IIJS Proves Its Might

Gen­er­ates I8,000 crore or­der book

Solitaire - - CONTENTS - Shanoo Bi­jlani and Re­gan Luis re­port.

The 35th edi­tion of the In­dia in­ter­na­tional Jew­ellery Show ( IIJS), or­gan­ised by the Gem & Jew­ellery Ex­port Pro­mo­tion Coun­cil (GJEPC), con­cluded with a note of pos­i­tiv­ity and cheer for the en­tire trade. The fair saw many firsts – a spe­cial pre­view day was added to the reg­u­lar five- day show, a new 10,500 sq m Hall 7A was in­tro­duced, and a record 35,000 vis­i­tors pre- reg­is­tered for the event.

The show floor was buzzing with ac­tiv­ity across all sec­tions on all six days of IIJS Pre­miere, in­di­cat­ing that the buy­ing season has started in earnest for the year. The 1,300 ex­hibitors at the Bom­bay Ex­hi­bi­tion Cen­tre, The Lalit and The Leela were happy to en­ter­tain a to­tal of over 49,000 unique vis­i­tors, of which more than 1,000 were from over­seas.

The 35th edi­tion of IIJS was in­au­gu­rated by guest of hon­our Gae­tano Cava­lieri, pres­i­dent of CIBJO, the World Jew­ellery Con­fed­er­a­tion, along with GJEPC chair­man Pramod Agrawal, GJEPC vice chair­man Colin Shah, and GJEPC con­vener of na­tional ex­hi­bi­tions, Shailesh San­gani.

Ex­pec­ta­tions were low be­fore the show started, but the buy­ing spree has boosted trade sen­ti­ments tremen­dously. Colin Shah said, “This year, the to­tal vol­ume of busi­ness gen­er­ated in this event has grown by 20% with an or­der book of R8,000 crore. This has come at a time when the in­dus­try needed it the most due to pre­vail­ing head­winds that the trade has seen over the past 12 months.”

Union min­is­ter of com­merce & in­dus­try and civil avi­a­tion, Suresh Prabhu, who couldn’t at­tend the in­au­gu­ra­tion as he had to ful­fil a par­lia­men­tary obli­ga­tion, told the gath­er­ing in a taped video ad­dress that the com­merce min­istry has formed an ad hoc com­mit­tee of 12 mem­bers from the gem and jew­ellery in­dus­try who will form the struc­ture for the Gold Coun­cil in In­dia. Prabhu said, “In In­dia, one finds a jew­eller in ev­ery vil­lage who

hand­crafts cus­tomised jew­ellery for his clients. This com­bi­na­tion of cus­tomi­sa­tion and hand­made jew­ellery has a huge po­ten­tial in the global mar­ket. And we are pro­mot­ing these var­i­ous skills by set­ting up train­ing in­sti­tutes and Com­mon Fa­cil­ity Cen­tres (CFCs).”

In his key­note ad­dress, Agrawal noted that In­dia was aim­ing to achieve an ex­port tar­get of $70 bil­lion in a few years’ time and the in­dus­try is gear­ing up to get to that num­ber. Agrawal added, “We wel­come the an­nounce­ment and ex­press our thanks to the hon­ourable min­is­ter for tak­ing the great ini­tia­tive of re­form­ing this in­dus­try to take it for­ward. We will con­tinue such ef­forts and cre­ate in­fra­struc­ture to train peo­ple in jew­ellery man­u­fac­tur­ing. With IIJS this year we have yet again been able to show­case to the world our abil­ity and pre­pared­ness for con­tin­u­ing to be the num­ber one gem and jew­ellery sourc­ing des­ti­na­tion in the world.”

Gae­tano Cava­lieri pledged CIBJO’s sup­port for In­dia’s gem and jew­ellery in­dus­try in his speech at the open­ing cer­e­mony. Ad­dress­ing the as­sem­bled gath­er­ing, Cava­lieri con­grat­u­lated the GJEPC for its ongoing work in the de­vel­op­ment and pro­mo­tion of the In­dian gem and jew­ellery sec­tors. Cava­lieri said, “In­dia has been a crit­i­cally im­por­tant player in our in­dus­try for decades al­ready, but ini­tially was re­garded pre­dom­i­nantly as a pro­duc­tion cen­tre. To­day, it is one of a hand­ful of coun­tries, to­gether with the US and China, whose pres­ence is felt in all stages of the chain of dis­tri­bu­tion, both driv­ing and sat­is­fy­ing de­mand.”

In­dia has been a crit­i­cally im­por­tant player in our in­dus­try for decades al­ready, but ini­tially was re­garded pre­dom­i­nantly as a pro­duc­tion cen­tre. To­day, it is one of a hand­ful of coun­tries, to­gether with the US and China, whose pres­ence is felt in all stages of the chain of dis­tri­bu­tion.

Cava­lieri added, “But not only is In­dia im­por­tant to our in­dus­try, our in­dus­try is crit­i­cal to In­dia, con­tribut­ing about 7% of its GDP, about 16% of its to­tal mer­chan­dise ex­ports, and em­ploy­ing more than 4.64 mil­lion work­ers. With al­most 18% of the world’s pop­u­la­tion, In­dia is a coun­try that con­clu­sively demon­strates that, while pre­cious gem­stones and jew­ellery may be non-es­sen­tial lux­ury items, the jew­ellery and gem­stone in­dus­try is an in­dis­pens­able part of the global econ­omy.”

Shailesh San­gani rounded off the in­au­gu­ra­tion cer­e­mony with a vote of thanks, and noted that the IIJS has be­come one of the busiest shows in the world and one of the largest gem and jew­ellery trade fairs in Asia. “We will con­tinue to in­vest in tech­nol­ogy, staff and or­gan­i­sa­tion of the event. With the ex­pan­sion of the show by 10,500 sq m, the long wait­ing list has come down to 100 com­pa­nies,” he said.

New Ideas, New Edge

The

IIJS flaunted the coun­try’s de­sign strengths and catered to var­ied tastes across the do­mes­tic and global mar­kets. The ever ob­ser­vant man­u­fac­tur­ers ac­knowl­edged the chang­ing eco­nomic sce­nario and cul­tural trends, and pre­sented col­lec­tions that matched the aes­thet­ics of the mod­ern woman.

Walk­ing across the spa­cious aisles and brows­ing through the decked up booths, one got a

quick overview of what’s new at the show. In gen­eral, ex­hibitors show­cased an in­ter­est­ing in­ter­play of tex­tures in nearly all di­a­mond­set gold jew­ellery. Pink or rose gold jew­ellery were trend­ing heav­ily, with a smat­ter­ing of di­a­monds and tex­tu­ral play. Su­rat-based Sphere, a debu­tant at IIJS, dis­played some dainty and youth­ful rose gold trin­kets with a silken satin fin­ish and a gar­nish­ing of VVS, FG colour di­a­monds.

Di­a­mond jew­ellery in prêt wear saw a sweep of flo­ral and geo­met­ric mo­tifs in a mul­ti­tude of rings, ear­rings and slim bracelets. Light­weight jew­ellery un­der R2 lakh was highly pop­u­lar, so was jew­ellery set with fancy-cut di­a­monds com­ple­mented with coloured gem­stones.

Kun­dan-meena bridal jew­ellery is go­ing through a re­nais­sance mo­ment. Pas­tel shades

Di­a­mond jew­ellery in prêt wear saw a sweep of flo­ral and geo­met­ric mo­tifs in a mul­ti­tude of rings, ear­rings and slim bracelets. Light­weight jew­ellery un­der K2 lakh was highly pop­u­lar, so was jew­ellery set with fancy-cut di­a­monds com­ple­mented with coloured gem­stones.

in­clud­ing sea green, aqua­ma­rine, powdery blue and pink, cobalt, and oth­ers are dom­i­nat­ing mo­tifs in this seg­ment. Large, state­ment ear studs – em­bel­lished with pearls and gem­stones, matha pat­tis (head or­na­ments) in heavy and light for­mats are in. Lay­ered neck­laces are trend­ing, too.

San­skriti Jew­els, Mum­bai had a huge col­lec­tion of pink coloured jew­els, in­clud­ing pink pearls, pink co­ral, tour­ma­lines, pink opal and more. “Pas­tel shades are a hit with cus­tomers to­day,” said co-owner Karan Gar­o­dia.

Jaipur Jew­els, Jaipur pre­sented a range of art deco ear­rings and brooch-cum-pen­dants called Gra­di­ent that fea­tured om­bré baguette-cut emer­alds, amethysts, ru­bies, green and pink tour­ma­lines, peri­dots and cit­rine set in gold. “It took us six years to get the per­fect gra­di­ent shades of each gem­stone and then cal­i­bre cut them to get the de­sired ta­pered baguette shape,” in­formed Vaib­hav Dhadda, cre­ative head and co-owner of the com­pany.

In gold, fu­sion for­mats in a mix of old and new mo­tifs were back. Mum­bai-based ace de­signer Anand Shah pre­sented chan­de­lier ear­rings weigh­ing from 22g to 50g pep­pered with emer­ald and tour­ma­line brio­lettes. His bridal col­lec­tion with long neck­laces fea­tured pearl rows, un­cut di­a­monds, and Rus­sian emer­alds.

Va­su­pati Jewellers, Mum­bai dis­played a range of bridal sets from kun­dan-meenakari work to grand neck­laces that fea­tured gem­stones en­cased with fil­i­greed trim­mings.

Ab­dul Rehman Shaikh of Gold Ar­tism, a Mum­bai-based gold jew­ellery brand, un­veiled a light­weight col­lec­tion be­low

R2 lakh, the high­light be­ing kun­dan-set polkis, di­a­monds pat­terned with pres­sure and in­vis­i­ble set­tings.

Buy­ers Vote For Gold

Gold

jew­ellery, helped in part by lower do­mes­tic prices, saw a resur­gence in de­mand at IIJS. Deepak Choksi, owner of CVM Ex­ports, Ju­na­gadh, re­marked that the mood had re­vived. “We have seen great de­mand from across In­dia for our hand­crafted jew­ellery set with polkis, from rings re­tail­ing up­wards of R8,000 to large fes­tooned neck­laces and bibs that are ar­ranged with grad­u­ated polkis.”

Vi­jay Jain of VK Jew­els, Mum­bai was de­lighted at be­ing al­lot­ted a booth at IIJS for the first time. His wide range of jew­ellery from kun­dan-meena to hand­made di­a­mond jew­ellery was ap­pre­ci­ated by tier 2 and tier 3 city re­tail­ers from south­ern In­dia. Naresh Par­mar of M.R. Gold Pvt. Ltd., Mum­bai stated that light­weight man­gal­su­tras weigh­ing be­tween 7g and 12g were favoured by most buy­ers.

Ash­win Shah, di­rec­tor, An­saa, Mum­bai said that vis­i­tors had be­gun buy­ing for the up­com­ing fes­tive and wed­ding sea­sons. Al­though his acrylic and gold di­a­mond neck­laces were ap­pre­ci­ated by many, he con­fessed that buy­ers set­tled for light­weight, hand­made jew­ellery sets weigh­ing be­tween 80g and 200g.

Rakesh Sanghvi, di­rec­tor, Union Chains, Mum­bai show­cased in­no­va­tive (patent pend­ing) gold fab­ric wo­ven with pearls and Swarovski crys­tals. “Due to the hike in im­port du­ties, the lo­cal man­u­fac­tur­ing in­dus­try has got a tremen­dous push. Our indige­nous man­u­fac­tur­ing of world-class jew­ellery is a shin­ing ex­am­ple of ‘Make in In­dia’,” Sanghvi added. He noted that fol­low­ing GST, de­mon­eti­sa­tion, and dig­i­tal­i­sa­tion, con­duct­ing busi­ness has be­come eas­ier and more trans­par­ent.

Te­jas Shah of RR Jewellers, Ra­jkot, said this IIJS has re­ceived a bet­ter re­sponse than last year and his light­weight jew­ellery made with Ital­ian tech­ni­cal know-how was be­ing sup­plied to mar­kets across In­dia. Even his typ­i­cally tra­di­tional Ra­jkot jew­ellery that was im­pacted by the three-month slump, was now do­ing well.

Me­hul Solanki of Solanki Jewellers, Mum­bai, noted that com­ing to IIJS felt as if busi­ness was nor­mal­is­ing. His an­tique jew­ellery weigh­ing be­tween 50g and 350g was pick­ing up. Pramod Me­hta, part­ner, Shilpi Jewellers, Mum­bai, was happy with the new lo­ca­tion in Hall 7A and was all praise for the pre­view day as it gave him a chance to in­ter­act with clients at a leisurely pace. He said, “IIJS 2018 is a hit! Ev­ery sin­gle 22-karat prod­uct as well as our plat­inum jew­ellery has re­ceived a su­perb re­sponse.” K. Srini­vasan, man­ag­ing di­rec­tor, Emer­ald Jewel In­dus­try In­dia Ltd., who had a range of light­weight col­lec­tions, said they sold es­pe­cially well in Mum­bai, Delhi and the south­ern re­gion.

Jain­ish Zaveri, part­ner of brand Ab­hishek Zaveri, Ahmed­abad, noted that right from the pre­view day, they saw a good num­ber of queries. “Buy­ers across the na­tion are plac­ing or­ders for an­tique bridal jew­ellery, which is our spe­cial­ity.”

Anand Kulthia, owner of Kulth­iaa Jewel Pvt. Ltd., Kolkata, who has been spe­cial­is­ing in di­a­mond jew­ellery, un­veiled a bridal gold col­lec­tion at the

show. Kulthia noted that their hand­made gold col­lec­tion re­ceived a tremen­dous re­sponse from buy­ers. “We have been par­tic­i­pat­ing in IIJS for seven years and we have grown ex­po­nen­tially over this pe­riod.” Vi­jay Chor­dia, part­ner, Valen­tine Jew­ellery, Jaipur, ex­claimed, “It’s a pos­i­tive show and re­tail­ers have come with a pos­i­tive mind­set. The show will make the mar­ket up­beat across the coun­try.” Valen­tine Jew­ellery’s new kun­dan-meena line and the di­a­mond jew­ellery col­lec­tion un­der R3 lakh re­ceived a lot of buyer in­ter­est.

For Kama Schachter, while the first quar­ter was slow, re­tail has picked up in the last 20 days and the ap­petite to stock up is pal­pa­ble, in­formed Ami Gokani, vice pres­i­dent-sales. “Plat­inum is a grow­ing cat­e­gory and our plat­inum col­lec­tion bear­ing ac­cents of gold are do­ing well, es­pe­cially in the South.”

Krown Jew­els, Mum­bai, in­tro­duced 22-karat elec­tro-formed hol­low ban­gles, neck­laces, and rings in var­i­ous shades of gold in­clud­ing bronze, yel­low, rose, and more. Owner Pankaj Kod­nani sees a big fu­ture in jew­ellery with an Ital­ian fin­ish as it sat­is­fies In­dian sen­si­bil­i­ties of wear­ing chunky pieces while keep­ing the gold weight down. “The buy­ing quan­tum has come down be­cause the youth no longer seem interested in in­vest­ing in jew­ellery. How­ever, the show has been ex­cep­tion­ally good for us,” he said.

Broth­ers Jay­deep and Yash Vad­her of R.K. Sil­ver & Gold, Ra­jkot, in­formed that they were left with less than 5kg of stock by day four. Their light­weight jew­ellery col­lec­tions were a great draw at the show. Made with Ital­ian tech­nol­ogy, the com­pany of­fered col­lec­tions in 22-karat gold with In­dian con­cepts.

Nina Gana­tra, part­ner of Hem­raj Jew­ellery Craft, Cut­tack, in­formed that buy­ers from Ahmed­abad, Jaipur and Ban­ga­lore and two large cor­po­rate houses of In­dia booked or­ders for their hand­made sil­ver com­po­nents such as pen­dants, bell mo­tifs, etc. in tarakashi work.

The im­proved am­bi­ence, brisk sales, un­prece­dented foot­falls at IIJS has yet again re­vived the mar­ket sen­ti­ment in In­dia. Let the good times roll!

Due to the hike in im­port du­ties, the lo­cal man­u­fac­tur­ing in­dus­try has got a tremen­dous push. Our indige­nous man­u­fac­tur­ing of world-class jew­ellery is a shin­ing ex­am­ple of ‘Make in In­dia’.

(Fac­ing page) Gae­tano Cava­lieri at the rib­bon­cut­ting cer­e­mony, joined by San­jay Kala, Ashok Ga­jera, Colin Shah, Pramod Agrawal, Shailesh San­gani and Ashok Seth. (Be­low) A view of the new hall 7A.

Gold: The long and the short of it!

You flaw­less beauty!

Va­su­pati Jewellers

Har­it­sons De­signs Pvt. Ltd.

An­saa Jewellers

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