Engines

Revving up the Engines

SP's Aviation - - TABLE OF CONTENTS - BY R. CHAN­DRAKANTH

AT THE 2017 PARIS In­ter­na­tional Air­show, the two big giants of the com­mer­cial air­craft in­dus­try Boe­ing and Air­bus, had new air­craft or­ders and com­mit­ments worth $120 bil­lion, cer­tainly mu­sic to the ears of en­gine man­u­fac­tur­ers. With global air traffic pro­jected to dou­ble by 2030, led by the Asia-Pa­cific re­gion, the com­mer­cial air­craft in­dus­try is on a song. The global air­craft mar­ket is pro­jected to reg­is­ter ad­di­tion of over 32,600 new com­mer­cial air­craft through 2034, worth $4.9 tril­lion. Like the two giants Boe­ing and Air­bus, there are ma­jor play­ers in the aero en­gine seg­ment as well and they in­clude Rolls-Royce, GE Avi­a­tion, Pratt & Whitney and CFM In­ter­na­tional which is a joint ven­ture of GE and Safran. Rolls-Royce is a pre-em­i­nent engi­neer­ing com­pany fo­cused on world-class power and propul­sion sys­tems. It is one of the world’s lead­ing pro­duc­ers of aero engines for large civil air- craft and cor­po­rate jets. It is the second largest provider in the world of aero engines for mil­i­tary air­craft. Rolls-Royce’s Trent XWB is the world’s most ef­fi­cient large aero en­gine and the Trent 1000 is the most re­li­able and durable en­gine for the air­craft it pow­ers. From these foun­da­tions, its fu­ture prod­uct strat­egy aims to meet chal­leng­ing en­vi­ron­men­tal tar­gets with the launch of two new en­gine con­cepts, Ad­vance and Ul­traFan, fea­tur­ing both new ar­chi­tec­tures and in­no­va­tive tech­no­log­i­cal im­prove­ments.

20 PER CENT MORE EF­FI­CIENT FROM 2020

Rolls-Royce states that Ad­vance will have higher ef­fi­ciency, fewer parts and lower weight, en­abled by a new core ar­chi­tec­ture. A new light­weight low-pres­sure sys­tem also brings im­prove­ments, thanks to a host of in­no­va­tive sys­tem tech­nolo-

WITH A LONG HIS­TORY OF IN­NO­VA­TION AND GROUND­BREAK­ING TECH­NOL­OGY, GE CON­TIN­UES TO SPEND $1BIL­LION EVERY YEAR ON COM­MER­CIAL JET EN­GINE RE­SEARCH AND DE­VEL­OP­MENT

gies in­clud­ing ad­vanced light­weight al­loys and a new car­bon ti­ta­nium fan sys­tem, com­pris­ing the fan blades and fan cas­ing.

UL­TRAFAN: THE UL­TI­MATE TUR­BO­FAN

Ul­traFan fea­tures a new geared ar­chi­tec­ture, en­sur­ing the fan runs at op­ti­mum speed, as does the en­gine com­pres­sor and tur­bine, thanks to the core ar­chi­tec­ture. The Ul­traFan is ex­pected to be 25 per cent more ef­fi­cient from 2025.

Rolls-Royce de­liv­ered en­cour­ag­ing year-on-year op­er­a­tional progress in the first six months of 2017; large en­gine vol­umes in­creased 27 per cent. With fur­ther growth in the over­all value of its or­der book which in­cludes or­ders for over 2,700 large engines in civil aerospace which re­flects an av­er­age five years of pro­duc­tion in­clud­ing six years of cover for the Trent XWB fam­ily that power the Air­bus A-350.

Rolls-Royce has cus­tomers in over 150 coun­tries com­pris­ing over 400 air­lines and leas­ing cus­tomers. It has three com­mon themes across all its busi­nesses – in­vest­ing in and de­vel­op­ing engi­neer­ing ex­cel­lence; driv­ing a man­u­fac­tur­ing and sup­ply chain trans­for­ma­tion which will em­bed op­er­a­tional ex­cel­lence in lean, lower-cost fa­cil­i­ties and lev­er­ag­ing its in­stalled base, prod­uct knowl­edge and engi­neer­ing ca­pa­bil­i­ties to pro­vide cus­tomers with out­stand­ing ser­vice through which it can cap­ture af­ter­mar­ket value.

CFM IN­TER­NA­TIONAL LEAP-FROGGING

CFM In­ter­na­tional is a 50:50 joint ven­ture be­tween Snecma (Safran) and GE Avi­a­tion. It de­vel­ops, pro­duces and sells the world’s best sell­ing en­gine CFM56 en­gine and the new ad­vanced tech­nol­ogy LEAP (lead­ing edge avi­a­tion propul­sion). The new­est LEAP en­gine meets to­day’s en­vi­ron­men­tal ex­pec­ta­tions, de­liv­er­ing a 15 per cent fuel im­prove­ment, 50 per cent lower NOx emis­sions and a 75 per cent re­duc­tion in noise ver­sus to­day’s air­craft. It is a mod­ernised re­place­ment for the suc­cess­ful CFM56 and is in­tended to com­pete with the Pratt & Whitney PW1000G in the sin­gle-aisle jet­liner mar­ket.

CFM In­ter­na­tional’s ad­vanced LEAP en­gine is set­ting new in­dus­try stan­dards for fuel ef­fi­ciency and as­set util­i­sa­tion as the com­pany cel­e­brates the first an­niver­sary of its en­try into com­mer­cial ser­vice. The first LEAP-pow­ered com­mer­cial flight hap­pened on Au­gust 2, 2016 on a Pe­ga­sus Air­lines flight from Is­tan­bul to An­talya. Since then, more than 75 LEAP-pow­ered air­craft have en­tered ser­vice with a to­tal of 15 op­er­a­tors in four con­ti­nents. In ad­di­tion to Pe­ga­sus, AirAsia, Air In­dia, Avianca Brazil, Azul, Ci­tilink, easyJet, Fron­tier, In­ter­jet, Nova Air­lines, SAS, SriLankan, Virgin Amer­ica, Vistara and WOW air have all taken de­liv­ery of at least one LEAP-pow­ered air­plane. Over­all, this fleet has logged over 200,000 flight hours and 1,00,000 flight cy­cles.

“The LEAP en­gine en­try into ser­vice is the most suc­cess­ful in our his­tory and has been ex­cep­tional by any mea­sure,” said Gaël Méheust, Pres­i­dent and CEO of CFM In­ter­na­tional. “Our cus­tomers are thrilled with the fuel ef­fi­ciency the en­gine is pro­vid­ing, as well as the world-class util­i­sa­tion level they are achiev­ing with this very im­por­tant as­set. Air­craft pow­ered by the LEAP en­gine are fly­ing more than 95 per­cent of avail­able days. This is sim­ply un­prece­dented for a new en­gine.”

CFM In­ter­na­tional has de­liv­ered over 29,000 com­mer­cial engines to date. It has re­ceived or­ders for over 10,000 LEAP engines at a value of $140 bil­lion ac­cord­ing to list prices.

Com­ment­ing on its achieve­ment to date, CFM In­ter­na­tional Pres­i­dent and CEO Jean-Paul Ebanga said: “We are hon­oured that air­line cus­tomers around

WITH OVER 33,000 ENGINES IN SER­VICE, GE IS A WORLD LEADER IN JET EN­GINE MAN­U­FAC­TUR­ING, OF­FER­ING PROD­UCTS FOR MANY OF THE BEST-SELL­ING COM­MER­CIAL JETS

the world con­tinue to show pref­er­ence for CFM engines. The CFM56 fam­ily is still go­ing strong and we be­lieve LEAP or­ders will raise de­mand lev­els even higher as our tech­nol­ogy choices prove them­selves in the flight test pro­grammes at Air­bus and Boe­ing.” This year makes the start of the tran­si­tion to LEAP en­gine pro­duc­tion, with more than 140 units in the plan. The com­pany ex­pects to com­plete the tran­si­tion by 2020 with an an­nual pro­duc­tion rate of more than 2,000 engines. CFM will con­tinue to build CFM56 spare engines for many years to sup­port the in-ser­vice fleet and plans to pro­duce spare parts for the pro­gramme un­til around the year 2045.

GE US­ING NEW TECH­NOLO­GIES FOR EN­GINE DE­VEL­OP­MENT

Fair­field, Connecticut-based Gen­eral Elec­tric Com­pany whose jet en­gine busi­ness, its most prof­itable op­er­a­tion, is worth about $18 bil­lion. GE is work­ing to de­velop a com­mer­cially vi­able tech­nique for mass pro­duc­ing engines of car­bon fiber and ceram­ics, ma­te­ri­als that are two-thirds lighter than nickel and ti­ta­nium al­loys cur­rently used to make engines.

With over 33,000 engines in ser­vice, GE is a world leader in jet en­gine man­u­fac­tur­ing, of­fer­ing prod­ucts for many of the best-sell­ing com­mer­cial jets. Each one of GE’s com­mer­cial engines is a leader in its class for per­for­mance, re­li­a­bil­ity and cost of own­er­ship.

With a long his­tory of in­no­va­tion and ground-break­ing tech­nol­ogy, GE con­tin­ues to spend $1bil­lion every year on com­mer­cial jet en­gine re­search and de­vel­op­ment. Avi­a­tion is a most prof­itable busi­ness at GE, next only to its boom­ing en­ergy unit. The com­pany’s op­er­at­ing profits jumped six per cent last year to $3.5 bil­lion while rev­enues climbed seven per cent to touch $18.6 bil­lion.

For the twin-aisle air­craft, GE has the GE90, GE9X, GEnx, GP7200 and CF6 while for the sin­gle-aisle air­lin­ers, the engines are CFM56 and LEAP. For re­gional air­craft, it has the CF34 en­gine which helped launch the era of re­gional jets. More than 135 mil­lion flight hours and 110 mil­lion flight cy­cles later, it con­tin­ues to set the stan­dard for per­for­mance, dura­bil­ity and de­pend­abil­ity.

PRATT & WHITNEY, FROM THE WASP TO PUREPOWER 1000G

Fred­er­ick Rentschler founded Pratt & Whitney in Hart­ford, Connecticut, in 1925. Its first air­craft en­gine trans­formed the avi­a­tion in­dus­try. It was the 410-horse­power, air-cooled Wasp, which de­liv­ered un­prece­dented per­for­mance and re­li­a­bil­ity for the time. Pratt & Whitney hase been lead­ing change ever since.

To­day, Pratt & Whitney de­vel­ops game-chang­ing tech­nolo­gies for the fu­ture, such as the PurePower PW1000G en­gine, with patented Geared Tur­bo­fan en­gine tech­nol­ogy. The com­pany’s world­wide large com­mer­cial en­gine main­te­nance, re­pair and over­haul network pro­vides in­no­va­tive ser­vices that add value and de­light cus­tomers around the globe.

Pratt & Whitney’s large com­mer­cial engines power more than 25 per cent of the world’s main­line pas­sen­ger fleet. The com­pany con­tin­ues to de­velop new engines and work with its part­ners in In­ter­na­tional Aero Engines and the En­gine Al­liance to meet air­line cus­tomers’ fu­ture needs.

Pratt & Whitney, Canada, has pro­duced more than 80,000 engines, of which there are cur­rently more than 50,000 engines in ser­vice by more than 10,000 op­er­a­tors in 200 coun­tries.

The world’s top jet en­gine mak­ers are ramp­ing up re­search and de­vel­op­ment ef­forts to cash in on a boom­ing global mar­ket for com­mer­cial air­lin­ers that has pro­duced a huge num­ber of or­ders. They are all in­deed revving up their engines.

ROLLS-ROYCE AD­VANCE AND UL­TRAFAN CTI FAN BLADE FLIES FOR THE FIRST TIME

THE 737 MAX JET USES A PAIR OF LEAP ENGINES THAT IN­CLUDE 3D-PRINTED COMPOSITES AS WELL AS SPACE-AGE CERAM­ICS

PRATT & WHITNEY’S LARGE COM­MER­CIAL ENGINES POWER MORE THAN 25 PER CENT OF THE WORLD’S MAIN­LINE PAS­SEN­GER FLEET

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