do tele­vi­sion, go and do films’. Like­wise, I met some good peo­ple and some not so nice peo­ple too.

I think des­tiny, God and my own will­ing­ness to work kept me go­ing. I am al­ways grate­ful to God and my fam­ily for hav­ing been there for me al­ways. I feel when you come from a se­cure home, then it au­to­mat­i­cally makes you feel stronger.

But be­yond that, I am amazed at the au­di­ence who ac­cepted me for who I was. Be­cause now when­ever I see ‘QSQT’, I say to my­self, ‘Look at my makeup, oh my God, how bad I was look­ing! What did peo­ple like about me?’

MEET­ING JAI & MAR­RY­ING HIM

Com­ing to my love life and mar­riage, it all started when the Hindu-Mus­lim ri­ots took place in Mum­bai. The in­dus­try had shut down. No work was hap­pen­ing. I went to din­ner with my friends in town and that’s where I met Jai. It wasn’t the first time we met, but I hadn’t seen him in six to eight years. The last time was back when I was in col­lege. We re­con­nected at that din­ner, and few months later, he came for my birth­day party. Af­ter that, we started keep­ing in touch. A year later, we got en­gaged and soon af­ter that we got mar­ried. As a hus­band, Jai is very good. He is very nice and has been very sup­port­ive. Ac­tu­ally more than him, I got re­ally lucky with my mother-in-law. She, from the be­gin­ning, told me, ‘You are like another daugh­ter to me. You are like my Radha’, my sis­ter-in-law.

CON­TIN­U­ING WORK POST MAR­RIAGE

When I lost my mother, I was dev­as­tated. I couldn’t be­lieve that the per­son I loved the most on earth was snatched away. It was earth-shat­ter­ing for me. And soon af­ter that, I was get­ting mar­ried. Also, you know when you’re get­ting mar­ried, your ca­reer is sup­posed to be over. So I was feel­ing very low. I felt like every­thing that I lived for was be­ing taken away from me. My mother-in-law came to my res­cue and said, ‘If it doesn’t make you happy to stay at home, then do what makes you happy’. Jai be­longed to an in­dus­tri­al­ist fam­ily. Ide­ally, I would’ve given up my ca­reer and just been his other half. But my mother-in-law let me con­tinue my work and that’s why my ca­reer has gone long, I owe a lot to her.

But Jai has been with me through thick and thin. We are dif­fer­ent in many ways but I know I can lean on him. He lets me be and gives me space. Oth­er­wise, we are like a reg­u­lar cou­ple, fight­ing over silly things but he’s still my best friend. He will al­ways want the best for me. Now, I am part of his com­pany, on the board of di­rec­tors and have been at­tend­ing his board meet­ings.

MY KIDS, MY WORLD

I don’t know if mar­riage changed me or not, but moth­er­hood cer­tainly did. I am learn­ing ev­ery day about par­ent­ing and I still can’t say that I know how to be a mother. And what I have learnt, and I keep re­mind­ing my­self, is to not push my dreams and as­pi­ra­tions onto them. They have to be who they want to be. I try and help them find them­selves.

As a hus­band, Jai is very good. He is very nice and has been very sup­port­ive. Ac­tu­ally more than him, I got re­ally lucky with my mother-in-law.

I think the IPL de­ci­sion was more be­tween Shah Rukh and Jai. I had just in­vested. Also, at that point, they wanted glam­orous names to cre­ate that stir.

So when­ever they say I want to be this or that, I say, ‘Okay, if you re­ally want to do it, then en­joy it’.

The mo­ment I had my kids, my life changed. The mo­ment my kids are cough­ing, I run them to the doc­tor or spend sleep­less nights. My outlook to­wards chil­dren and the en­vi­ron­ment changed af­ter hav­ing them. So what­ever they want to do, I will en­cour­age them.

START­ING OUR PRO­DUC­TION HOUSE

The idea to start our pro­duc­tion house ‘Dreamz Un­lim­ited’ was Az­izji’s ini­tia­tive in 2000. Shah Rukh and I had done ‘Raju Ban Gaya Gen­tle­man’ and ‘ Yes Boss’ with him. And we were go­ing to do ‘Phir Bhi Dil Hai Hin­dus­tani’. So Az­izji said, ‘Why don’t we only pro­duce the film?’ It was his idea and I knew noth­ing about it. I just joined in with Shah Rukh and Az­izji. That’s how we started our pro­duc­tion house, and we did not stop at any­thing to make it the best film of the year. So we over­spent on every­thing but the film didn’t do well. Ob­vi­ously, it was dis­heart­en­ing.

A year later, we put up a lit­tle com­pany and said let’s do some­thing smaller. So we started work on ‘Ashoka’. Then we made another film, ‘Chalte Chalte’. I was hav­ing my sec­ond baby then, and Az­izji’s wife passed

away, so things changed af­ter that. Though ‘Chalte Chalte’ did well, some­how af­ter that we couldn’t get back to­gether for a film.

GET­TING INTO IPL

When the IPL was be­ing set up, no­body imag­ined that it would be­come such a big suc­cess. This was when Lalit Modi in­vited us to own a team and my hus­band thought it was a good idea, and told Shah Rukh about it. Shah Rukh said: Let’s do it. We just thought that we would own a cricket team, we didn’t think it would be­come so big. We were lucky to get into it in the be­gin­ning, now you can’t even think of get­ting into it.

But I think the IPL de­ci­sion was more be­tween Shah Rukh and Jai. I had just in­vested. Also, at that point, they wanted glam­orous names to cre­ate that stir. So Pri­ety Zinta and other big in­dus­trial houses also got into it. Ini­tially, we were in­volved in all the meet­ings and I would just be there. I then dropped out as there was too much to han­dle. It was very ex­cit­ing but there was work to be done and de­ci­sions to be made. Luck­ily, Jai and Shah Rukh knew more about this field than me.

The ini­tial years, how­ever, were very rough for the KKR team (Kolkata Knight Rid­ers). Our team just col­lapsed ev­ery year. And my kids used to scream and cry and say, ‘Why is your team like this? Why did you buy that team?’ We would get so stressed out dur­ing the matches. But things started to get bet­ter in 2012 when we got a new CEO in place and Gau­tam Gamb­hir as the cap­tain. The team started to shine and then we won the tro­phy twice.

PAS­SION FOR MU­SIC

While all this was hap­pen­ing, I de­cided to reignite a pas­sion I left be­hind as a kid. Grow­ing up, I would lis­ten to songs on the ra­dio. I don’t know where this thought came from, but I wanted to be a singer and so en­rolled my­self in Hin­dus­tani Clas­si­cal mu­sic, and the classes were at a school near our house. I used to go with my book and write all my sargams very nicely and prac­tise them on the way home and to class. Six-seven months later, our teacher left. Then about 10 years ago, I re­alised that I had time and could re­learn singing. So I am pur­su­ing it slowly now.

I would be happy to work with Sal­man, with whom I’ve never worked ex­cept for a small scene in ‘Salaam-e-Ishq’ and ‘Dee­wana Mas­tana’.

FU­TURE PLANS

I would be very happy to work with Shah Rukh and Aamir once again. In fact, I would be happy to work with Sal­man, with whom I’ve never worked ex­cept for a small scene in ‘Salaame-Ishq’ and ‘Dee­wana Mas­tana’.

But now I wouldn’t want to do the kind of films I did ear­lier. There was a time for that. Now I do films which in­ter­est me. How­ever, they are still do­ing the ro­man­tic movies with young ac­tresses which is fine. But I am on to dif­fer­ent things - what I love to do is work with good di­rec­tors and ex­cit­ing scripts… Af­ter ‘Chalk N Duster’, I will play a teacher again; this time a mu­sic teacher in a Kan­nada film ti­tled ‘Very Good’. I have shot for the role, and the film is yet to re­lease.

I have re­cently launched a project close to my heart, ‘Cit­i­zens for To­mor­row’, to cre­ate aware­ness for the well-be­ing of the en­vi­ron­ment and look at cre­at­ing an im­pact with grad­ual steps for the bet­ter­ment of our planet at large. ‘Cit­i­zens for To­mor­row’ pri­mar­ily works on cre­at­ing noise against the harm­ful ef­fects of plas­tic on our en­vi­ron­ment.

I am also work­ing on spread­ing aware­ness about the harm­ful ef­fects of plas­tic through var­i­ous so­cial me­dia plat­forms, talk shows and pre­sen­ta­tions around the city. Plus, I’m back­ing Sadhguru’s (Jaggi Va­sudev) cur­rent ini­tia­tive ‘Rally for Rivers’.

Though films will al­ways be a big part of my life, I am pas­sion­ate about do­ing my part to help the enivorn­ment, spend­ing time with my fam­ily, tak­ing on new en­deav­ours and liv­ing my life to the fullest.

I am also work­ing on spread­ing aware­ness about the harm­ful ef­fects of plas­tic through var­i­ous so­cial me­dia plat­forms, talk shows and pre­sen­ta­tions around the city.

With kids and hus­band

Pho­to­graph: Ram Bher­wani Hair & Makeup: Natasha Britto & Naima Rahim­tulla Out­fit: Re­becca De­wan Styling: Kar­ishma Gu­lati

Stills from the film ‘Ishq’

With Aamir Khan

With Shah Rukh Khan

With Mad­huri Dixit Nene and Saroj Khan

Stills from my films

With Mad­huri Dixit Nene

With hus­band Jai Me­hta

Pho­to­graph: Ram Bher­wani Hair & Makeup: Natasha Britto & Naima Rahim­tulla Jacket: Cu­rio Cot­tage Styling: Kar­ishma Gu­lati

With Karan Jo­har and Mad­huri Dixit Nene on ‘Kof­fee With Karan’

With Sal­man Khan on ‘Bigg Boss’

For more jaw-drop­ping and in­spir­ing cover sto­ries (I Be­lieve), log on to savvy. co.in

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